Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Steve Burgess points out that we shouldn’t be the least bit surprise by the latest news of politically-connected billionaires managing to tilt the tax system in their favour. Ed Broadbent calls for a much-needed end to tax policy that favours the wealthy in efforts to avoid contributing to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rupert Neate reports on a new study showing that the world’s 1,500-odd billionaires between them control over $6 trillion in wealth. – Stuart Trew sets out Canada’s choice between corporate-oriented trade deals such as the CETA, or sustainable and fairly-distributed economic development. And Laurie Monsebraaten writes about the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Nathaniel Lewis and Matt Bruenig discuss the relationship between massive inheritances and ongoing wealth inequality. Nick Hanauer makes the case for much higher taxes on the wealthy as part of a plan for improved economic development, while a new Ipsos poll finds that three-quarters of Americans are ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on what the Wall government means when it talks about entering into “partnerships” with the corporate sector – and why Saskatchewan’s citizens shouldn’t stand to be cut out of the Crown assets now owned for public benefit. For further reading…– Others have also noted the “partnership” phrasing used by the Saskatchewan Party in identifying ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michal Rozworski highlights how UK Labour’s platform provides for a needed move toward the democratization of economic activity along with an end to gratuitous austerity. And a distinguished group of economists has signed on to support the plan. – Charlie Skelton examines how this year’s Bilderberg conference is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Diane Cardwell points out how carbon politics are threatening renewable energy just at the point where it would win a fair fight against fossil fuels. And J. David Hughes finds that any case for Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline falls apart in the face of realistic assumptions about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Paul Krugman criticizes the use of non-compete agreements to trap workers at low wage levels with no opportunity to pursue comparable employment – as well as the Republicans’ insistence on pushing employer-based health care which further limits workers’ options: At this point, in other words, noncompete clauses are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jordan Brennan and Kaylie Tiessen write that it’s long past time to set a level of federal revenue sufficient to support the social programs Canadians want: In the decades since [corporate-driven] reforms were undertaken, Canada experienced a significant deterioration in its macroeconomic performance: business investment has worsened and ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall’s costly and counterproductive decision to trash the Saskatchewan Transportation Company mirrors his government’s worst traits. For further reading…– Jason Warick reported here on the plan to shut down STC – as well as the absurd day-long shutdown of the service for nothing more than communications purposes. And the government’s excuses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jordon Cooper writes that the Saskatchewan Party’s slash-and-burn budget confirms that for them, the poor don’t matter. CBC reports on the devastating effect the budget will have on municipalities, while Courtney Markewitch reports that Saskatoon’s city council is fighting back. And Joel Senick notes that the planned shutdown ...

The Wheatsheaf: Declining service

During the Lorne Calvert era, the NDP and Saskatchewan Party engaged in simplistic debates on the merits of crown corporations. Brad Wall used to stand up, get red in the face with veins popping from his neck as if he was about to blow a gasket and shout about the NDP “picking winners and losers”. ...