Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kenneth Rogoff writes about the dangers of presuming that economic growth (at least in stock markets if not wages) can withstand political upheaval. Marco Chown Oved reports on the strong support for Democracy Watch’s petition to raise corporate taxes and close loopholes. Rajeshni Naidu-Ghelani reports on the latest ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Joan Hennessy writes that instead of limiting ourselves to holiday-season charity, we should insist on fair wages and dignity for our fellow citizens throughout the year: ll the while, the economy has been on the mend and corporate earnings have risen, but the federal minimum wage remains $7.25 ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – The Star’s editorial board calls for a reworking of Canada’s tax system to make sure businesses pay their fair share: The tax bills of most big companies have declined significantly both as a proportion of their profits and as a proportion of Ottawa’s total tax revenue. This means ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Maia Szalavitz writes that the atmosphere of competition and status signalling which prevails in unequal societies is directly connected to increased homicide rates: While on the surface, the disputes that triggered these deaths seem trivial – each involved apparently small disagreements and a sense of being seen as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Abacus Data has polled the Canadian public on climate change, and found far more appetite for meaningful action than we generally hear from the political class (and particularly right-wing parties): Twenty years ago, when the world’s leaders were debating the Kyoto Accord, a case could be made ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – The Star’s editorial board argues that the Paradise Papers prove the need for a crackdown on offshore tax avoidance. Zach Dubinsky and Harvey Cashore report on one nine-figure scheme cooked up by BMO. And Oxfam offers its list of suggestions to end the UK’s tax scandals. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Wanda Wyporska writes that increasing inequality is the main factor behind public distrust and discontent with our politics: Rising inequality is not inevitable, it is largely a result of the political and economic decisions taken by governments. This is clear from the varying levels of inequality in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Brad Delong writes that political choices – not a lack of resources – are responsible for the limited progress being made toward the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. – Matt Bruenig weighs in on the U.S.’ unprecedented levels of wealth inequality. And Bill Moyers comments on the vulture ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Stefan Stern writes that our current corporate culture needs to be changed in ways going far beyond reining in excessive executive compensation: Wage inequality is also a symbol of something more fundamentally wrong in the business world. Too many corporations are competing to achieve the wrong results in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Melanie Schmitz writes that Donald Trump’s plan to hand giant tax goodies to the rich is opposed by nearly three quarters of Americans. – CNBC reports on the skepticism among U.S. workers as to their future opportunities. And Jim Stanford offers a historical perspective on what’s most recently ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Alex Ballingall reports on Guy Caron’s infrastructure and jobs plan which features both a large investment in public works, and substantial improvements in both wages and working conditions under federal jurisdiction. – Thomas Walkom criticizes Singh’s plan to roll Old Age Security into a means-tested benefit. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Nick Saul reminds us of the need for strong and consistent public pressure to end poverty. And the Economist points out how punitive criminal justice policies coupled with a lack of rehabilitation strand people in poverty rather than allowing for a path toward contributing to society. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ben Kentish reports on the Equality Trust’s research showing that the poorest 10% of the population in the UK actually pays a higher percentage of its income in taxes than the top 10%. Dominic Rushe, Ben Jacobs and Sabrina Siddiqui discuss how Donald Trump is going out ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Andre Picard talks to the Current about the need to start demanding more from our universal health care system, rather than being persuaded to put up with less. And Canadian Doctors for Medicare offers its support to the Ontario NDP’s pharmacare plan, while Chris Selley writes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Anis Chowdhury refutes the theory that top-heavy tax cuts have anything to do with economic development: Cross-country research has found no relationship between changes in top marginal tax rates and growth between 1960 and 2010. For example, during this period, the US cut its top rate by ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how Brad Wall is preaching neglect and delay as a response to violent racism (even as he’s fully prepared to use as much political capital as he can muster pitching the idea of a SaskTel selloff). For further reading…– Wall’s comments which try to minimize Saskatchewan’s racism are here. And Donna ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall is preaching neglect and delay as a response to violent racism (even as he’s fully prepared to use as much political capital as he can muster pitching the idea of a SaskTel selloff). For further reading…– Wall’s comments which try to minimize Saskatchewan’s racism are here. And Donna Harpauer’s statement ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Martin Jacques writes about the inescapable failings of neoliberalism, along with the question of what alternative will come next: (B)y historical standards, the neoliberal era has not had a particularly good track record. The most dynamic period of postwar western growth was that between the end of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Branko Milanovic points out how the commodification of our interactions may create an incentive for short-term exploitation: Commodification of what was hitherto a non-commercial resource makes each of us do many jobs and even, as in the renting of apartments, capitalists. But saying that I work many jobs ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Aditya Chakrabortty sums up George Osborne’s legacy – and give or take a Brexit vote, it looks awfully familiar for corporatist governments in general: The multi-million-pound spending spree wasn’t justifiable, admitted Osborne, according to Laws’ recent memoir, Coalition. “It will only really be of help to stupid, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mary O’Hara reviews Daniel Hatcher’s new book on the U.S.’ poverty industry which seeks to exploit public supports for private gain: (A) new book published last week by law professor and advocate Daniel L Hatcher, The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America’s Most Vulnerable Citizens, exposes a largely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lisa Phillips writes about the desperate need for Canadian courts to ensure a fair tax system, rather than allowing technicalities and loopholes to win out over the principle that everybody should pay a fair share: With some exceptions, Canadian judges have defaulted to a literal reading of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jim Tankersley interviews Joshua Bivens about the relative effects of economic growth and income inequality – and particularly his evidence showing that more people are far better off with more modest growth fairly distributed than with greater nominal growth concentrated at the top: Tankersley: How do we know ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Alison Crawford reports on the Libs’ failure to pass any new legislation to allow collective bargaining for RCMP members – leaving them with even less than the system which was already found to be unconstitutional. And Jake Johnson discusses the consequences of the U.S. corporate sector’s war ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Aditya Chakrabortty comments on how massive amounts of wealth are both being siphoned out of our social systems, and used to buy the politicians who facilitate those transfers: (A)t root, the Panama Papers are not about tax. They’re not even about money. What the Panama Papers really depict ...