Views from the Beltline: A carbon tax—an ethical imperative

The following article was published in the Calgary Herald on January 7th under my byline. You can read it here, along with comments, or below. A carbon tax allows us to clean up after ourselvesLike most people, one of the life lessons I learned at my mother’s knee was that if you make a mess, ...

Views from the Beltline: A carbon tax—an ethical imperative

The following article was published in the Calgary Herald on January 7th under my byline. You can read it here, along with comments, or below. A carbon tax allows us to clean up after ourselvesLike most people, one of the life lessons I learned at my mother’s knee was that if you make a mess, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Substandard

There’s plenty of ugly news coming out about the continued problems with Brad Wall’s pet carbon capture and storage project – including thoroughly unimpressive output numbers, and payouts to Cenovus to make up for a failure to deliver the carbon dioxide it’s supposed to be capturing. But perhaps even more worrisome than the project’s well-known ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Dani Rodrik writes that today’s brand of trade agreement has little to do with economic theory as opposed to political power: What purpose do trade agreements really serve? The answer would seem obvious: countries negotiate trade agreements to achieve freer trade. But the reality is considerably more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – John McDonnell outlines a progressive alternative to neoliberal economic policy: The increasing automation of jobs, reduced dependence on carbon fuels, artificial intelligence and the so-called gig economy have provoked understandable anger among many workers whose jobs are under threat. More generally, concerns about the effect on the labour market are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dani Rodrik discusses the growing public opposition to new corporate-dominated trade deals based on the lessons we’ve learned from previous ones: Instead of decrying people’s stupidity and ignorance in rejecting trade deals, we should try to understand why such deals lost legitimacy in the first place. I’d ...

Politics and its Discontents: This Sounds Promising

Whether this will turn out to be another idea that holds great promise but then comes to nothing will only be known, I guess, in the future, but it does sound promising: The danger of the ever-increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Earth’s atmosphere has become one of the most pressing issues of our ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Joel Wood highlights the social cost of carbon as a crucial reason to work on reducing greenhouse gas emissions rather than insisting on doing the absolute least the rest of the world will tolerate. And needless to say, Brad Wall’s idea of an argument for the position that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Cindy Blackstock offers a reminder of Canada’s long and shameful history of discrimination against First Nations children. And Donna Ferreiro takes a look at some of the faces of the Sixties Scoop which saw Indigenous children separated from their families due solely to racial and cultural prejudice. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Larry Elliott writes that the public is rightly frustrated with an economic model designed to shift money to those who already have the most – and that progressive parties in particular need to offer a meaningful alternative: The belief on the left was that 2008 sounded the death ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – In The Public Interest studies how the privatization of services leads to increased inequality: In the Public Interest’s analysis of recent government contracting identifies five ways in which government privatization disproportionately hurts poor individuals and families… Creation of new user fees: The creation of new user fees to ...

Carbon49 – Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Canadians Prefer Businesses with Green Vehicles

Should your company cars and long distance fleets go green? 90% of Canadians believe businesses should reduce transportation related emissions and 82% feel having an environmentally friendly fleet is an important factor when choosing vendors. I look at the findings to see if turning your fleet green may make business sense. Commissioned by Bullfrog Power ...

Politics and its Discontents: We Can’t Have It Both Ways

Despite Justin Trudeau’s sunny assurances that meeting greenhouse gas emission reduction goals and pipeline expansion are not mutually exclusive, most people, if they think about it at all, will see such a position as both risible and impossible. That is certainly the assessment of J. David Hughes, who writes that we can’t have it both ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Sherri Torjman discusses how the the gig economy is based mostly on evading protections for workers – and how the both employment law and social programs need to catch up: Much of the labour market is morphing into freelance or gigs. More and more Canadians are becoming ...

Carbon49 – Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Nestlé Creating Shared Value Through Environmental Sustainability

Nestlé mark their 150th anniversary with key commitments to creating shared value in Canadian society. I look into their goals and progress as well as how their strategy of creating shared value differs from other corporate social responsibility programs. Found in Nestlé’s global report and Canadian report are their social commitments on nutrition, health and ...

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Eating less meat will reduce Earth’s heat

Canada environmentalist David Suzuki: “The environment and climate would benefit substantially if more people gave up or at least cut down on meat and animal products”. The post David Suzuki: Eating less meat will reduce Earth’s heat appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Johnna Montgomerie makes the case to treat austerity as a failed experiment. But Laura Basu points out that misleading coverage of economic and fiscal news has led far too many people to see the damage done by austerity as originating from other sources. – Meanwhile, the Economist examines ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Ben Schiller talks to Joseph Stiglitz about the link between technology and inequality – and particularly the lack of current incentives to work on improving standards of living rather than capturing windfalls. And Don Pittis suggests that we should focus on building up new ideas, rather than constantly ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Conference Board of Canada’s environmental report card – and the conclusions we should draw from both Saskatchewan’s last-place finish, and the typically appalling response from the Wall government. For further reading…– Brendan Haley discusses the steps needed to reach a cleaner and more equitable economy – featuring a focus on transitioning how ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Broadbent, Michal Hay and Emilie Nicolas theorize that Canada’s left is on the rise. Matt Karp takes a look at the policy preferences of younger American voters, including a strong willingness to fund far better social programs than are currently available. And N+1 responds to the rise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Bill McKibben offers his take on the news that the entire northern hemisphere has reached two degrees Celsius above its normal temperature level, including the increased urgency it creates in reining in climate change. And Bruce Johnstone writes about Brad Wall’s losing battle to keep promoting the ...

Accidental Deliberations: On gross excesses

It shouldn’t be news to anybody interested in climate change (and the Wall government’s role in exacerbating it) that Saskatchewan has a shameful track record in polluting our atmosphere. But Joseph Heath summarizes just how embarrassed we should be: Keep in mind that the general target we want to get to, globally, is around 2 ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Joseph Stiglitz comments on how the Trans-Pacific Partnership looks to make democracy subordinate to corporate interests: The US concluded secret negotiations on what may turn out to be the worst trade agreement in decades, the so-called Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and now faces an uphill battle for ratification, as ...

Carbon49 - Sustainability for Canadian businesses: Green Energy Pioneer Bullfrog Power Talks Energy Landscape

Bullfrog Power is an inspiring Canadian green energy success story. Since 2005 Bullfrog pioneers in providing easy solutions for large businesses like Walmart, Unilever, and RBC as well as individuals to power their homes and offices with 100% renewable energy. At their tenth anniversary I talk to CEO Ron Seftel on how the green energy landscape has evolved ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jordan Brennan studies the relationship between corporate taxes and the economy, and finds that the promise of growth in exchange for corporate giveaways has proven entirely illusory. – Andy McSmith looks at another of the consequences of the trend toward corporate control, as the UK has seen the ...