Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how a misguided war against “red tape” contributed to the deaths of dozens in the Grenfell Tower fire – and how we’re at risk of becoming casualties as well. For further reading…– Details about the UK’s obsession with red tape can be found in archives including the home page and housing and construction ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Nina Shapiro comments on the price of privatizing public goods. And George Monbiot weighs in on how the Grenfell Tower fire confirms that what corporatist politicians deride as “red tape” is in fact vital protection for people: For years successive governments have built what they call a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ellie Mae O’Hagan writes about Jeremy Corbyn’s much-needed work in addressing the loss of hope by young people in the UK: For the first time in a good few years, I’ve stopped worrying about money. I can imagine living somewhere nice without having to move to another country. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Tim Bousquet writes that the push toward “social entrepreneurship” ultimately serves to undermine the importance of the public good: My real worry here is that the phrase “social enterprise” is the softer, feel-good end of the push for increased entrepreneurship, which is always promoted as good thing, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your long weekend reading. – Cole Stangler interviews Raquel Garrido about the political critique behind Jean-Luc Melenchon’s emerging presidential campaign – and it sounds equally applicable in Canada: One of the reasons why the current regime is lacking consent in French society is because the process for electing officials allows them to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Olive offers his take on what a basic income should look like – and is optimistic that Ontario’s ongoing experiment should hit the mark: A UBI would be pointless in the absence of existing supports. In the Ontario pilot projects, the payout for a single person ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Mishel and Heidi Shierholz write that we shouldn’t let governments and businesses off the hook for regressive policy choices by blaming technology. And Ben Tarnoff points out that any effects on the distribution of income and wealth can be dealt with through a fair tax system. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Mishel and Heidi Shierholz write that we shouldn’t let governments and businesses off the hook for regressive policy choices by blaming technology. And Ben Tarnoff points out that any effects on the distribution of income and wealth can be dealt with through a fair tax system. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Tom Parkin points out that neither austerity nor isolationism offers any real solution to improve Canada’s fiscal and economic standing. And Rob Carrick highlights what should be the most worrisome form of debt – being the increased consumer debt taken on to allow people to keep spending in ...

OPSEU Diablogue: Grassroots activism is the key to worker health and safety

In October 2016, the OPSEU Mental Health Division hosted a two-day conference in Toronto on “Violence in health care and mental health facilities.” Bob DeMatteo, a renowned health and safety activist and retired Senior Health and Safety Officer for OPSEU, … Continue reading →

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Mary O’Hara notes that even a relatively modest and incomplete set of progressive policies has created some important movement toward reducing poverty. And conversely, Caroline Mortimer writes that child poverty is exploding under the Conservative majority government in the UK. – Dean Beeby reports on the cause ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Branko Milanovic examines whether the U.S.’ tax system is actually progressive all the way to the top of the income spectrum – and finds that there’s not enough data about the treatment of the extremely wealthy to be sure. And Robert Cribb and Marco Chown Oved discuss ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Don Pittis writes that it will take far more than words and sentiments to reverse the trend of growing income inequality. Elaine Power points out that Ontario’s social assistance programs – like those elsewhere – far fall short of meeting basic human needs. And Christopher Mackie reminds us ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Paolo Giuliano and Antonio Spilimbergo study (PDF) how the economic conditions an individual’s youth influence enduring values – and find that the experience of an economic shock tends to lead to a greater appreciation of a fair redistribution of resources: Consistent with theories of social psychology, this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – William G. Gale, Hilary Gelfond and Aaron Krupkin examine the evidence as to the effects of upper-class tax cuts, and find that they serve no purpose but to concentrate wealth and power in the hands of those who already have the most: [Donald Trump’s economic] plan won’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Norman Farrell highlights how following the reversal of the HST transition, B.C. businesses haven’t given up on their goal of making sure that only individuals pay consumption taxes. – Jordan Press and Lee Berthiaume report on the lack of any recent effort to ensure that federal government buildings ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Thomas Walkom discusses Mel Hurtig’s philosophy of economic nationalism, while noting that Canada stands out as an exception in lacking a strong movement toward greater internal planning and economic control. And Maude Barlow looks back at Hurtig’s work, while Melissa Fundira reports that the Libs are trying ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Coyne argues that the Senate’s role in overruling elected representatives – which only seems to be growing under the Trudeau Libs – represents an affront to democracy. And Duncan Cameron has some suggestions beyond proportional representation as to how our electoral system can better live up ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Michael Klare writes about the future direction of the oil industry – which looks to involve cashing out quickly than building anything lasting: At the beginning of this century, many energy analysts were convinced that we were at the edge of the arrival of “peak oil”; a peak, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Duncan Brown discusses the connection between precarious work and low productivity. And Sara Mojtehedzadeh examines how Ontario’s workers’ compensation system is pushing injured individuals into grinding poverty by setting impossible requirements for claimants. – Jim Balsillie worries that the Trans-Pacific Partnership will only increase the tendency of profits ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne reminds us that wealth will never be fairly distributed without public action to ensure it doesn’t get concentrated with the lucky few: More and more of the income pie is going to the top one per cent — who are soaking up a bigger and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon highlights why we need governments at all levels to be working on stimulating Canada’s economy, not looking to cut back: The bank was referring to what economists call “secular stagnation”: a long-period of very low growth, with all its obvious consequences on unemployment and income inequality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Roderick Benns interviews Scott Santens about the effect of a basic income: Benns: Why is the concept of a basic income guarantee so important at this point in our societal development? Santens: We’re living in a paradox of absurdity, where we’ve created truly incredible levels of technology, growing ...