Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Anthony Fernandez-Castaneda et al. examine the long-term neurological and cognitive damage caused even by “mild” cases of COVID. Sally Cutler discusses the implications of the Omicron COVID variant remaining transmissible longer than previously assumed even as governments and employers are adamant about forcing

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Alberta Politics: There are several reasons for Jason Kenney’s enthusiasm for ‘small modular reactors’ – none of them are particularly good

Small nuclear reactors don’t make any more economic sense now than they did back in the summer of 2020 when Alberta Premier Jason Kenney took to the Internet to tout the supposed benefits of the largely undeveloped technology being promoted by Canada’s nuclear industry.  Now that Mr. Kenney has taken

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Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – CBC News reports that Saskatchewan’s children’s hospital is among the health care facilities with an internal outbreak, while Laura Sciarpelletti talks to some of the parents begging the provincial government to limit transmission in schools. – Moira Wyton reports on British Columbia’s

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Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – CTV reports on Alberta Health Services’ recognition that tens of thousands of the province’s residents project to suffer from long COVID. Alex McKeen reports on Ontario’s missing health care workers as the Omicron variant runs rampant, while Enzo Dimatteo examines the potentially catastrophic

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Northern Currents –: Conservative Premier Scott Moe sides with Big Oil campaign, ignores the climate crisis

Regina city councillors proposed legislation to ban advertisements from oil and gas industry. The industry responded with an astroturfing campaign. Here we have yet another example of right-wing politicians supporting powerful oil and gas corporations. These corporations are so powerful that they can shape narratives and create false populist movements. 

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