The Canadian Progressive: Canada Revenue Agency suspends controversial Harper-era audit of charities

The Canada Revenue Agency has suspended the controversial Harper-era auditing of Canadian charities’ political activities. But some targeted organizations such as the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, a respected left-leaning think-tank, still await closure on their audit. The post Canada Revenue Agency suspends controversial Harper-era audit of charities appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Celebrity charities just compete with all other charities – so why start one?

Since there is already an “enormous number of charities in the world,” most of which compete with other charities for our hard-earned donations, does it make any sense for celebrities to create their own charities? The post Celebrity charities just compete with all other charities – so why start one? appeared first on The Canadian ...

The Canadian Progressive: Trump unhappy because son must give up charity work due to possible conflict of interest

As part of an effort to disappear potential conflicts of interest, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump recently announced he’d dissolve the Donald J Trump Foundation. Meanwhile, the 45th President of the United States says its unfair that his son Eric must now give up charity work. The post Trump unhappy because son must give up charity ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Eshe Nelson interviews Richard Baldwin about the future of globalization and the possibility that the worst disruptions to workers are just beginning: What happens to the chart on global income distribution during this phase of globalization? It keeps going down. It will be disruptive in the G7, but ...

The Canadian Progressive: CRA seeks Canadians’ feedback on its controversial auditing of charities’ political activities

The Canada Revenue Agency wants to hear from Canadians regarding its controversial auditing of charities’ political activities. The public’s feedback will lead to “the development of new guidance or educational resources for charities on the rules governing political activities.” The post CRA seeks Canadians’ feedback on its controversial auditing of charities’ political activities appeared first ...

Environmental Law Alert Blog: A new law is needed to protect citizens’ voices through the charities they support

Wednesday, November 16, 2016 Canadian law and policy restricts the involvement of charities in public debate and public policy development – activities labeled by the Canada Revenue Agency as “political activities”. Limiting charities’ involvement in public debate and public policy development silences the voices of Canadians who rely on the charities they support to advance ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Alan Freeman is duly appalled by Apple’s attempt to throw itself a pity party with the money it’s hoarding rather than paying in fair corporate taxes. And James Mackintosh reports on Jeroen Dijsselbloem’s response to Apple’s utterly tone-deaf position that it’s entitled to its entitlements, while the Globe ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading: – Ross Douthat (!) discusses the distinction between actual cosmopolitanism, and the global elitism that’s instead come to dominate international power relations: Genuine cosmopolitanism is a rare thing. It requires comfort with real difference, with forms of life that are truly exotic relative to one’s own. It takes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jared Bernstein is hopeful that the era of expansive corporate rights agreements is coming to an end. Paul Krugman notes that there’s no evidence anybody has gained economically from the spread of those agreements other than the wealthy few pushing them through. And Stuart Trew has some suggestions ...

The Canadian Progressive: CRA revokes registration of charity that acted as a “receipting agent” for tax shelter arrangement

In December, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) revoked the registration of a Canadian charity that acted as a “receipting agent” for a tax shelter arrangement. Le Refuge des Rescapés, a charity based in Saint-Nicéphore, Quebec, “improperly issued receipts totalling over $2 million.” The post CRA revokes registration of charity that acted as a “receipting agent” ...

The Canadian Progressive: Trudeau: CRA must allow charities to do their work “free from political harassment”

In his recent Ministerial Mandate Letter to Diane Lebouthillier, the Minister of National Revenue, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) must allow charities to do their work free from political harassment. The post Trudeau: CRA must allow charities to do their work “free from political harassment” appeared first on The Canadian ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson offers his prescription for Canada’s economy in the face of plunging oil prices and a sinking dollar. And Murray Dobbin argues that the Libs’ handling of trade agreements reflects a fundamental economic choice between a socially-oriented economic outlook which has worked in the past, and a ...

In-Sights: Corus – CKNW Orphans’ Fund revisited

The Voluntarism Fantasy, Mike Konczal, Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, 2014Conservatives dream of returning to a world where private charity fulfilled all public needs. But that world never existed — and we’re better for it. …Before government took on the role of providing social insurance, individuals and private charity did everything needed to insure people ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Joseph Stiglitz laments the corporate takeover of policy-making processes, including by imposing trade rules which impede democratic decision-making: The real intent of [investor protection] provisions is to impede health, environmental, safety, and, yes, even financial regulations meant to protect America’s own economy and citizens. Companies can sue ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Trish Hennessy writes that the Cons’ budget is based purely on wishful thinking and deliberate denial rather than any rational plan. PressProgress identifies just a few of the problems which can’t be put off for two generations, no matter how determined Joe Oliver is to push any ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Garfield Mahood and Brian Iler discuss the challenge facing charities as compared to the special treatment of businesses in trying to advocate as to public policy: (T)he solutions to many of society’s problems do not need more research and the criticism-free public education that the CRA permits. They ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – John Hood discusses how the privilege of the political class makes it difficult for elected representatives to understand, let alone address, the problems of the precariat. And Lawrence Mishel and Will Kimball document the continued connection between the erosion of unions and income inequality. – Lizzie Dearden reports ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Will Hutton writes about the connection between inequality and the loss of any moral or social purpose in public life: Britain is beset by a crisis of purpose. We don’t know who we are any longer, where we are going or even if there is a “we”. ...

The Canadian Progressive: CRA Guts Dying With Dignity’s Long-Standing Charitable Status

Leading death with dignity lobby group announced Tuesday that it’s losing its charitable status after a recent political-activity audit by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The post CRA Guts Dying With Dignity’s Long-Standing Charitable Status appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Lynn Parramore interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the spread of inequality, along with the need for a strengthened labour movement to reverse the trend: LP: In your paper, you indicate that the power of the 1 percent to exploit the rest seems to be increasing. Why is this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – A Gandalf Group poll finds (PDF) that Canadians have come to perceive and expect a disturbing level of self-serving action by our political leaders. And while Dale Smith is right to note that we’ve largely limited the most obvious forms of corruption, there’s still plenty of reason ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Stephanie Levitz reports on the Broadbent Institute’s study showing that Con-friendly charities haven’t been facing any of the strict scrutiny being used to silence anybody who dares to speak up for environmental or social causes. And Jeremy Nuttall notes that the problem is probably worse than it seems ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Paul Kershaw examines political parties’ child care plans past and present, and finds the NDP’s new proposal to achieve better results at a lower cost. The Star’s editorial board weighs in on the desperate need for an improved child care system, while PressProgress focuses on the economic benefits. ...

Northern Insight / Perceptivity: Profits first, charities second

Not what it seems. I’ve kept an eye on finances of the CKNW Orphans’ Fund. My attention began after the Corus radio station dropped its long time policy – under Griffiths family ownership – of paying overhead costs of the charity. They were entitled to make the change; they weren’t entitled to remain silent about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jack Peat argues for trickle-up economics to ensure that everybody shares in our common resources (while also encouraging economic development): Good capitalism is the ability to promote incentives and opportunity in equal measure. Sway too far one way and the potential of human capital is stifled, sway ...