Accidental Deliberations: On full pictures

I’ve previously pointed out the obvious bad faith behind the Saskatchewan Party’s attempt (PDF) to monetize existing agricultural practices as a substitute for actually reducing greenhouse gas emissions – and particularly the one-sided nature of that plan: How we grow our crops, harvest our forests and protect our vital water systems will be critically important ...

Politics and its Discontents: The Ball Is In Our Court

I am well past the age when I feel any real hope for the future of our species. Far too many of us are content to define our lives by the ease and conveniences afforded by technology, technology that is leaving us with an increasingly unstable environment and climate. And now, of course, we are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Amy Remeikis reports on new research showing how educational inequality translates into an even wider economic gap. – Hannah Johnston and Chris Land-Kazlauskas examine (PDF) the gig economy and the need for workers to be able to organize around it. But Rebecca Moss discusses another of Donald ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Mitchell Thompson discusses the absurdity of setting up Canada’s banks for collapses and bailouts, rather than ensuring they serve the public interest. And Colin Butler reports on CUPW’s continued push for a postal banking option to provide better service to far more people and communities. – Barry ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Boundary Dam carbon capture and storage project – cited incessantly by Scott Moe and the Saskatchewan Party as a substitute for a climate change action plan – has in fact proven a costly failure both as a power source and a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. For further reading…– I’ve ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ann Pettifor rightly questions the supposed gains from austerity in belatedly balancing budgets only at the expense of avoidable social devastation. And the CCPA documents the billions of dollars in lost assets and thousands of jobs slashed in Saskatchewan even when Brad Wall was promising not to attack ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – J.W. Mason reviews Yanis Varoufakis’ Adults in the Room with a focus on how damaging austerity was forced on Greece by other governments. And Jan Rovny comments on the need for Europe’s left-wing parties to adapt to the precarious economy and evolving social structures. – Laurie Monsebraaten reports ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Nick Falvo highlights some of the most important proposals in the CCPA’s alternative federal budget (parentheticals omitted): 3. Introduce a national pharmacare program. This proposal would help address the fact that many Canadians simply cannot access prescription medication; it would also result in reduced premiums paid by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Family Day reading. – Gloria Galloway reports on Jagmeet Singh’s strong case for fair tax revenues as a key highlight from the NDP’s federal convention: In his speech to delegates, Mr. Singh lamented income inequality, urged the protection of pensions, called for publicly funded pharmacare and dental and eye care, and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joe Romm discusses new research showing that man-made greenhouse gas emissions have ended an 11,000-year era of climate stability. – Thomas Walkom points out the contradictions in Justin Trudeau’s declaration that there will be no federal climate policy without new pipelines. And David Climenhaga writes about the complete ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Nathan Akehurst writes that the Carillion collapse was just the tip of the iceberg in the corporatization and destruction of the UK’s public services. And Neil Macdonald points out that the Trudeau Libs are pitching privatized infrastructure as easy money for investors – and that they can ...

The Disaffected Lib: Nat Gas Killed Coal. Now It’s Time to Kill Off Nat Gas.

Natural gas remains widely seen as a helpful “bridge fuel” during the transition from high carbon fossil fuels to alternative, clean energy. That myth is based on end use comparisons. Natural gas power plants emit much less greenhouse gas than coal-fired power plants, ergo nat gas is cleaner. Here’s the thing. That’s a lie, one ...

Politics and its Discontents: Facing Hypocrisy

Last month, I read an article by the redoubtable George Monbiot that left me both shaken and, for a period of time, quite depressed. It forced me to face some unpleasant and inconvenient truths about people like me, and left me with the realization that when all is said and done, I am a hypocrite. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – PressProgress points out Statistics Canada’s latest numbers on Canada’s extreme wealth disparity – with 60% of the population owning only 10% of the wealth while a lucky few amass gigantic fortunes.  – Jordan Brennan discusses how a lack of labour conflict has led to low levels of both ...

Politics and its Discontents: Note To Justin And Rachel

Please explain again why your insistence that we need to build more pipelines is valid, given these facts: A new world record price for electricity set earlier this month signals a radical disruption in global energy markets — and Canada, whose economy was once powered by some of the world’s cheapest electricity, will not escape ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Saskatchewan Party’s climate obstruction is entirely out of touch with the province’s citizens. For further reading…– Abacus Data’s national poll of attitudes toward climate change policy is here, with the separate chart pointing out the views of Saskatchewan and Alberta respondents looking to be particularly significant.– And again, James Wilt has ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ashifa Kassam writes about the elements of Canada’s health care system which call for ambitious improvement rather than imitation: “I think privatisation is a major threat to public health care in Canada,” said Natalie Mehra of the Ontario Health Coalition. Earlier this year, her organisation released a ...

The Canadian Progressive: Can emissions shrink while the Canadian economy grows?

David Suzuki asks: Is the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change framework correct in assuming Canada can reduce greenhouse gas emissions while growing its economy? The post Can emissions shrink while the Canadian economy grows? appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Leslie McCall and Jennifer Richeson offer another look at what happens when Americans are properly informed about the level of inequality in their country: What effect did this information have? First, more respondents came to believe that “coming from a wealthy family” and “having well educated parents” were ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Amira Elghawaby comments on the loss of empathy in Canadian politics – particularly due to a disproportionate focus on the perceived self-interest of a narrow group of upper-middle-class swing voters, rather than speaking to and about the people with the greatest need for collective voice: A few ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Crawford Kilian writes that Donald Trump’s presidency is merely a symptom of the wider disease of undue deference to wealth. And Matt Karp comments on the need for progressives to identify the problem rather than soft-peddling class divisions: What distinguished the Bernie Sanders campaign more than any other ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Kate Aronoff writes that in addition to being a political loser, corporate-friendly centrism is extremely dangerous in allowing for far less than the effort we should be putting into fighting climate change. And Tess Riley reports on new research that only a hundred companies are responsible for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Damian Carrington reports on new research showing that the actual change in temperature caused by greenhouse gas emissions may be larger than anticipated in even the most cautious forecasts to date. And Chloe Farand highlights France’s plan to rein in its contribution to climate change by banning ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Naomi Klein highlights how capital and power combine to turn disasters into profit-making opportunities – while noting that the Trump presidency is just such a disaster. And Linda McQuaig discusses why we should see the income tax and other collective funding mechanisms as an important step in nation-building. ...

Alberta Politics: Environmentalist Tzeporah Berman, who gave as good as she got, leaves Alberta oilsands advisory role

PHOTOS: Former Oil Sands Advisory Group member Tzeporah Berman. Below: Alberta Premier Rachel Notley, Progressive Conservative Legislative Caucus Leader Ric McIver, and Environment Minister Shannon Phillips. Tzeporah Berman, the high-profile environmentalist who became a lightning rod for right-wing fury at Alberta’s NDP, is no longer advising Premier Rachel Notley’s Government. A Canadian Press story yesterday ...