wmtc: saturday, november 19: evict ford: occupy toronto

EVICT FORD. OCCUPY TORONTO! Rally and marchSaturday, November 19 at 2:00 p.m.Assemble at St. James Park, King Street east between Church and Jarvis In just a few weeks, the Occupy movement has become a global phenomenon, with over 1,400 protests worldwide. In Toronto, a peaceful occupation has been underway at St. James Park, raising demands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Thomas Walkom suggests that the systematic eviction of Occupy camps from Canadian cities may only help the movement to evolve from its first form: City administrations in places like Toronto, Halifax and Vancouver are inadvertently handing demonstrators something they desperately need — a way to honourably end ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Friday reading. – Alice posts the full party spending numbers from May’s election. And the story in fact looks to have been near-maximum spending by each of the four parties then in Parliament – which of course failed to produce much return in two cases. – thwap is understandably skeptical of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dr. Dawg follows up on Stephen Harper’s apology to residential school survivors, and rightly questions how sincere it can be when it’s been followed up with repeated efforts to avoid either actual compensation or (more importantly) efforts to bring First Nations standards of living anywhere close to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Rick Salutin nicely describes what’s behind the “charity” model of top-end wish fulfillment that the Cons are pitching in place of actual social programs: The Old Philanthropy, aside from a few big foundations that now look modest, was embodied in wealthy people who went on boards like the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – If there’s any good news in the Cons’ constant attacks on labour, it’s the growing recognition that workers need to fight back with no less a concerted effort than they’re facing from a hostile government. And the possibility that the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your afternoon reading. – Jim Stanford highlights the Cons’ thoroughly imbalanced view of labour disputes by pointing out that their concern for the economy has been limited to action by workers rather than employers: When employers hold the better cards, as they do in today’s unforgiving labour market, they happily go for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – I’d think it’s long past the time where any informed observer could cling to hope that the Harper Cons see good government as a goal worth pursuing. But Dan Gardner points out the role that Parliament should play if they actually did have some interest in that result: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your weekend. – Of course the ongoing leadership race will do plenty to determine the NDP’s future direction. But for those thinking all will be quiet in the meantime, Nycole Turmel isn’t missing the opportunity to highlight the the Cons’ attacks on workers. – New Scientist traces the connections between 147 ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Abacus’ Canadian polling on the Occupy protests suggests that there’s loads of public sympathy for the view that there’s a need for change in how wealth and power is distributed – with the main concern being whether there’s any viable means available to get that done: Large majorities ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament In Review: October 18, 2011

There hasn’t been as much reporting on the Cons’ re-introduction of copyright legislation as there was at some other points when previous incarnations were up for discussion. But Tuesday, October 18 saw second-reading debate in Parliament on the bill – and a few twists on the issue. The Big Issue Not surprisingly, the discussion of ...

Bill Given: Economic Development Partners with ACFA to Recruit

Did you know that Grande Prairie has the 3rd largest French Association in all of Alberta? Not bad for being the 7th largest city in the province right? The size of our Francophone community is a real asset for our city as it leads to some very important partnerships like the one below. The City’s Economic ...

Bill Given: Economic Development Partners with ACFA to Recruit

Did you know that Grande Prairie has the 3rd largest French Association in all of Alberta? Not bad for being the 7th largest city in the province right? The size of our Francophone community is a real asset for our city as it leads to some very important partnerships like the one below. The City’s Economic ...

Bill Given: Economic Development Partners with ACFA to Recruit

Did you know that Grande Prairie has the 3rd largest French Association in all of Alberta? Not bad for being the 7th largest city in the province right? The size of our Francophone community is a real asset for our city as it leads to some very important partnerships like the one below. The City’s Economic ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament In Review: October 17, 2011

Monday, October 17 saw the Cons cut off debate on second reading of their budget bill. Not surprisingly, the day thus focused in large part on the economy – including some noteworthy pushback against the brand the Cons have spent hundreds of millions of public dollars to promote. The Big Issue That’s right: as the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material to end your weekend. – Doug Cuthand makes the case for First Nations resource ownership as a matter of historical right: When the numbered treaties were negotiated in Saskatchewan in the 1870s, the resources under the ground were never discussed. At the time the government had no idea that Western Canada was a ...

Writings of J. Todd Ring: Occupy Wall Street: The emerging global pro-democracy movement, where it stands, what it means, and where we go from here

The Occupy Wall Street movement, which has already become a global grassroots populist pro-democracy movement, if we have eyes to see, has clearly already won a broad and growing base of support. What is needed now, I believe, is to further clarify and crystallize the issues – and I would say that many people now ...

Accidental Deliberations: Not this again

Mike Moffatt is just the latest to engage in the thoroughly tiresome habit of painting a Nordic-model tax system as a panacea for reducing inequality while utterly ignoring the massive structural differences that make such a model work – not to mention the role that business and government have played in exacerbating those differences in ...

wmtc: open letter from the middle class: two responses to the 53%ers

I have been steadfastly avoiding the so-called 53%, the US right-wing reaction to the Occupy movement, but two responses to their claims caught my eye. Suzy Khimm in the Washington Post takes on the hypocrisy of right-wingers flaunting their status as taxpayers, and the ridiculous notion that the protesters don’t pay taxes. Part of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Trish Hennessy is on board for an Occupy Canada movement: To my friends adopting a wait-and-see approach, I say: The least they can expect from progressives who have been criticizing the system (some since Woodstock) is a little help from their friends. Occupy Wall Street, and the emerging ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your day. – Thomas Walkom points out that the effect of cracking down on peaceful and legal strikes – as the Cons are so determined to do – is to force workers to take more creative steps to make their concerns heard: Canada’s messy labour relations system exists for a reason. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – No, it’s no huge surprise that the Cons are planning to launch systematic attacks against labour as the next step after making it clear they’ll treat any strike or lockout as both illegitimate and entirely the fault of uppity serfs. But it is worth pointing out that ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Just wondering

Glen McGregor at the Ottawa Citizen put an article up yesterday to report on spending by unions on federal election advertising. Using “newly-released financial reports” which are filed with Elections Canada McGregor can tell us, for example: Among the biggest advertisers was the Public Service Alliance of Canada, which spent $134,000, mostly on a radio ...

wmtc: scenes from an occupation, continued

Day 19: Most compelling moment of the night: Watching NYPD taking a girl away, crowd asked her name, she replied, “Troy Davis, Medgar Evers, Emmett Till, Martin Luther King.” Total poise, totally amazing. October 15: Occupy Together Thanks to Jere for the great librarian pic.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Adam Radwanski warns that Ontario’s voters can’t afford to stay home from today’s provincial election. – Jim Stanford calls out the Harper Cons and their right-win echo chamber for their baseless and gratuitous attacks on unions. But given the decades-old trend linking stagnant wages and increasing inequality ...