Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brian Wakamo notes that Kirsten Gillibrand is pushing for postal banking in the U.S. as an alternative to predatory lenders in underserved communities. – Glen Hodgson discusses the rising fiscal costs of climate change – even as the Trudeau Libs plan to put public money into exacerbating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The CCPA offers some questions and answers on the problems with “social impact bonds” designed to turn the delivery of needed programming into a source of corporate profits. And Andy Blatchford reports on the Trudeau Libs’ secretive attempt to undermine any prospect of prosecutions for corporate crimes. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – The Equality Trust highlights the perpetual concentration of wealth among an extremely privileged few in the UK. LOLGOP points out how U.S. Republicans would rather let people die than see them adequately sustained by a fair minimum wage and secure social supports. And Paul Solman writes about the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Alan Freeman discusses the U.S.’ decline based on anti-tax dogma – and warns of the same result in Canada if we don’t stand up for our collective interests: The U.S. has always been a capitalist society but it always believed in meritocratic principles, allowing smart, hard-working individuals to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Quirks & Quarks examines the potentially devastating effects of a dilbit spill on British Columbia’s coast. And David Climenhaga warns that Kinder Morgan is looking at NAFTA to provide it an alternate source of risk-free profits at public expense. – Mia Rabson reports on Canada’s continued failure to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Matthew Yglesias examines the direct effects of social programs, and finds there’s every reason to invest more in them: Mercury emissions (mostly from coal plants) end up in the water, where they end up in fish, from whence they end up in the bloodstreams of children and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Stanford discusses what can be done to make international terms of trade serve the public, rather than merely offering multinational corporations control over all participants:  Acknowledging that globalisation produces losers as well as winners, allows us to imagine policies to moderate the downsides of trade – and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Noortje Uphoff writes about the long-term effects of growing up in poverty and the resulting stress on a child: Our childhood affects our health across the course of our lives. Stress, it seems, is a major contributor. While a life lived with financial, educational and social security ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2018 Links

The latest from the Saskatchewan NDP’s leadership campaign as the voting window closes and the results are about to be unveiled. (Note that members voting online are able to cast a ballot until 3:00 PM.) – Not surprisingly, the impending vote has led to plenty more media coverage, including a lengthy list of candidate profiles. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2018 Links

The latest from Saskatchewan’s NDP leadership campaign as voting day approaches. – There will be no lack of opportunities to compare the candidates within a debate format, including the NDP’s Prince Albert debate… …as well as SaskForward’s recent Regina forum which was covered by CTV among others. And another party debate will be held in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ed Finn reminds us that Canada has ample resources to bring about positive social change – just as long as we start taxing the wealthy fairly, including by collecting taxes owed on money currently being stashed offshore. – Pierre Fortin reviews the effects of Quebec’s universal affordable child ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Axel von Schubert notes that the effect of Donald Trump’s giveaway to his billionaire buddies will be to turn the U.S. into a tax haven itself. And Michelle Chen discusses how the growth in inequality has been the result of political choices at the behest of the people ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on some of the economic ideas on offer from Ryan Meili and Trent Wotherspoon in Saskatchewan’s NDP leadership campaign. For further reading…– I’ve talked about some of the points of commonality between the candidates’ platforms here.– And the column responds in part to Murray Mandryk’s view that there’s some lack of talk about economic ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Saskatchewan Party’s sad excuse for a climate change strategy (PDF) is really aimed at nothing more than excusing continued carbon pollution. For further reading…– I wrote just a couple of weeks ago about the Saskatchewan public’s strong appetite for real action against climate change – making it all the more embarrassing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Gabriel Zucman discusses how the wealthy currently avoid paying their fair share of taxes – and how to stop them by properly attributing income and ensuring registers of wealth. And Micah White is optimistic that the public response to the Paradise Papers may be to develop lasting ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Ian Welsh neatly summarizes the rules needed to ensure that capitalism doesn’t drown out social good: Capitalism, as it works, destroys itself in a number of ways. For capitalism to work, it must be prevented from doing so: it must not be allowed to form unregulated monopolies ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Paul Wells writes about Justin Trudeau’s natural affinity for the rich and privileged, while the Star remains unduly willing to give him the benefit of the doubt when it comes to fulfilling promises of Indigenous reconciliation and tax fairness. And Chantal Hebert discusses Bill Morneau’s role at the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michal Rozworski highlights how UK Labour’s platform provides for a needed move toward the democratization of economic activity along with an end to gratuitous austerity. And a distinguished group of economists has signed on to support the plan. – Charlie Skelton examines how this year’s Bilderberg conference is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Diane Cardwell points out how carbon politics are threatening renewable energy just at the point where it would win a fair fight against fossil fuels. And J. David Hughes finds that any case for Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline falls apart in the face of realistic assumptions about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Christian Cooper discusses how poverty is like a disease in its effect on a person’s mental and physical well-being. And Andre Picard highlights the reality that in order to address the damage done by centuries of systematic discrimination against Canada’s indigenous people, we need to start making up ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Andrew Jackson discusses the problems with increased corporate concentration of wealth and power – including the need for a response that goes beyond competition policies. In the 1960s, institutional economists like John Kenneth Galbraith described a world of oligopoly in which a few firms, such as the big ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Abi Wilkinson writes about the importance of making social benefits universal in order to reflect a sense of shared interests and purpose: Universal aspects of the welfare state tend to be thought of as the fruit of common endeavour. The NHS tops the list of things that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Brad Wall’s choice to cover up the truth behind the Saskatchewan Party’s Global Transportation Hub scandal – and the most plausible (if still inadequate) explanations for that decision. For further reading…– Again, the latest public revelation was Geoff Leo’s reporting of political pressure to pay inflated prices for land. And Leo also reported ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The Canadian Labour Congress offers its suggestions as to how international trade agreements can be reworked to ensure a more fair global economy. But Bill Curry reports that we’re first more likely to see public interest regulation undermined from within Canada as the provinces sign away their authority ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Masciotra offers a cultural case for a basic income: Reward, purpose and meaning are the abstractions meant to pacify the poor and the working class. The rich have wealth, comfort and pleasure. They also have a universal basic income. In Jacobin, Matt Bruenig recently reported that ...