Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how the Republican’s trillion-dollar corporate giveaway will only exacerbate inequality without doing anything to help the U.S.’ economy: If inequality was a problem before, enacting the Republicans’ proposed tax reform will make it much worse. Corporations and businesses will be among the big beneficiaries, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Steve Roth points out how extreme concentrations of wealth lead to poor economic and social outcomes: If wealth is consistently more widely dispersed — like it was after WW II — the extra spending that results causes more production. (Why, exactly, do you think producers produce things?) And ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Liam Byrne argues that it’s long past time to reevaluate an economic framework which has produced only highly concentrated wealth for a lucky few at everybody else’s expense. And Graeme Wearden reports on Oxfam’s call to rein in both firm-level tax avoidance, and government policy oriented toward eliminating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones highlights the toxic stress and other health problems borne disproportionately by members of the LGBT community who face systematic discrimination. And Tayla Smith and Jaitra Sathyandran discuss how temporary foreign workers (and others facing precarious work situations) tend to suffer preventable harm to their health ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Tim Harford discusses how insurance and other industries are built on exploiting people who are risk-averse due to the inability to absorb substantial costs as “money pumps” for those who have more than they need: (L)et’s step back and ask ourselves what insurance is for. Classical economics has ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Henning Meyer interviews Tony Atkinson about the readily-available options to combat inequality – with the first step being to make sure people actually have a voice in the decisions which define how wealth and power are allocated: So, if you dive into the potential solutions you seem to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – George Monbiot observes that while few people would want to drive animals to extinction directly, we’re all too often eager to settle for a consumerist culture which produces exactly that result. – Carol Linnitt reports on the Trudeau Libs’ appointment of an oil industry cheerleader to review the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – David Dayen and Ryan Grim write that “free trade” agreements are in fact turning into little more than cash cows for hedge funds and other big-money speculators: Under this system, a corporation invested in a foreign country can appeal to arbitration panels, consisting of three corporate lawyers, if that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dennis Howlett discusses the public costs of allowing tax avoidance – as Canada could afford a national pharmacare program (and much more) merely by ensuring that the rich pay what they owe: Eliminating tax haven use could save Canada almost $8 billion a year. That’s enough to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dennis Howlett discusses the public costs of allowing tax avoidance – as Canada could afford a national pharmacare program (and much more) merely by ensuring that the rich pay what they owe: Eliminating tax haven use could save Canada almost $8 billion a year. That’s enough to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – James Stewart examines how Donald Trump could be paying zero taxes using shelters designed specifically to enrich real estate developers while serving no social purpose. And Alexandra Thornton and Brendan Duke point out the “pass-through” loophole being exploited more and more by U.S. corporations. – Daniel Tencer ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Rafael Gomez and Juan Gomez offer a look at the state of Canadian workplace democracy, as well as some useful proposals to improve it. – The New York Times editorial board points out how the U.S.’ temporary worker programs are predictably being abused by employers to lower ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Coyne argues that the Senate’s role in overruling elected representatives – which only seems to be growing under the Trudeau Libs – represents an affront to democracy. And Duncan Cameron has some suggestions beyond proportional representation as to how our electoral system can better live up ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Hamilton Nolan interviews Branko Milanovic about inequality on both a national and international scale – and how there’s little reason to take heart in reductions in the latter if it’s paired with increases in the former: Gawker: Is it fair for people to ask what good the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Brent Patterson points out the continued dangers of extrajudicial challenges to laws under the CETA. And John Jacobs examines (PDF) the likelihood that reduced tariffs under the Trans-Pacific Partnership would mostly push Canada toward further dependence on resource extraction. – Ken Jacobs, Zohar Perla, Ian Perry and Dave ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrea Germanos follows up on the IMF’s realization that handing free money and power to corporations does nothing for the economy as it affects people’s lives. And Susie Cagle examines the role of tech money – like other massive accumulations of wealth – in exacerbating inequalities in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Johnna Montgomerie makes the case to treat austerity as a failed experiment. But Laura Basu points out that misleading coverage of economic and fiscal news has led far too many people to see the damage done by austerity as originating from other sources. – Meanwhile, the Economist examines ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Christopher May writes that any full examination of political  dynamics needs to take into account corporations as sources of power, not merely economic actors: (R)ecognising corporations as institutions of global governance encourages an analysis of the operation of power (in its various dimensions) within an important realm of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rachel Bryce, Cristina Blanco Iglesias, Ashley Pullman and Anastasia Rogova examine the effect of inequality on education in Canada. And John McMurtry comments on the increasing hoarding of wealth and the lack of anything left over for the rest of us. – Emily Badger highlights the “million dollar ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Roderick Benns interviews Michael Clague about his work on a basic income dating back nearly fifty years. And Glen Pearson’s series of posts about a basic income is well worth a read. – Meanwhile, Julia Belluz interviews Sir Michael Marmot about the connection between inequality and poor social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mike Barber highlights how Canada’s federal election campaign was dominated by messages pushed from the top down rather than citizens’ concerns. Erna Paris recognizes that we can’t afford to be complacent about the place of outright bigotry in shaping voters’ decisions. And Christopher Flavelle writes that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Robyn Benson offers her take on the importance of the Trans-Pacific Partnership as an election issue. Peter Mazereeuw notes that the nominal labour protections in the TPP – which were of course negotiated without workers having a seat at the table – won’t mean anything if governments ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Mariana Mazzucato argues that in deciding how to vote, we need to challenge the Cons’ assumptions as to what the federal government can do to encourage development: Markets are themselves are outcomes of different types of public and private sector investments in new areas. Countries like Italy that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford discusses how the Trans-Pacific Partnership is renegotiating NAFTA – and taking away what little Canada salvaged in that deal. And Jared Bernstein highlights the TPP’s impact on prescription drug costs. – Rick Smith rightly challenges the effort some people have made to minimize the difference ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that reliance on temporary and disposable labour is utterly incompatible with long-term economic development. And Joey Hartman and Adrienne Montani comment on Vancouver’s efforts to support a living wage rather than grinding down employment standards. – Andy Skuce points out that our already-worrisome best estimates ...