Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Oleg Komlik takes note of Wade Cole’s research showing how income inequality affects political dynamics. And Hannah Finnie recognizes that young people are joining unions (among other forms of social activism) in order to gain some much-needed influence on both fronts, while Paul Krugman weighs in on the ...

Things Are Good: Bird Brains Avoid Wind Farms

Opponents of clean energy try to find any reason to stop renewable installations (I guess they hate the planet?) and when it comes to wind farms they suddenly start caring about birds. Their argument is that birds will fly into the blades of wind turbines. This argument was recently studied on the shores of the ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Happy Earth Day

It’s the 48th Earth Day, and it’s the 20th anniversary of Mann’s hockey stick graph made famous in Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth. So we’ve known, for sure, that climate change is a human-made issue for a couple decades now, but Trudeau will still do what it takes to get pipelines built. It’s a beautiful ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Quirks & Quarks examines the potentially devastating effects of a dilbit spill on British Columbia’s coast. And David Climenhaga warns that Kinder Morgan is looking at NAFTA to provide it an alternate source of risk-free profits at public expense. – Mia Rabson reports on Canada’s continued failure to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – PressProgress crunches the numbers on tax loopholes and finds that more and more revenue is being lost to the most glaring loopholes every year. And Andrew Jackson hopes for a sorely-needed response from the federal government to rein in tax avoidance by the wealthy. – Sam Cooper reports ...

Things Are Good: Breakdown Plastic Using Digestive Enzymes

Recycling polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastics is difficult as the hard material is tough to breakdown. For years there’s been research into using bacteria to eat the plastic to help with getting the plastic to reusable state. This year a bacterial enzyme called “PETase” has been found to be highly effective at breaking down this hardened ...

Song of the Watermelon: National Post Letter

In today’s National Post, I’ve got another letter to the editor on everyone’s favourite topic: the Trans Mountain pipeline. (I’ll stop repeating myself once people start listening!) My letter appears only in the print edition, so I cannot provide a link. Accordingly, here is the full text: The pipeline crisis Re: PM takes right tack ...

Things Are Good: Shipping Industry Finally Delivers on Climate Change

When climate conferences occur and parties sign on to legal agreements like the Paris Agreement some industries are excluded. Historically aviation and shipping have been left out from many climate change agreements which has resulted in both industries being behind the times, inefficient, and down right bad for the planet. Already, climate change is harming ...

Canadian Dimension: Climate Change and the Struggle Against the Kinder Morgan Pipeline

Photo by Lu Iz Thousands have been pouring onto Vancouver streets, as well as protesting across Canada, against the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been attempting to square the impossible – expanding oil sands production and building pipelines while addressing climate change. The governments of BC and Canada have ignored theses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Nick Falvo offers a useful summary of the federal-provincial framework on housing – including its lack of any specific mention of homelessness and supportive housing among other deficiencies. – Meanwhile, Justin McElroy reports on the Horgan government’s plan to ensure more rights for tenants, including by applying significant ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ashley Renders reports on the Canadian mining companies which are using corporate trade deals to threaten developing countries with billion-dollar claims to stifle environmental protections. And Mike Blanchfield and Andy Blatchford report that China wants any trade deals to similarly privilege investors alone while making no allowances ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Matthew Yglesias examines the direct effects of social programs, and finds there’s every reason to invest more in them: Mercury emissions (mostly from coal plants) end up in the water, where they end up in fish, from whence they end up in the bloodstreams of children and ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Up Is Down In Moe Town

Will @CBCSask and @leaderpost and @620ckrm let the Premier continue to lie without being challenged?Does @ryanmeili or someone else have to say something first? Is there no permission to correct the Premier's lies?#skpoli #carbontax — Saskboy (@saskboy) April 3, 2018 Saskatchewan's emissions are going up, not down https://t.co/nlZxCrOsv3 pic.twitter.com/KspZuhpexX — Regina Leader-Post (@leaderpost) April 4, ...

Canadian Dimension: Paris Climate Goals Depend on Promoting Biodiversity

UN Campus, Bonn • Photo by HKuhse-Bonn A sweeping new report released on March 23rd emphasizes just how intertwined the challenges of climate change and loss of biodiversity truly are. The Paris Climate Agreement and several other United Nations (UN) pacts “all depend on the health and vitality of our natural environment in all its ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Amy Remeikis reports on new research showing how educational inequality translates into an even wider economic gap. – Hannah Johnston and Chris Land-Kazlauskas examine (PDF) the gig economy and the need for workers to be able to organize around it. But Rebecca Moss discusses another of Donald ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lee Drutman points out that Donald Trump’s presidency represents an entirely foreseeable result of a two-party, first-past-the-post electoral system: (C)ontrary to claims that American political parties have to appeal broadly to win, they only need to win a quarter of the voting-age population to gain unified control of ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Husky Might Be Fined

Husky has only been charged now by the Crown, for a spill nearly 2 years ago. Federal charges may be pending too. The provincial charges carry a possible fine of only $1M. Great deal for an oil company, to operate and ruin the water supply of Saskatchewan’s 3 largest city and many other people too. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Vanessa Brcic offers some observations on the connection between poverty and health, including the importance of ensuring marginalized people are treated with respect: The economic argument for poverty reduction is clear, but we see in health care what is more plainly obvious and compelling: the argument for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Faiza Shaheen discusses the UK Cons’ attempts to paper over the harmful effects of austerity. And Amir Fleischmann points out that while the human cost of cuts to public services is all too real, the supposed fiscal benefits are usually illusory: Many social programs that fiscal conservatives advocate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Amir Sufi and Atif Mian discuss how household debt tends to drive both the booms and busts of the business cycle. Which means there’s plenty of reason for concern about a Canadian economy reliant on household debt to paper over income insecurity and inequality – and Michal Rozworski ...

Things Are Good: China’s Efforts to Fight Pollution are Working

Back in 2014 China decided it was sick of producing so much pollution and decided to do something about it. China started to close coal plants, spent $120 billion cleaning air in cities and launched similar initiatives throughout the country. The results have been longer life spans for people in impacted areas and a more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – May Boeve and Michael Brune comment on the danger that political- and court-based attacks on U.S. unions could substantially weaken the progressive movement as a whole. But Jane McAlevey writes that West Virginia’s successful teachers’ strike may provide an important reminder that the power of collective action can ...

Things Are Good: Teens are Fighting for our Collective Climate Future

Teens today are doing something their parents didn’t do: act on the knowledge that climate change is happening. Boomers did a great job of gobbling many of the worlds resources and dumping carbon into the atmosphere, subsequent generations dealt with proving that to be true. Now the current generation of teens is sick of dealing ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Don’t Make It Sound Like There’s More Than One Thing

“recognize its own climate change efforts, such as carbon capture and storage. ” Effort, not “efforts”. There’s only been one effort made, and arguably the CCS project increases emissions since it’s an Enhanced Oil Recovery project that enables Cenovus to extract more oil which will be burned. Whether the net CO2 from CCS is a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – J.W. Mason reviews Yanis Varoufakis’ Adults in the Room with a focus on how damaging austerity was forced on Greece by other governments. And Jan Rovny comments on the need for Europe’s left-wing parties to adapt to the precarious economy and evolving social structures. – Laurie Monsebraaten reports ...