Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David MacDonald discusses the need to start tackling some of Canada’s most expensive and least justifiable tax handouts to the rich: The richest 10 per cent of Canadians enjoy an average of $20,500 a year in tax exemptions, credits, and other loopholes. That’s $6,000 more than in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Kevin Young, Tarun Banerjee and Michael Schwartz discuss how capital uses the exact tools it’s working to take away from labour – including the threat of strikes – to impose an anti-social agenda on the public: Capitalists routinely exert leverage over governments by withholding the resources — ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Sarah-Taïssir Bencharif discusses her experience facing prejudice against Muslims in Canada. But Ashifa Kassam reports on the growing public response to violence, as communities across the country formed “rings of peace” around mosques during their prayers on Friday. – Meanwhile, Maher Arar points out how Canada’s security state ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how a change in government hasn’t done anything to slow the spread of Canada’s surveillance state – both in terms of intrusive new legislative proposals, and a continued determination to operate even outside the law. For further reading…– Again, Dave Seglins and Rachel Houlihan reported on the Cold War-era wiretapping approvals which are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Sean McElwee offers his take on the crucial failings which have led the U.S. Democrats to their current nadir in which principles and values have been discarded in the pursuit of power they’ve failed to secure. – Mike Konczal and Marshall Steinbaum highlight the importance of effective government ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jacob Levy highlights the importance of “identity politics” – or more specifically, the willingness to fight against systematic inequality of all kinds – as part of an effective progressive movement. And George Monbiot writes that we should be returning to first principles when it comes to the economy, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Karl Nerenberg examines new research from the Canadian Centre for the Study of Living Standards showing how workers have seen hardly any benefit from four decades of productivity gains which have filled corporate coffers: (I)n Canada, the productivity of labour — the amount workers produce per unit of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Brent Patterson criticizes the Libs’ short-sighted plans to privatize public services in lieu of any coherent economic policy. And Tom Parkin calls out their bait-and-switch approach to infrastructure. – Robin McKie reports on Nicholas Stern’s recognition that his much-cited work on the impacts of climate change only underestimated ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Branko Milanovic highlights the futility of pretending that market mechanisms will produce anything other than profit-oriented outcomes – and the observation represents an obvious reason not to put public services in corporate hands. And David Sloan Wilson (in introducing an interview with Sigrun Aasland) points out how Norway’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Bruce Johnstone notes that rather than further attacking public services which have already been under siege throughout his stay in office, Brad Wall and his government should be looking to question Saskatchewan’s inexplicable giveaways to businesses: Well, if Doherty is looking for some “low-hanging fruit” to make our ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Summers discusses the economic damage being done by a top-heavy income spectrum – as the effect of major stimulus programs may have been wholly outweighed by the decline in middle-class incomes. – Meanwhile, Canadians for Tax Fairness points out the impending tax court case which will bring ...

The Canadian Progressive: NDP MP Randall Garrison introduces bill to repeal Bill C-51

Randall Garrison’s Bill C-303 seeks to repeal the Harper-era “secret police” legislation, Bill C-51 or Anti-terrorism Act, 2015. Experts and rights groups say C-51 violates the Canadians Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The post NDP MP Randall Garrison introduces bill to repeal Bill C-51 appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean

Three years after Edward Snowden’s eye-opening state surveillance revelations, it’s time for the Communications Security Establishment and Canada’s other spy agencies to come clean. The post Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Katie Hyslop contrasts Canada’s longstanding recognition that housing is a human right against the gross lack of policy action to ensure its availability: Canada has signed and ratified the 1976 United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and in Article 11 it does recognize ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ian Welsh discusses the attitude of meanness underlying so much of the U.S.’ political and cultural scene. – Ryan Meili and Adrienne Silnicki write about the dangers of relying on paid plasma donations. And Alexa Huffman and Whitney Stinson report that the Sask Party’s obsession with cutting public ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Elaine Power discusses how a basic income can build both individual security and social solidarity: We work for lots of different reasons, not just money. And most of us do work that is never paid. To start, we need to change our ideas about work, not just ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Richard Eskow summarizes the basic facts about inequality in the U.S. Ta-Nehisi Coates argues that it’s impossible to fully explain or address that problem without factoring in ongoing racial disparities. And Sean Trembath writes about James Daschuk’s work in tracing health disparities among indigenous peoples back to Canada’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Casselman and Andrew Flowers discuss Raj Chetty’s research on the U.S.’ glaring lack of social mobility and fair opportunities: Children from poor families are much less likely to work in adulthood than children from middle-class families. Only about 60 percent of children from the poorest families are ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Conservatives Failed to Protect Privacy

The Liberals record? Not much better. “I can’t answer the question about the former government, what their reasons were,” said Sajjan, also noting he does not believe any of the metadata inadvertently shared could have ended up in the hands of any countries beyond the Five Eyes. BREAKING: #CSE suspends #metadata sharing with int'l partners ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Duncan Brown discusses the connection between precarious work and low productivity. And Sara Mojtehedzadeh examines how Ontario’s workers’ compensation system is pushing injured individuals into grinding poverty by setting impossible requirements for claimants. – Jim Balsillie worries that the Trans-Pacific Partnership will only increase the tendency of profits ...

The Canadian Progressive: Justin Trudeau to give Canada’s NSA more powers to spy on Canadians

Justin Trudeau promises to give the Communications Security Establishment, Canada’s most secretive spy agency, more powers to spy on Canadians if the Liberals form the next government after the 2015 federal election. The post Justin Trudeau to give Canada’s NSA more powers to spy on Canadians appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Margaret Atwood leads artists’ rebellion against Harper’s Bill C-51

Celebrated author Margaret Atwood is leading a group of 200 notable Canadian writers and artists demanding an immediate repeal of Bill C-51, Stephen Harper’s “secret police” legislation. C­51, the artists argue, “directly attacks the creative arts and free expression in this country.” The post Margaret Atwood leads artists’ rebellion against Harper’s Bill C-51 appeared first ...

The Canadian Progressive: RCMP planning mass arrests of indigenous Unist’ot’en activists under Bill C-51: Reports

Canadian rights defenders are warning that the RCMP is planning mass arrests of members of the indigenous Unist’ot’en First Nation using the country’s new police state law, Bill C-51. The post RCMP planning mass arrests of indigenous Unist’ot’en activists under Bill C-51: Reports appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.