Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Global Alliance for Tax Justice examines the most common tax evasion practices used to allow the wealthy to avoid paying their fair share. And Desmond Cohen points out how our current estimates of inequality underestimate exactly how much is being hidden. –  David Macdonald anticipates and criticizes ...

Michal Rozworski: Neoliberalism restructures work and pensions

On today’s show, two sociologists talk about aspects of neoliberal restructuring. First, Nicole Aschoff, sociologist, author of The New Prophets of Capital and until very recently managing editor of Jacobin magazine speaks with me about the auto industry, Trump and why globalization shouldn’t be solely blamed for the destruction of good jobs even while it ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: NAFTA: Suddenly, Everything’s on the Table

For years, we’ve been told the dictates of globalization, and the intrusive and prescriptive terms of free trade agreements in particular, are immutable, natural, and unquestionable.  (Read more…)When workers were displaced by the migration of multinational capital toward more profitable jurisdictions, we were told there’s nothing we can do about it except join the race ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – James Wilt writes that the PR campaign pushing pipelines is based largely on the false claim that the only other choice is to allow even more dangerous means of facilitating the burning of fossil fuels. And David Suzuki argues that the cost of addressing obvious environmental problems ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – David Blanchflower notes that there’s virtually no dispute that the UK is headed into an economic downturn – meaning that there’s also no excuse to hold off on fiscal relief for the public. And Brad DeLong points to a new study on the effectiveness of government spending in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Trevor Hancock writes that if we’re going to designate anything as a public health emergency, poverty should top the list: I was pleased to see the B.C. Ministry of Health use the powers of the provincial health officer to designate opioid drug overdose deaths a public-health emergency. But ...

A Different Point of View....: Mainstream media sucked in, report whatever politicians, GM say.

Note: In journalism school students are taught to report not what people say but what they do! All the big newspapers and TV networks breathlessly reported word-for-word what they were told at a recent joint political-General Motors newser: The Globe and Mail: “For decades, the splashy, job-creating announcements in the auto sector in Canada have been ...

A Different Point of View....: Mainstream media sucked in, report whatever politicians, GM say.

Note: In journalism school students are taught to report not what people say but what they do! All the big newspapers and TV networks breathlessly reported word-for-word what they were told at a recent joint political-General Motors newser: The Globe and Mail: “For decades, the splashy, job-creating announcements in the auto sector in Canada have been ...

A Different Point of View....: Mainstream media sucked in, report whatever politicians, GM say.

Note: In journalism school students are taught to report not what people say but what they do! All the big newspapers and TV networks breathlessly reported word-for-word what they were told at a recent joint political-General Motors newser: The Globe and Mail: “For decades, the splashy, job-creating announcements in the auto sector in Canada have been ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman writes that we’re far closer to a major energy transformation than many people realize – but that public policy decisions in the next few years may make all the difference in determining whether it materializes: According to a recent report by the investment firm Lazard, the ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Stanford Responds to Moffatt: Why I Still Worry About Auto Job Losses Under a TPP

My friend and fellow #cdnecon tweeter Mike Moffatt has published a thought-provoking commentary regarding the impact of the proposed Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) on Canada’s auto industry. Specifically, Mike engages critically with previous arguments I have made (on this site and elsewhere) that the TPP, as currently negotiated, could result in the ultimate loss of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Roderick Benns interviews Michael Clague about his work on a basic income dating back nearly fifty years. And Glen Pearson’s series of posts about a basic income is well worth a read. – Meanwhile, Julia Belluz interviews Sir Michael Marmot about the connection between inequality and poor social ...

Left Over: Composure Under Pressure…..

I am trying with  great difficulty to ignore the current campaign for a new Parliament and, if there is any justice, a  new PM. I have been also trying, somewhat unsuccessfully, to stop comparing and contrasting (thanks so much to all my Uni  profs. who beat that concept into my head….)  my own reality with ...

Left Over: Composure Under Pressure…..

I am trying with  great difficulty to ignore the current campaign for a new Parliament and, if there is any justice, a  new PM. I have been also trying, somewhat unsuccessfully, to stop comparing and contrasting (thanks so much to all my Uni  profs. who beat that concept into my head….)  my own reality with ...

Accidental Deliberations: On uncosted liabilities

So even from the sketchy details made public so far, and even leaving aside the more general harm done by limiting government action and entrenching corporate monopolies, the Trans-Pacific Partnership will cost Canada: $4.3 billion in compensation to dairy, chicken and egg farmers Up to 20,000 lost jobs in the auto sector – meaning both ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford discusses how the Trans-Pacific Partnership is renegotiating NAFTA – and taking away what little Canada salvaged in that deal. And Jared Bernstein highlights the TPP’s impact on prescription drug costs. – Rick Smith rightly challenges the effort some people have made to minimize the difference ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Haroon Siddiqui comments on the Cons’ tall economic tales. And Steven Chase and Greg Keenan note that workers are rightly fighting back against the Cons’ plan to sell out Canada’s auto parts industry and its 80,000 jobs. – Canadian Doctors for Medicare weighs in with its approval ...

Left Over: Auto-Immune to Progress: Car Manufacturing Going South

Carmakers say adios to Canada as Mexico shifts into higher gear Mexico now makes more cars than Canada, a trend that’s not expected to change By Pete Evans, CBC News Posted: Jun 15, 2015 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jun 15, 2015 9:31 AM ET   It’s deja vu all over again…I am old enough to ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada-EU trade deal will hurt Canada’s auto industry: study

by: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives | Press Release | May 28, 2014 OTTAWA – The proposed Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) will only exacerbate the Canadian auto industry’s recent decline, says a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The study, by Unifor economist and CCPA vice-president Jim Stanford, analyses CETA’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – PressProgress digs into the PBO’s report on tax giveaways to look at what Canada has lost from the Cons’ cuts to federal fiscal capacity – and how little has been gained as a trade-off: (T)he Harper government, by starving the public coffers, is losing $43 billion that could ...

LeDaro: Harper’s South Korea Trip

 I am not against free trade per se, it has its benefits in expanding markets and bringing our world together. When people are trading with each other and making money, they are much less likely to wage war on each other. However, we should not uncritically accept free trade deals. We must be cognizant of ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Economist

It started with a car accident in February, and the total loss of our 2004 Prius, which had only been ours for less than a year. We were quickly compensated for its market value and were in a position to buy another car, but we held off due to a looming sabbatical that would take ...

The Canadian Progressive: Federal Budget 2013: CAW demands full national manufacturing strategy for Canada

By: Canadian Auto Workers Union | Press Release: Billions in new federal supports for Canadian industry is a partial, but important, step forward in assisting the country’s embattled manufacturing sector, said CAW President Ken Lewenza, in response to Finance Minister Jim Flaherty’s budget released today. In his budget, Minister Flaherty outlined the federal […] The post Federal Budget ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ed Broadbent comments on both the growing problem of inequality, and the one institution which can do something about it: Canada is not doing better. From 1982 until 2004, almost all growth in family income went to the top 20 per cent, with much of that going to ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: CAW Major Auto Bargaining 2012: Lessons Learned

I am now finally emerging from the mental fog induced by the 24-7 triennial marathon otherwise known as “CAW major auto bargaining.” To close the circle, here are my thoughts in retrospect on the bargaining: how the union prepared for it, the issues at stake, the contents of the final deal, and the challenges that ...