Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Scott Clark and Peter DeVries point out that with interest rates still at historically low levels, Canada would be far better off funding infrastructure for itself rather than locking itself into privatized structures: But that is not true at all at the federal level.  The federal government funds ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Murray Dobbin argues that the Trudeau Libs’ response (or lack thereof) to wealthy tax cheats will tell us what we most need to know about their plans for Canada. – Meanwhile, Tonda MacCharles reports on Justin Trudeau’s plans to abandon Canada’s longstanding commitment (however neglected in practice) ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Lonnie Golden studies the harm done to workers by irregular schedules. And Matt Bruening comments on how Missouri, Kansas and other states are passing draconian restrictions on benefits by trying to get the middle class to envy the poor. – Meanwhile, Scott Santens expands on the connection between ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Dennis Raphael and Toba Bryant write about the devastating health effects of income inequality in Canada: Imagine the response, from industry, government and the public, if a plane was crashing every day. If there were something that killed as many people in a day as this kind of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star criticizes the Harper Cons’ selective interest in international cooperation – with war and oil interests apparently ranking as the only areas where the Cons can be bothered to work with other countries. And Catherine Porter reports that the Cons have demonstrated their actual attitude toward global ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, questioning whether Canadians share Stephen Harper’s newly-professed aspiration to spend tens of billions of dollars more every year to prop up U.S. and U.K. military contractors. For further reading…– David Pugliese reported on this week’s NATO summit. – NATO’s most recent spending calculations are here (see PDF link), showing that Canada currently spends about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – John Ibbitson reports that the Cons’ obvious priorities have finally been made explicit: as far as they’re concerned, the sole purpose of international diplomacy is to serve the corporate sector. And Ian Smillie documents how the Cons hijacked Canada’s foreign aid program (while signalling that the same path ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Agence France-Presse reports that even the IMF has reached the conclusion that higher taxes on wealthy citizens are a necessary part of competent economic management – even as the Harper Cons and other right-wing governments keep trying to peddle trickle-down economics to everybody’s detriment. – Susan Delacourt ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Murray Dobbin writes about the crisis of extreme capitalism: (T)he “free economy” romanticized by Friedman and his ilk is anything but. Completely dominated by giant corporations whose wealth outstrips all but the richest nations, economic freedom does not exist for anyone else, including the vast majority of businesses ...

bastard.logic: I’m Not Sayin’ (I’m Just Sayin’)

The following nugget was buried at the bottom of a follow-up CP report on how CIDA helped fund the Ugandan aid work of the virulently anti-gay Crossroads Christian Communications (in full PR damage control mode now that its homobigoted Evangelical slip is showing) to the tune of half a million dollars last year: Francois Audet, director of the Montreal-based Canadian ...

bastard.logic: Big Pharma Cashing In On Global South Vaccination?

The Graun: Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), the Nobel prize-winning organisation working on the frontline in remote and conflict areas, says vaccines bought with UK and other donor governments’ money cost too much and are not designed for the needs of hot and impoverished countries. When the pot of money subsidising the high prices of western ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Friday reading. – In response to the Fraser Institute’s latest attempt to foment panic (to be used as an excuse to attack public programs and hand yet more free money to corporations), Trish Hennessy explains the province’s choices in terms anybody should be able to understand: The austerity experiment has been ...

Trashy's World: Canada’s number one buffoon…

… is angling for a Senate seat, it appears. Although I don’t think he has the intelligence to engage in such strategic thinking. Regardless of whether his views are on or off-base, he-of-no-taste should stick to hockey and should shut up about the country’s foreign aid policies. He knows next to nothing about this issue. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Steven Hoffman highlights the Cons’ utter refusal to recognize that foreign aid – as defined by global treaties – doesn’t mean the same thing as corporate giveaways: Reports and commentary on Canada’s new foreign aid policy reveal the extent to which international development means different things to different ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Martin Kirk discusses the role governments play in allowing and facilitating the extraction of a substantial portion of the world’s wealth to tax havens (h/t to thwap): Tax theft is endemic all over the world. It is organised through an intricate system of tax havens; the PR around ...

Politics and Entertainment: Canadian aid to Palestinians may be on chopping block after UN vote

For bully boy Baird, international front man for the Harper Regime, to consider cutting off or freezing aid to Palestine is unadulterated, childish vindictiveness should he choose to follow through with such a threat (with apologies to children everywhere). How can such a wicked act be construed even remotely as a form of diplomacy? Want to ...

Politics and Entertainment: A Call for Direct Action: Is it Worthy of Consideration?

Your Anon News • A CALL FOR DIRECT ACTION  Although there are facets of this perspective that are highly debatable, as many of the comments on Tumblr  reveal, this is an intriguing argument not without some merit because aspects of it are increasingly applicable to Canada as we continue to live under the repressive yoke ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Thomas Walkom comments on the Cons’ preference for low-wage, no-rights immigrant labour as a means of avoiding good jobs for Canadians: Theoretically, temporary work visas are supposed to be reserved for those with unique skills. But increasingly, the notion of skill has been stretched to the extreme. In ...

CANADIAN PROGRESSIVE WORLD: Bev Oda’s Sweet Double Resignation

GOOD RIDDANCE! The minister responsible for the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) has resigned from both Stephen Harper’s cabinet and her elected position as Conservative MP for the Ontario riding of Durham. The controversy-plagued Oda announced her resignation this morning without giving a clear explanation. No doubt, the resignation is a bitter pre-emptive strike against Harper’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – May 4, 2012

Friday, May 4 saw a relatively short day of debate on the omnibus budget bill – but with a few twists on the discussion seen to date. The Big Issue Claude Gravelle noted that the range of major changes in C-38 goes far beyond the environment alone. Ted Hsu wondered why the Cons slashed the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – May 4, 2012

Friday, May 4 saw a relatively short day of debate on the omnibus budget bill – but with a few twists on the discussion seen to date. The Big Issue Claude Gravelle noted that the range of major changes in C-38 goes far beyond the environment alone. Ted Hsu wondered why the Cons slashed the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: April 30, 2012

Monday, April 30 featured discussion of two opposition motions dealing with the federal government’s responsibility to ensure the safety of Canadians. And on both fronts, the Cons went out of their way to disclaim any such role for our public servants. The Big Issue Jack Harris started off the safety theme with a motion to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 25, 2012

Wednesday, April 25 saw one of the more noteworthy economic debates we’ve seen in the current session of Parliament, as a former-PC-turned-Liberal raised the issue of income inequality to a noteworthy response from the Harper Cons. The Big Issue Scott Brison presented what should have been a relatively non-controversial motion – calling not even for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 3, 2012

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 saw the final day of debate at second reading of the Cons’ budget – and once again featured plenty of work by Peter Julian to introduce the types of perspectives the Cons would never tolerate if they could avoid it. The Big Issue Once again, Julian focused largely on bringing forward ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – March 30, 2012

Friday, March 30 was the first day of Peter Julian’s budget filibuster. But while it accomplished its goal of avoiding several hours worth of Con talking points, was there much to take from Julian’s own comments? The Big Issue Well, let’s highlight a few of his more noteworthy observations. First, on the Cons’ own plan ...