Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Rick Smith writes about the Filthy Five loopholes taking the most money out of Canada’s public coffers for the least benefit to anybody but the wealthy. And Ed Finn reminds us to follow the money in figuring out who stands to gain from unconscionable policy choices. – Douglas ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman reminds us of the fraud that is right-wing bleating about deficits: There have been many “news analysis” pieces asking why Republicans have changed their views on deficit spending. But let’s be serious: Their views haven’t changed at all. They never really cared about debt and deficits; ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Michelle Chen takes note of the influx of young energy into the U.S.’ labour movement: (I)n contrast to the myth of millennials’ being economically and politically adrift, they’re stepping in readily to fill the union ranks that have hemorrhaged middle-aged workers over the years—2017 actually saw an ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joe Romm discusses new research showing that man-made greenhouse gas emissions have ended an 11,000-year era of climate stability. – Thomas Walkom points out the contradictions in Justin Trudeau’s declaration that there will be no federal climate policy without new pipelines. And David Climenhaga writes about the complete ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Victor Cyr discusses the problems with a public policy focus on capitalism without any concern for human well-being. And Ann Pettifor highlights the concentrated wealth and power arising out of corporate monopolies, while noting that political decisions are behind those realities. – Alan Freeman points out that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Matt Bruenig writes about the U.S.’ alarming growth in student debt – which combined with diminished career prospects is leading to dim future outlooks for far too many young workers. And Eric Grenier’s look at the latest release of data from Canada’s 2016 census shows a stark ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Michal Rozworski writes that the bidding war surrounding Amazon’s second headquarters is just a symptom of a grossly dysfunctional relationship between governments and businesses: We shouldn’t be surprised that Amazon can get away with using a few billion dollars of private investment as bait for public billions in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Mark Karlin interviews George Monbiot about the prospect of politics based on empathy, sharing and belonging. – Andrew Jackson and Kate McInturff each offer their take on the federal fiscal update – with both lamenting the Libs’ lack of ambition. – Karl Nerenberg highlights how the federal ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Karri Munn-Venn argues for a federal budget focused on social well-being – not merely on economic productivity. And Tom Hale discusses the harm done by social isolation. – The BBC reports on new research showing that the UK’s public support for parents is falling behind the rate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Gary Younge examines how Jeremy Corbyn and an unabashedly progressive campaign platform are making massive gains in a UK general election cynically called to exploit Labour’s perceived weakness: Seeing the response to Labour’s election manifesto last week was a clear illustration of just how powerful the amnesiac qualities ...

Defend Public Healthcare: Hospital funding increase less than last year’s

In  the lead up to the Budget, the government crowed  that they had heard the public and would improve funding for hospitals. However, based on government  announcements, they actually plan to lower the hospital funding increase this year.  They state they will increase hospital funding $518 million, a 3% increase.  But, on closer inspection, the ...

Defend Public Healthcare: More spending on new hospitals and new beds? Nope

Hospital funding:  There is something off about the provincial government’s Budget claims on hospital capital funding (funding to build and renovate hospital beds and facilities).   For what it is worth (which is not that much, given the long time frame the government cites), the province claims it will increase hospital capital spending over the next ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Martin Patriquin takes Saskatchewan’s increasing recognition of the Wall government’s institutional corruption to the national stage: Politicians who navigate a corrupted political system have some of the easiest jobs in the world. With the weight and legitimacy of the state behind them, they need not sell anything ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jordan Brennan and Kaylie Tiessen write that it’s long past time to set a level of federal revenue sufficient to support the social programs Canadians want: In the decades since [corporate-driven] reforms were undertaken, Canada experienced a significant deterioration in its macroeconomic performance: business investment has worsened and ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on this post about New Brunswick’s failed attempt to become a corporate tax haven – and why Brad Wall’s attempt at a similar scheme for Saskatchewan is similarly doomed. For further reading…– Again, the outline of Shawn Graham’s scheme to win over corporations as a tax haven is found in Daniel McHardle’s report. ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall’s costly and counterproductive decision to trash the Saskatchewan Transportation Company mirrors his government’s worst traits. For further reading…– Jason Warick reported here on the plan to shut down STC – as well as the absurd day-long shutdown of the service for nothing more than communications purposes. And the government’s excuses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Charles Smith and Andrew Stevens examine how Brad Wall’s slash-and-burn budget is intended to exploit a crisis for political ends – while also highlighting the type of response needed to reverse the damage: In our view, Budget 2017 should be viewed in two ways. First, it is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jordon Cooper writes that the Saskatchewan Party’s slash-and-burn budget confirms that for them, the poor don’t matter. CBC reports on the devastating effect the budget will have on municipalities, while Courtney Markewitch reports that Saskatoon’s city council is fighting back. And Joel Senick notes that the planned shutdown ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

A few notes worth a look in advance of today’s youth-focused debate… – Kyle Duggan reports on Pat Stogran’s imminent entry into the race. And The View Up Here features an extended interview to introduce Stogran as a candidate, while CTV offers a shorter interview. – Anishinabek News examines Charlie Angus’ focus on First Nations ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Brian Jones rightly argues that a fair tax system would go a long way toward eliminating any serious concerns about government deficits. And Marco Chown Oved offers some reason for optimism in the Canada Revenue Agency’s response to the Panama Papers. – David Macdonald examines what could have ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In the wake of a thoroughly disappointing budget day at both the provincial and federal levels, it’s worth taking note of Ivan Sigal’s view on the importance of building trust – rather than limiting citizens to either fake news or fake policies: How do we begin to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Katie Allen reports on the growing gap between the privileged few and the working class in the UK. And Frank Elgar highlights how we all pay the price of inequality, even as our governments can’t be bothered to rein it in: For decades, the IMF, OECD, and World ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, pointing out that Brad Wall’s deficit can be traced primarily (if not entirely) to his unproductive tax slashing – and that even an austerity-laden budget is being designed to make matters worse. For further reading…– Jason Warick’s series of reports on obvious ways to improve Saskatchewan’s fiscal situation can again be found here, here, ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s determination to make work more precarious – and pay and benefits harder to come by – in the public and private sectors alike. For further reading…– The history of the Skip the Dishes saga includes the government’s plan for millions of dollars in handouts; the decision of the company not ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...