The Canadian Progressive: Canada Pushes Back Against U.S. Copyright Demands in NAFTA

The third round of negotiations over the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) kicked off in Ottawa on last week. Jeremy Malcolm, the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s expert on the international dimensions of issues such as intellectual property, network neutrality, Internet governance, and trade, explains how Canada is pushing back against U.S. copyright ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada Pushes Back Against U.S. Copyright Demands in NAFTA

The third round of negotiations over the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) kicked off in Ottawa on last week. Jeremy Malcolm, the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s expert on the international dimensions of issues such as intellectual property, network neutrality, Internet governance, and trade, explains how Canada is pushing back against U.S. copyright ...

The Canadian Progressive: Escalating war on net neutrality, Bell Canada wants to block Canadians’ access to pirate websites

Back in April, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) ruled in favour of net neutrality and declared that “Internet service providers should treat data traffic equally to foster consumer choice, innovation and the free exchange of ideas.” Bell Media, one of Canada’s “big three” telecom companies, wants to change all that. The post Escalating ...

The Canadian Progressive: Escalating war on net neutrality, Bell Canada wants to block Canadians’ access to pirate websites

Back in April, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) ruled in favour of net neutrality and declared that “Internet service providers should treat data traffic equally to foster consumer choice, innovation and the free exchange of ideas.” Bell Media, one of Canada’s “big three” telecom companies, wants to change all that. The post Escalating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Stephanie Blankenburg and Richard Kozul-Wright comment on the rise of rent-seeking as a driver of stagnation and inequality. And George Monbiot argues that we shouldn’t let our common wealth be used for the sole benefit of a privileged few: A true commons is managed not for the accumulation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mike Konczal responds to a pathetic attempt to drain the word “neoliberal” of all meaning (which seems to have won favour with Canadian Libs desperately trying to disassociate themselves from their own governing ideology) by discussing its application in both the political and economic spheres. And Steven Hall ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: What Lies Behind Canada’s Net Neutrality Success Story

The Canadian net neutrality success story is notable for how the government, regulator, many companies, and the public have supported net neutrality policies, writes Michael Geist, the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at the University of Ottawa. The post Michael Geist: What Lies Behind Canada’s Net Neutrality Success Story appeared first on ...

The Canadian Progressive: Freeland Admits: U.S. Withdrawal Effectively Kills TPP Trade Deal

This week, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland admitted that the United States’ withdrawal from Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) effectively kills the mega trade deal. The post Freeland Admits: U.S. Withdrawal Effectively Kills TPP Trade Deal appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Piketty discusses our choice between developing models of global trade which actually produce positive results for people, or fueling the fire of Trump-style demogoguery: The main lesson for Europe and the world is clear: as a matter of urgency, globalization must be fundamentally re-oriented. The main challenges ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Baratunde Thurston makes the point that even beyond income and wealth inequality, there’s an obviously unfair distribution of second chances in the U.S. depending on one’s race and class. Denis Campbell reports on the link between poverty and childhood obesity, while Jen St. Denis highlights how poverty ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Danyaal Raza discusses how climate change is manifesting itself in immediate health problems. And John Vidal highlights the latest research on the rapid melting of Arctic ice – making it particularly appalling that Canada has abandoned its main Arctic port to rot. – Elizabeth McSheffrey notes that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Branko Milanovic argues that there’s plenty of reason to be concerned about inequality even if one puts aside a utilitarian comparison of individual needs and benefits: (I)nequality of opportunity affects negatively economic growth (so we now have a negative effect going from my third ground back to ...

Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Glenn Greenwald interviews Alex Cuadros about his new book on how Brazil has been warped politically and economically by the whims of its billionaire class. And PressProgress takes a look at the impact of economic inequality on Canada’s cities. – Sharon Wright examines how draconian restrictions on social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon reminds us why even if we were to (pointlessly) prioritize raw GDP over fair distributions of income and wealth, inequality is bad for economic growth in general: The more we redistribute income and wealth, the more consumption increases, which then increases demand. In turn, this should ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean

Three years after Edward Snowden’s eye-opening state surveillance revelations, it’s time for the Communications Security Establishment and Canada’s other spy agencies to come clean. The post Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Christopher Jencks discusses why the U.S.’ poor are only getting poorer (in part due to the misapprehension that social programs aren’t available) in reviewing Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer’s $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America: In $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: Why Telecom Transparency Reporting in Canada Still Falls Short

Internet law expert Michael Geist explains how Rogers Communications’ recent transparency report “provides new insights into how much – or how little – Canadians know about when their personal information is disclosed to government agencies.” The post Michael Geist: Why Telecom Transparency Reporting in Canada Still Falls Short appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – James Wilt discusses a much-needed effort to map out the connections between fossil fuel corporations. And Bruce Campbell highlights how the resource sector is among the most prominent examples of regulatory capture in Canada. – Meanwhile, Steven Chase notes that even as Stephane Dion tries to excuse the ...

The Canadian Progressive: Budget 2016: Is It The End of a Canadian Digital Strategy?

Internet law expert Michael Geist explains how “Canada’s long road toward a national digital strategy may have come to an end with Budget 2016.” The post Budget 2016: Is It The End of a Canadian Digital Strategy? appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Susan Delacourt writes that the Libs’ federal budget is best seen as requiring an overriding “to be continued”. And Don Martin flags a few points which may prove important later – including what might be an unexplained delay of any electoral reform. – Meanwhile, Teuila Fuatai highlights how ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: The Case Against Canada Ratifying The Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement

This week, Internet and e-commerce law expert, Michael Geist, concluded his illuminating 50-day series on the “trouble with the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP)” by presenting a compelling case against Canada ratifying the trade agreement. The post Michael Geist: The Case Against Canada Ratifying The Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich points out how perpetually more severe corporate rights agreements are destroying the U.S.’ middle class. And Michael Geist concludes his must-read series by summarizing the dangers of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (and making the case against ratifying it). – Jeremy Runnalls writes about the growing movement toward ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Elise Gould studies the continued rise of wage inequality in the U.S. And Teuila Fuatai points out how a strong movement to improve minimum wages and study basic incomes in Canada still has a long way to go to secure a living income anywhere. – Michael Geist’s series ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – PressProgress highlights the disturbingly large number of Canadians spending more than half their income on a restrictively-defined set of basic necessities. And Elaine Power points out what a basic income could do to end food insecurity and improve public health: We know from the social determinants of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sally Goemer writes that extreme inequality is a cause of economic instability for everybody. And Tom Powdrill discusses the importance of organized labour in ensuring the fair sharing of income, while Steven Hill points out the harmful effects of precarious work. – Sheila Regehr and Roderick Benns ...