Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David MacDonald discusses the need to start tackling some of Canada’s most expensive and least justifiable tax handouts to the rich: The richest 10 per cent of Canadians enjoy an average of $20,500 a year in tax exemptions, credits, and other loopholes. That’s $6,000 more than in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Meagan Gilmore examines how an increased minimum wage is good for business. – Hannah Aldridge offers some suggestions to keep a poverty reduction strategy on target. And Make Poverty History notes that Brian Pallister is offering a textbook example of how not to do it by ignoring his ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Barbara Ellen questions the positive spin the right tries to put on poverty and precarity, and writes that we’re all worse off forcing people to just barely get by: In recent times, there has been a lot said about those people who are “just managing”. They are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – The Star argues that Canada can’t afford to leave tax loopholes wide open for the rich – as the Libs are doing in violation of their campaign promises. And Martin Lukacs notes that obscene giveaways to the rich seem to be the top priority for Justin Trudeau ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Mary O’Hara notes that even a relatively modest and incomplete set of progressive policies has created some important movement toward reducing poverty. And conversely, Caroline Mortimer writes that child poverty is exploding under the Conservative majority government in the UK. – Dean Beeby reports on the cause ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Labour Day reading. – Jared Bernstein comments on the prospect of a labour revival which can boost the prospects of unionized and non-unionized workers alike. And Thomas Walkom makes the case for closer identification between the NDP and Canada’s labour movement: Labour needs a political party because unions, on their own, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada: Take On Wall Street is both the name and the feisty attitude of a nationwide campaign that a coalition ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada: Take On Wall Street is both the name and the feisty attitude of a nationwide campaign that a coalition ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands. – Sean McElwee highlights still more research showing that right-wing government tends to fail even on its own terms, with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands. – Sean McElwee highlights still more research showing that right-wing government tends to fail even on its own terms, with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Rachel West charts how higher wages and improved social supports can reduce crime rates and their resulting costs. – Lana Payne comments on the glass ceiling still limiting the wages and opportunities available to women in the workplace. And Stephanie Langton highlights how a combination of student loan ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Dani Rodrik comments on the need for a far more clear set of policy prescriptions for left-wing political parties to present as an alternative to laissez-faire corporate domination, while noting there’s no lack of source material worth considering: The good news is that the intellectual vacuum on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Neil Irwin writes about the White House Council of Economic Advisers’ study of employment policy which found that superior protections for workers (rather than the undermining of employment standards in the name of “flexibility”) correlate to improved workforce participation. – MaxSpeak discusses the value of universal social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Cynthia Kaufman discusses Moses Naim’s theory that while a transnational ruling class has managed to exercise almost total control over the functions of government, it’s set to lose power over the public at large. And 63Mag interviews Jennifer Hollett about the future of progressive activism and organizing in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ryan Meili writes that the spread of for-profit corporate medicine – including through the Saskatchewan Party’s privatization of care – demonstrates the need for enforcement of the Canada Health Act. And the Star makes the case for mandatory disclosure of drug companies’ payments to doctors to promote their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Alice Martin offers three basic reasons why unions are as necessary now as ever, while PressProgress weighs in on the IMF’s findings showing the correlation between unions and greater equality. And David Ball points out that there’s a long way to go merely to reverse the damage ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Scott Santens discusses how a basic income could help to foster social cohesion. And Jared Bernstein confirms the seemingly obvious point that properly-funded social programs work wonders in reducing poverty. – Bill Curry reports that activist groups are seeking answers about what their much-hyped “social infrastructure” will ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Tony Atkinson offers reason for hope that it’s more than possible to rein in inequality and ensure a more fair distribution of resources if we’re willing to put in the work to make it happen: (T)he present levels of inequality are not inevitable; we are not simply at ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Julie Delahanty discusses the need for Canada’s federal government to rein in rising inequality. And Tim Stacey duly challenges the excuse that today’s poor people just aren’t poor enough to deserve any consideration. – Amy Goodman interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the serious problems with the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Andrea ...

Left Over: Composure Under Pressure…..

I am trying with  great difficulty to ignore the current campaign for a new Parliament and, if there is any justice, a  new PM. I have been also trying, somewhat unsuccessfully, to stop comparing and contrasting (thanks so much to all my Uni  profs. who beat that concept into my head….)  my own reality with ...

Left Over: Composure Under Pressure…..

I am trying with  great difficulty to ignore the current campaign for a new Parliament and, if there is any justice, a  new PM. I have been also trying, somewhat unsuccessfully, to stop comparing and contrasting (thanks so much to all my Uni  profs. who beat that concept into my head….)  my own reality with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Yonatan Strauch and Thomas Homer-Dixon discuss how the Cons’ economic plans involve betting against our planet. And David Macdonald notes that the supposed reward for prioritizing oil profits over a sustainable future is to stagnate at recession-level employment rates. – James Bagnall documents the rise of inequality in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford discusses how the Trans-Pacific Partnership is renegotiating NAFTA – and taking away what little Canada salvaged in that deal. And Jared Bernstein highlights the TPP’s impact on prescription drug costs. – Rick Smith rightly challenges the effort some people have made to minimize the difference ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kevin Carmichael compares the federal parties’ promises to help parents and concludes the NDP’s child care plan to hold far more social and economic benefit, while Natascia Lypny likewise finds that parents are more interested in actual affordable child-care spaces than tax baubles. CTV reports on the NDP’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Haroon Siddiqui comments on the Cons’ tall economic tales. And Steven Chase and Greg Keenan note that workers are rightly fighting back against the Cons’ plan to sell out Canada’s auto parts industry and its 80,000 jobs. – Canadian Doctors for Medicare weighs in with its approval ...