Alberta Politics: Madmen in the White House … this time it’s a thing, not just a ‘strategy’

PHOTOS: U.S. President Richard Nixon pointing the way to the exit for Donald Trump’s benefit. Below: Mr. Nixon about to board the helicopter that would take him away from Washington for the last time in an official capacity; a recent photo of President Trump; the sinister Dr. Henry Kissinger, then and now.  Richard Nixon wasn’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Campos compares the U.S.’ hourly wages to its GDP over the past few decades to show how workers have been left out of any economic growth. And Arindrajit Dube examines the effect of an increased minimum wage, and finds a direct impact on both income enhancement and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Andrew Jackson discusses the problems with increased corporate concentration of wealth and power – including the need for a response that goes beyond competition policies. In the 1960s, institutional economists like John Kenneth Galbraith described a world of oligopoly in which a few firms, such as the big ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes about the opportunities missed when governments restrict their economic policy to propping up the corporate sector, rather than seeking to innovate directly in the public interest: The received wisdom among economists used to be that governments should just set broad “framework” policies such as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Evening Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Linda McQuaig discusses the hollow promise of “populist” billionaires who ultimately serve only to enrich themselves and their class. And Lana Payne writes about the growing protest movement which culminated in massive rallies around the world this weekend – as well as the causes of its emergence: Over ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Anatole Kaletsky discusses the gross failures of market fundamentalism. And William Easterly points out that the risks to democratic governance which now seem to be materializing can be traced to the lack of a values-based defence of empowering people to decide their own future at the societal level. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Simon Enoch and Christine Saulnier examine how P3s are used to privilege corporate profits over the public interest: The CCPA has published numerous publications on the question of P3s because they have been so pervasive and so riddled with problems. There have been books written. Our organization ...

The Disaffected Lib: When the "Indispensible Nation" Becomes Expendable.

Writing in Foreign Policy, Max Boot argues that “Trump’s ‘America First’ Is the Twilight of American Exceptionalism.” Boot’s essay begins with an extensive catalogue of the similarities between Obama’s policies and what Trump will likely deliver. He finds Obama a latter day Jefferson and sees in Trump a 21st century Jacksonian. For those not familiar ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – George Monbiot rightly makes the point that a general attitude of kindness is a must for a functioning society – while lamenting that anything of the sort is all too often lacking from public policy choices. – James Di Fiore discusses Justin Trudeau’s failed attempt at a triangulation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board writes that while we can do more to provide supports to make workers less dependent on a single job, we shouldn’t pretend there’s nothing we can do to improve working conditions. And Lana Payne reminds Morneau and the Libs that there’s nothing inevitable about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses how the rise of right-wing, prejudiced populism can be traced to the failures of global corporate governance. And Dani Rodrik argues that it’s time to develop an international political system to facilitate – rather than overriding – democratic action: Some simple principles would reorient ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Jackson makes the case for a review of Canada’s tax system focused on boosting revenue from the wealthy people and corporations who can readily afford it: These tax loopholes are costly. Partial inclusion of capital gains in taxable income costs the federal government alone $3.6 billion ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses the challenge of ensuring that stable jobs are available in Canada: Good jobs are a central mechanism in the creation of shared prosperity. What matters for workers is not just being able to find any job but also security of employment, level of pay, working conditions, and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rick Salutin argues that we need to say no to any more trade agreements designed to privilege corporations at the expense of the public. Will Martin reports on the IMF’s long-overdue recognition of the failures of neoliberalism, while pointing out that there’s still a long way to go ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Finn comments on the history of neoliberalism – but notes that while the public is rightly skeptical of corporate spin, that awareness hasn’t yet translated into a strong alternative: (S)cores of well-known thinkers, writers, economists, and activists have vociferously denounced the many abuses of large business empires ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Robert Frank comments on the connection between recognizing the luck and social support which lead to one’s own success, and being willing to fund a state which will ensure opportunities for everybody: I’ve seen even brief discussions of the link between success and luck temper the outrage ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne writes about the need for a Bernie Sanders in Canada to highlight and oppose the privilege of the wealthy few: It is in this context of blatant unfairness — rules for the rich and rules for the rest — that politicians like Bernie Sanders have become ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives rounds up some noteworthy responses to the federal budget. Barbara Sibbald and Laura Eggertson write that while a few social determinants of health made the cut, our actual health care system will see virtually nothing. Armine Yalnizyan highlights how it falls short ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Nicholas Kristof points out how important a stable and effective public service looks from the standpoint of a country which doesn’t benefit from one. And Chi Onwurah discusses how the UK Cons – like their right-wing brethren elsewhere – are determined to move in the wrong direction: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses how large inheritance and accumulated capital lead to gross economic and social distortions: Inheritances are quite heavily concentrated among the most affluent families and thus compound income and wealth inequality over time. Inheritances continue to play a significant role in the accumulation of wealth in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Sarah Anderson, Marc Bayard, John Cavanagh, Chuck Collins, Josh Hoxie and Sam Pizzigati offer an outline as to how to fight back against growing inequality: § We need to see inequality as a deep systemic problem. Piecemeal interventions have not helped slow or reverse the pace of wealth ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson argues that a federal infrastructure program can and should be oriented toward developing a skilled and diverse workforce, rather than rewarding free-riding contractors who don’t contribute to those outcomes. And a joint statement from community and labour groups posted by Angella MacEwen argues that a major ...