Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Daniel Tencer reports on Pierre Kohler and Servaas Storm’s study showing that the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement figures to cost jobs and wages in Canada and across Europe.  – Jim Tankersley explains the initial rise of the stock market since November’s U.S. election, while offering reason to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sam Gindin discusses the future of labour organizing in the course of reviewing Jane McAlevey’s No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Guilded Age: (W)e have been struggling with how to combine building the union with raising larger, more political questions. One modest element of this, especially but ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kevin Connor reports that the more Ontario voters are exposed to the realities of public-private partnerships, the more they’re turning against the idea – with a quarter or less of respondents seeing any upside to handing public services over to businesses. Tony Keller writes that Canada’s history of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Karl Nerenberg examines new research from the Canadian Centre for the Study of Living Standards showing how workers have seen hardly any benefit from four decades of productivity gains which have filled corporate coffers: (I)n Canada, the productivity of labour — the amount workers produce per unit of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses the challenge of ensuring that stable jobs are available in Canada: Good jobs are a central mechanism in the creation of shared prosperity. What matters for workers is not just being able to find any job but also security of employment, level of pay, working conditions, and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Armine Yalnizyan points out the choice between a basic income and the provision of basic services, while making a strong case to focus on the latter: At the federal level, the cost of raising everyone’s income above the poverty line is an estimated $30 billion a year. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Willcocks discusses British Columbia’s two-tiered education system and the role it plays in exacerbating inequality – which is well worth keeping in mind as Saskatchewan deals with the fallout from the Wall government’s refusal to fund public schools. And Charlie Smith reviews Andrew MacLeod’s A Better Place ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jared Bernstein is hopeful that the era of expansive corporate rights agreements is coming to an end. Paul Krugman notes that there’s no evidence anybody has gained economically from the spread of those agreements other than the wealthy few pushing them through. And Stuart Trew has some suggestions ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Katie Hyslop contrasts Canada’s longstanding recognition that housing is a human right against the gross lack of policy action to ensure its availability: Canada has signed and ratified the 1976 United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and in Article 11 it does recognize ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Richard Eskow summarizes the basic facts about inequality in the U.S. Ta-Nehisi Coates argues that it’s impossible to fully explain or address that problem without factoring in ongoing racial disparities. And Sean Trembath writes about James Daschuk’s work in tracing health disparities among indigenous peoples back to Canada’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Duncan Brown discusses the connection between precarious work and low productivity. And Sara Mojtehedzadeh examines how Ontario’s workers’ compensation system is pushing injured individuals into grinding poverty by setting impossible requirements for claimants. – Jim Balsillie worries that the Trans-Pacific Partnership will only increase the tendency of profits ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Dani Rodrik discusses the evolution of work, and notes that future development and sharing of wealth may need to follow a different model than the one that’s applied in the past: (T)he post-industrial economy opened up a new chasm in the labor market, between those with stable, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Krugman reviews Robert Reich’s upcoming book, with a particular focus on the connection between corporate power and growing inequality: …Reich makes a very good case that widening inequality largely reflects political decisions that could have gone in very different directions. The rise in market power reflects a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford examines what Canada’s federal election says about our attitudes toward economic choices: (P)rogressives need to advance our own economic agenda, to fill the vacuum left by the failure of the Conservative vision. The modest infrastructure spending and small, temporary deficits that form the centerpiece of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Amy Goodman interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the corporate abuses the Trans-Pacific Partnership will allow to take priority over the public interest. And Stuart Trew and Scott Sinclair offer some suggestions to at least ensure that Canadians have an opportunity for meaningful review and discussion before being stuck ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Rosemary Barton discusses why it’s in Canada’s best interest on the global stage to work on building strong multilateral institutions (including the UN) rather than counting on bluster to make a difference. But Gus van Harten notes that we’re instead signing onto trade deals including the TPP ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Emmanuel Saez examines the U.S.’ latest income inequality numbers and finds that the gap between the wealthy few and everybody else is still growing. The Equality Trust finds that the UK’s tax system is already conspicuously regressive even as the Cameron Cons plan to make it more so. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jeff Spross argues that in addition to ensuring that employees are fairly paid for the overtime hours they work, we should also be pushing to ensure people aren’t required to work as much to begin with. And Angella MacEwen points out that any spin about increasing wages ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson weighs in on the need for our public policy to ensure a fair initial distribution of income and power in order to ensure that further redistribution is sustainable: The issue of how to deal with rising inequality and the squeezed middle-class has recently moved to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brad Delong discusses the two strains of neoliberalism which dominate far too much political discussion – and the reason why the left-oriented version doesn’t offer any plausible analysis of where we stand: (Bill) Clintonian left-neoliberalism makes two twin arguments. The first is addressed to the left: it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Sara Mojtehedzadeh highlights how Ontario employers are exploiting temporary workers rather than making any effort to offer jobs which can support a life: Under Ontario’s antiquated Employment Standards Act, which is currently under review, there is no limit on how long a company can employ a worker as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jeffrey Simpson lambastes the Cons’ determination to slash taxes and hand out baubles to the rich for the sole purpose of undermining the fiscal capacity of government to help Canadians. And Jeremy Nuttall highlights how a cuts to the CRA are allowing tax cheats to escape paying their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson argues that contrary to the attempt of the Ecofiscal Commission to impose right-wing values like tax slashing and devolution on any action to deal with climate change, we in fact need the federal government to take a lead role: While it is sensible in the current ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Pugh argues that we should take a serious look at a basic income, while Livia Gershon examines how even a small amount of guaranteed income has made an immense difference in the lives of families in one North Carolina town. And Walter Frick observes that strong social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – CBC reports on the latest research showing that Canada would save billions every year with a national pharmacare plan. And Thomas Walkom argues that politics are standing in the way of what should be a no-brainer from a policy standpoint. – Richard Gwyn writes that most Canadians seem ...