Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Stephen Metcalf discusses the meaning and effect of neoliberalism: “(N)eoliberalism” is more than a gratifyingly righteous jibe. It is also, in its way, a pair of eyeglasses. Peer through the lens of neoliberalism and you see more clearly how the political thinkers most admired by Thatcher and Reagan ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Plastic Is Out of Hand

Plastic almost always ends up as waste within a year or two of its production. We’re making too much of it also, at an increasing pace. “Of the 8.3 billion metric tonnes of virgin plastics ever made, half was made just in the last 13 years,” Geyer said. “Between 2004 and 2015 we made as ...

Canadian Dimension: Smoke over the skies of North America is another climate change warning

Photo by Jonathan Hayward For nearly two weeks, beginning August 1, the skies over Vancouver were filled with the smoke of forest fires burning in central and northern British Columbia. The smoke from those fires and others farther afield has waxed and waned over much of North America since July. Three days ago, Vancouver and ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Inconceivable! His Dinner with Chomsky

Wallace Shawn sat down for a chat with Noam Chomsky, and here’s what they talked about – slightly abridged and loosely quoted (for clarification purposes) with links. It’s a great recharge for activists! Shawn – Many people are shocked to see the president is now a cruel, brutal, greedy type of a man, and this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Roderick Benns interviews Ryan Meili about the value of a basic income in freeing people from perpetual financial stress. And Doug Cameron reminds us that we have a choice whether to show empathy toward people facing homelessness – even if far too many forces try to push us ...

Things Are Good: Save the Peatlands, Save the Planet

When it comes to carbon storage you can’t beat peatlands. They store tons of carbon and clean the air so efficiently that we ought to protect them way better than we currently do. Indeed, peatlands are on the decline – that’s not good. Fortunately there is research in how best to protect the peatlands from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jerry Dias writes that corporate greed is the common thread in numerous stories about Canadian workers being left without jobs or support. And Yves Engler points out that trade agreements have ultimately served little purpose but to entrench corporate power. – Chris Doucouliagos reminds us that inequality ...

Canadian Dimension: Three years on, Mount Polley disaster a painful reminder of never-ending horror

Photo by Jonathan Hayward/CP Bev Sellers is constantly reminded about the deeply personal, social and cultural loss that she and others in her community of Williams Lake have suffered since the Mount Polley mine disaster in 2014. A few weeks ago, when the former Chief of the Xat’sull First Nation at Soda Creek, British Columbia ...

Canadian Dimension: 4 Proposed Tar Sands Oil Pipelines Pose a Threat to Water Resources

Photo from Public Domain A new analysis from Greenpeace USA finds that the three companies proposing to build tar sands pipelines have a legacy of pipeline spills, and that tar sands pipelines pose a threat to water resources. Map of 373 U.S. hazardous liquids pipelines spills from 2010 to present for TransCanada (green), Kinder Morgan ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Greg Jericho writes about Australia’s increasing income stratification and wealth inequality. Matt Bruenig examines what sets the Nordic countries apart from the rest of the world – including high unionization levels and substantial public ownership of industry along with their well-funded social programs. And their success with that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Charles Mathewes and Evan Sandsmark write that it’s long past time to start treating the excessive accumulation of wealth as something to be questioned – rather than accepted as an inevitability, or worse yet admired: The idea that wealth is morally perilous has an impressive philosophical and ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on why we should be skeptical of Donald Trump’s NAFTA demands – and why it should be willing to walk away from the table if it’s not possible to push for dramatic improvements to what’s being offered. For further reading:– The U.S.’ list of negotiating objectives is here (PDF). Canada’s is apparently nonexistent.– Again, ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Paradigm Shift in Climate Change Policy

In the news, Caroline Lucas, in The Guardian says one good policy isn’t enough; we need a paradigm shift: “Rather than simply looking for one headline-grabbing policy, the government should be embarking on a paradigm shift when it comes to how we get about in this country. …Ultimately we need a green transport revolution, not ...

Canadian Dimension: By 2100, Refugees Would Be the Most Populous Country on Earth

Photo by Anthony Gale The UN Refugee Agency has announced the new figures for the world’s displaced: 65.9 million. That means that 65.9 million human beings live as refugees, asylum seekers or as internally displaced people. If the refugees formed a country, it would be the 21st largest state in the world, just after Thailand ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Alex Ballingall reports on Niki Ashton’s environmental platform which identifies corporate greed as a major obstacle to environmental justice, and proposes a new Crown corporation to ensure public investment in response. Manishna Krishnan examines Jagmeet Singh’s plan to end racial profiling, while Doug King comments on ...

Things Are Good: Tonawanda Provides a Template for Transitioning a Town’s Economy from Coal

Globally, coal is on the way out and in America small towns are suffering because coal demand is dropping. The predictable plight of coal-backed small towns in the USA has some politicians trying to bailout the coal industry in order to protect jobs, which is obviously the wrong approach. Instead, what those backwards-looking politicians should ...

Things Are Good: Make More Things Out of Recycled Plastics

Over at Vice, one author asked a simple question: why don’t we make everything out of relayed plastic? The short answer is that oil is too cheap and companies don’t see benefits of recylcing plastics on their bottom line. Instead of championing for higher consumption taxes or waiting for oil to go up again some ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Larry Elliott reports on a Resolution Foundation study showing that while the UK’s 1% has fully recovered from the 2008 financial crash, the rest of the population hasn’t been so lucky and has faced extended stagnation at best: Families on low and middle incomes had seen their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Economist observes that the effects of climate change fall disproportionately on poorer people, rather than the wealthier ones who have caused more of the damage: The costs of global climate change will again be unevenly (and uncertainly) distributed, but harm will often be smaller for richer, temperate ...

Things Are Good: Build Butterflyways for Beautiful Pollinators

Every pollinator is beautiful and there is an easy way to see more of them while helping the world: butterflyways. The concept is simple: bees and butterflies are under a lot of pressure from human activity so help them on their pollination journey by feeding them. All you have to do is look up what ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Sooner Than You Think

Yesterday’s NYTimes has a lengthy article, “The Uninhabitable Earth,” subtitled, “What Climate Change Could Wreak – Sooner Than You Think.” In a nutshell: “…the swelling seas — and the cities they will drown — have so dominated the picture of global warming … that they have occluded our perception of other threats, many much closer ...

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Bicycling never gets old

Bicycling is part of the solution to today’s environmental and fuel crises, and the benefits of increased cycling go beyond reducing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, David Suzuki argues. The post David Suzuki: Bicycling never gets old appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

A Puff of Absurdity: On the Year that Kicked My Ass, and That Time My Ass Kicked Back

Well, it’s starting to kick back, ever so slowly. I went on another Wild Women adventure, this time to Georgian Bay to try my hand at kayaking for a change. I was with a whole new group of women, our ages spanning three decades and from a wide variety of professions and backgrounds (and photographic ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Danny Dorling writes about the connection between high inequality and disregard for the environment: In a 2016 report, Oxfam found that the greatest polluters of all were the most affluent 10% of US households: each emitted, on average, 50 tonnes of CO2 per household member per year. Canada’s ...

Susan on the Soapbox: Trudeau forgets Alberta; Alberta flips out

Canada is a special place; but Alberta is a little prickly. The Soapbox family celebrated Canada Day at Olympic Plaza trying to dislodge a Big Red Ball wedged between some girders, admiring children’s art work (our favourite was a mask made by a second grader who said it represented her love of dogs and money), ...