Accidental Deliberations: On costly considerations

I’ve previously pointed out that there might be much less than met the eye to Brightenview’s much-trumpeted “ground-breaking” at the Global Transportation Hub. But while there’s now some dispute as to what work is being done at the Brightenview site, I’d think we should be particularly concerned about the terms involved if the GTH project ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Global Alliance for Tax Justice examines the most common tax evasion practices used to allow the wealthy to avoid paying their fair share. And Desmond Cohen points out how our current estimates of inequality underestimate exactly how much is being hidden. –  David Macdonald anticipates and criticizes ...

Montreal Simon: Will Donald Trump Be The One Who Finishes Off Kellie Leitch?

As we all know, Kellie Leitch tried her best during the Con leadership race to make us believe that she was Canada's Donald or Donalda Trump.Denouncing the One-Percent even though she's one of them. And ranting and raving about immigrants and refugees.It didn't do her any good of course. She finished in sixth place, behind even Brad ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses UK Labour’s true social democratic platform as a model for progressive parties around the globe. And Simon Wren-Lewis points out that contrary to the spin of opponents and uninformed presumptions of much of the media, Labour’s plan is entirely affordable. – Meanwhile, as part ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about social assistance in Canada

I’ve just written a blog post about social assistance in Canada. Points raised in the blog post include the following: -Social assistance has two contradictory objectives: 1) to give people enough money to live on; and 2) to not give people enough money to live on. -Very few immigrants receive social assistance (relative to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Linda McQuaig discusses the need to fight fake news about Canada’s health care system (and the corporate raiders trying to amplify it): (I)t was with some pleasure last week that I watched as a Republican congressman tried to insist that Canadians routinely flock to the U.S. for health ...

The Canadian Progressive: The Mental and Physical Trauma of “Dreamers” Living With Deportation Threats

Since Trump’s election, the future of Daniela Vargas and more than 750,000 recipients of former president Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program has been uncertain. Most of them now endure mental and physical trauma as a result of lingering deportation threats. The post The Mental and Physical Trauma of “Dreamers” Living With Deportation Threats ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Ryan discusses the precarity facing far too many UK residents who are a single missed bill payment away from financial disaster: There are now 19 million people in this country living below the minimum income standard (an income required for what the wider public view as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Ryan discusses the precarity facing far too many UK residents who are a single missed bill payment away from financial disaster: There are now 19 million people in this country living below the minimum income standard (an income required for what the wider public view as ...

The Canadian Progressive: Trump’s border plan for Canada? So far, not a wall

The fist meeting between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President Donald Trump seems to have made it clear that there will be no wall between the 8,891 km Canada-US border. The post Trump’s border plan for Canada? So far, not a wall appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Harvard Law School Director Deborah Anker’s Letter To Justin Trudeau Addresses Impact Of Trump’s Executive Orders On Asylum Seekers

Harvard Law School Director Deborah Anker’s letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the impact of Trump’s executive orders on asylum seekers. According to Anker, the orders are “based on erroneous assumptions about the criminality and extremist tendency of the immigrant population.” The post Harvard Law School Director Deborah Anker’s Letter To Justin Trudeau Addresses ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we shouldn’t be impressed with our political leaders’ reactions to the bigotry on display in Donald Trump’s Muslim ban and the Quebec City mosque shooting – but should see the popular response as a far more useful starting point for progress. For further reading…– I posted here on how Brad Wall has ...

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

So which of these quotes conflating immigration with terrorism is from the bigoted autocrat provoking protests around the world for his widely-acknowledged lack of human decency… [The leader] is calling for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering [his country] until our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on.…[The leader] stated, “Without ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Terry Glavin argues that Canada’s response to Donald Trump’s Muslim ban needs to consist of more than the platitudes offered by Justin Trudeau, while Tom Parkin and Chantal Hebert point out that even Trudeau’s words to date have unduly downplayed Trump’s dangers. And Andrew Coyne writes about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic offers his take on how the U.S.’ version of liberalism paved the way for Donald Trump and his ilk both by buying into corporatist assumptions about success, and by treating electoralism as the basis for political organization: In economics, liberalism espoused “neo-liberalism” which was the ...

Scripturient: Kellie Leitch’s politics of division

They’re not like us. They’re not our religion. They’re not our colour. They don’t speak our language. They don’t dress like us. They don’t eat like us. They don’t drive like us, shop like us, read like us, walk like us. We need to control them. Deport them. Jail them. Make them convert. Make them ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mariana Mazzucato makes the case for a progressive message of shared wealth creation: A progressive economic agenda must have at its heart an understanding of wealth creation as a collective process. Yes, businesses are wealth creators, but they do not create wealth alone. Workers, public institutions and civil ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michael Harris argues that it’s long past time for the Trudeau Libs to start living up to their oft-repeated promise of real change – rather than merely slapping a friendlier face on the same old regressive Con policies. – Tom Parkin notes that Canada’s working class has been ...

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: In diversity, there is strength

World-renowned Canadian scientist, broadcaster, activist and author David Suzuki explains how life has “fluctuated and flourished because of the resilience conferred by diversity” over millennia. The post David Suzuki: In diversity, there is strength appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: WHAT BREXIT MEANS TO UK CAREGIVERS AND WHY POLICY MATTERS EVERYWHERE

News feeds are awash in stories of the BREXIT referendum debacle in the UK.  Weak and deceitful campaigns on both sides of the argument about whether to leave the European Union or not resulted in a surprise victory by the ‘Leavers’, prompting the Prime Minister to resign.  The nation is wringing its hands, lamenting ‘what ...

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: WHAT BREXIT MEANS TO UK CAREGIVERS AND WHY POLICY MATTERS EVERYWHERE

News feeds are awash in stories of the BREXIT referendum debacle in the UK.  Weak and deceitful campaigns on both sides of the argument about whether to leave the European Union or not resulted in a surprise victory by the ‘Leavers’, prompting the Prime Minister to resign.  The nation is wringing its hands, lamenting ‘what ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andre Picard writes about the devastating effects of widespread social isolation, particularly given its connection to poverty: All told, it is estimated that about six million Canadians live an isolated existence. We have an epidemic of loneliness, and the principal underlying cause is poverty. If you’re poor, you’re ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Brent Patterson points out the continued dangers of extrajudicial challenges to laws under the CETA. And John Jacobs examines (PDF) the likelihood that reduced tariffs under the Trans-Pacific Partnership would mostly push Canada toward further dependence on resource extraction. – Ken Jacobs, Zohar Perla, Ian Perry and Dave ...

Song of the Watermelon: Vancouver Sun Letter

I have a letter on The Vancouver Sun’s website (online only, it would appear) replying to a ridiculous op-ed piece that blames the high cost of housing on “mass immigration.” My response is restrained in both tone and word count, but suffice it to say I disagree with the op-ed writer’s argument. To read my ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrea Germanos follows up on the IMF’s realization that handing free money and power to corporations does nothing for the economy as it affects people’s lives. And Susie Cagle examines the role of tech money – like other massive accumulations of wealth – in exacerbating inequalities in ...