Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses UK Labour’s true social democratic platform as a model for progressive parties around the globe. And Simon Wren-Lewis points out that contrary to the spin of opponents and uninformed presumptions of much of the media, Labour’s plan is entirely affordable. – Meanwhile, as part ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic reviews Mike Lofgren’s The Deep State, and highlights how entrenched wealth and power have hijacked our public institutions for their own benefit: The deep state includes the old-fashioned military-industrial complex, top of Wall Street and Silicon valley, think tanks and foundations, and the mainstream media, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Dan Levin writes that Christy Clark and her B.C. Libs have turned British Columbia into a haven for capital to run wild without any social responsibility or public benefit: Like many places, British Columbia set up a system of tax incentives to lure businesses to the far western ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic offers his take on how the U.S.’ version of liberalism paved the way for Donald Trump and his ilk both by buying into corporatist assumptions about success, and by treating electoralism as the basis for political organization: In economics, liberalism espoused “neo-liberalism” which was the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Branko Milanovic highlights the futility of pretending that market mechanisms will produce anything other than profit-oriented outcomes – and the observation represents an obvious reason not to put public services in corporate hands. And David Sloan Wilson (in introducing an interview with Sigrun Aasland) points out how Norway’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – John Quiggin argues that public services and corporate control don’t mix – no matter how desperately the people seeking to exploit public money try to pretend otherwise: Market-oriented reforms, particularly in the provision of human services like health, education and public safety, have begun with a working ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Branko Milanovic examines whether the U.S.’ tax system is actually progressive all the way to the top of the income spectrum – and finds that there’s not enough data about the treatment of the extremely wealthy to be sure. And Robert Cribb and Marco Chown Oved discuss ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Wells argues that climate change and First Nations reconciliation – two of the issues which the Libs have tried to turn into signature priorities – look set to turn into areas of weakness as Justin Trudeau continues his party’s tradition of dithering. And Martin Lukacs writes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the connection between unionization and secure employment income – and the importance of encouraging the former if people otherwise face no real hope of achieving the latter. For further reading…– Again, Jake Rosenfeld, Patrick Denice and Jennifer Laird’s Economic Policy Institute study showing how unionization boosts non-union pay is here.– The Canadian Payroll ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Branko Milanovic points out how the commodification of our interactions may create an incentive for short-term exploitation: Commodification of what was hitherto a non-commercial resource makes each of us do many jobs and even, as in the renting of apartments, capitalists. But saying that I work many jobs ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Stephen Hawking discusses the crucial distinction between seeing money as a means of pursuing worthy ends versus treating it a goal in and of itself – and notes that we should be wary of political choices based on the latter view: Money is also important because it is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Branko Milanovic argues that there’s plenty of reason to be concerned about inequality even if one puts aside a utilitarian comparison of individual needs and benefits: (I)nequality of opportunity affects negatively economic growth (so we now have a negative effect going from my third ground back to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – In the wake of yesterday’s Brexit vote, David Dayen points out how the failure of technocratic policy left many voters believing they had nothing to lose in abandoning the European Union. Dawn Foster highlights the role Conservative-driven austerity played on that front. And Owen Jones comments on what ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Hamilton Nolan interviews Branko Milanovic about inequality on both a national and international scale – and how there’s little reason to take heart in reductions in the latter if it’s paired with increases in the former: Gawker: Is it fair for people to ask what good the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Miles Corak reviews Branko Milanovic’s new book on the complicated relationship between globalization and income inequality. Dougald Lamont examines the current state of inequality in Canada. And Matthew Yglesias takes a look at research showing that inequality and social friction can be traced back centuries based on the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic discusses how our current means of measuring inequality may leave out the most important part of the story in the form of wealth deliberately hidden from public view: (T)here are at least two problems. First, the rich especially, but everybody else as well, have a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alison Griswold points out how little systemic information we have about the growing gig economy. And both Scott Santens and Richard Reeves make the case for a basic income to provide financial security where an increasingly precarious labour market won’t. – Meanwhile, Branko Milanovic argues that we ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Alan Freeman notes that the Libs’ aversion to raising public revenue may lock in some of the Cons’ most damaging actions: With the new Liberal government facing fierce economic headwinds — plus a billion-dollar shortfall created by its middle-income tax cut, and a growing need for revenue ...