Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses the apparent destructive belief among Davos’ elites that irrational exuberance and top-heavy economic gains are remotely sustainable: The world is plagued by almost intractable problems. Inequality is surging, especially in the advanced economies. The digital revolution, despite its potential, also carries serious risks for privacy, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how the Republicans’ tax scam is designed for the sole purpose of further enriching their already-wealthy donors, while Theodoric Meyer notes that it also stands to make loads of money for lobbyists. – Jagmeet Singh makes the case for Canada to work on a tax ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Evening Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Brian Bethune interviews Joseph Stiglitz about his longstanding recognition that an international economic system biased toward capital could lay the groundwork for Trump-style demagoguery. – Kristin Annable reports on the Manitoba PCs’ steps toward for-profit health care as an alternative to properly funding and managing the public system. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Joseph Stiglitz writes about the need to learn from past mistakes in order to build a sustainable economy for the future: To someone like me, who has watched trade negotiations closely for more than a quarter-century, it is clear that US trade negotiators got most of what ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Larry Elliott interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the rise of Donald Trump and other demagogues in the wake of public anger over inequality and economic unfairness. And Stiglitz also joins a group of economists calling for an end to austerity in the UK. – Phillip Mendonca-Vieira highlights how rent ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Hugh Mackenzie writes that the biggest problem with the Libs’ closing tax loopholes for private corporations was the failure to push for far more tax fairness: Any tax reform that isn’t just a give away creates winners and losers. If the goal is to make the tax system ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Christopher Thompson highlights how the use of monetary policy to fuel economic growth rather than a progressive fiscal policy alternative has served largely to enrich the already-wealthy. Rachelle Younglai and Murat Yukselir report on Canada’s growing income gap, while Andrew Jackson points out how increased inequality has been ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how the Republican’s trillion-dollar corporate giveaway will only exacerbate inequality without doing anything to help the U.S.’ economy: If inequality was a problem before, enacting the Republicans’ proposed tax reform will make it much worse. Corporations and businesses will be among the big beneficiaries, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rachel Sherman writes about the steps taken by wealthy Americans to hide how much they spend to paper over income inequality: Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Joseph Stiglitz offers a reminder that tax giveaways to the rich and the corporate sector accomplish zero – or worse – when it comes to economic development: If corporate tax reform happens at all, it will be a hodge-podge brokered behind closed doors. More likely is a token ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Daniel Tencer reports on Pierre Kohler and Servaas Storm’s study showing that the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement figures to cost jobs and wages in Canada and across Europe.  – Jim Tankersley explains the initial rise of the stock market since November’s U.S. election, while offering reason to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Sean McElwee offers his take on the crucial failings which have led the U.S. Democrats to their current nadir in which principles and values have been discarded in the pursuit of power they’ve failed to secure. – Mike Konczal and Marshall Steinbaum highlight the importance of effective government ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Danielle Martin highlights how investments in ending poverty including a basic income can improve health outcomes among other key social indicators: Far more than consumption of medical care, income is the strongest predictor of health. Canadians are more likely to die at an earlier age and suffer more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Scott Sinclair and Stuart Trew applaud Wallonia’s principled stance against the CETA. And Joseph Stiglitz discusses the need to set up social and economic systems which actually serve the public good, rather than favouring corporate interests: Where the trade agreements failed, it was not because the US was ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how entrenched inequality and unearned income hurt the economy for everybody: We used to think of there being a trade-off: we could achieve more equality, but only at the expense of overall economic performance. It is now clear that, given the extremes of inequality being ...

Politics and its Discontents: Joseph Stiglitz On The TPP

A very brief video, but a very important message about the dangers of the Investor-State Dispute Settlement mechanism that is a central part of the Trans Pacific Partnership, and something enthusiastically embraced, it would seem, by our ‘new’ government: Recommend this Post

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada: Take On Wall Street is both the name and the feisty attitude of a nationwide campaign that a coalition ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada: Take On Wall Street is both the name and the feisty attitude of a nationwide campaign that a coalition ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Nora Loreto slams the Wynne Libs’ “red tape” gimmick, while highlighting the need for people to claim a voice in rules largely intended to protect them as workers and consumers: One person’s red tape is another person’s health and safety, but Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne hopes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joseph Stiglitz writes about the continuing need to rein in the excesses of corporate-dominated globalization: The failure of globalization to deliver on the promises of mainstream politicians has surely undermined trust and confidence in the “establishment.” And governments’ offers of generous bailouts for the banks that had brought ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joseph Stiglitz writes about the political consequences of economic policies which have siphoned wealth to the lucky few, and writes that it’s long past time to start challenging the corporate power which has made citizens into an afterthought: (L)arge portions of the population have not been doing well. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Ben Schiller talks to Joseph Stiglitz about the link between technology and inequality – and particularly the lack of current incentives to work on improving standards of living rather than capturing windfalls. And Don Pittis suggests that we should focus on building up new ideas, rather than constantly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – GOOD Magazine neatly sums up what the world would look like on the scale of 100 people – and how patently unfair wealth inequality looks in that context: – Lawrence Mishel and David Cooper point out that a $15 minimum wage is entirely in keeping with actual economic ...

Politics and its Discontents: Will The Trudeau Government Ignore The Warnings?

As pointed out by The Mound, Joseph Stigliz has issued a dire warning to Canada about the dangers of the TPP (Trans Pacific Partnership); essentially, it will enrich the few at the expense of the many. As well, he has warned about two other grave dangers the pact poses for our country: The controversial but ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford offers a warning to Australia about Canada’s history of gratuitous corporate tax giveaways: (S)uccessive cuts reduced combined Canadian corporate taxes (including provincial rates, which also fell in several provinces) from near 50 per cent of pre-tax income in the early 1980s, to 26 per cent ...