Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David MacDonald discusses the need to start tackling some of Canada’s most expensive and least justifiable tax handouts to the rich: The richest 10 per cent of Canadians enjoy an average of $20,500 a year in tax exemptions, credits, and other loopholes. That’s $6,000 more than in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Baratunde Thurston makes the point that even beyond income and wealth inequality, there’s an obviously unfair distribution of second chances in the U.S. depending on one’s race and class. Denis Campbell reports on the link between poverty and childhood obesity, while Jen St. Denis highlights how poverty ...

The Canadian Progressive: Ontario defends freedom of expression, passes anti-SLAPP legislation

Ontario has passed a law to counter Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPPs), lawsuits often used by deep-pocketed businesses to silence debate on public issues. The post Ontario defends freedom of expression, passes anti-SLAPP legislation appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Saturday reading. – Lana Payne writes that we’re seeing exactly the results we should expect from Stephen Harper’s foolish choice to push money upward: A recent Globe and Mail story, using data from Statistics Canada, pointed out just how poorly the job market is doing under Stephen Harper’s leadership. “Employment growth ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how user reviews and the wisdom of crowds don’t do us much good if businesses are able to silence anything that raises concerns about them. For further reading…– Laura K makes a similar point here. – CBC reports on libel chill here, including a discussion of the Ottawa property manager which managed to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Chris Matthews takes note of the gross growth of inequality in the U.S. Dean Baker notes that much of the wealth built on what’s branded as “innovation” reflects little more than successful attempts to evade health, safety and consumer protection laws. And Mike De Souza explores how the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Bill Maher offers some simple math and important observations about inequality: – And Gary Engler proposes ten ways to build a better economic system. – Vanessa Brcic points out that corporatized medicine is as unethical as it is inefficient. And Garry Patterson laments the premiers’ weak response ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Neera Tanden points out that a wide range of citizens rely on a strong safety net at one time or another – and suggests that it’s long past time to start discussing how important social programs have been in our own lives: I believe we have a historic ...

Environmental Law Alert Blog: Lack of footnotes costs fish farm activist $75,000

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 On Monday, July 22nd the BC Court of Appeal ordered well-known anti- fish farm activist Don Staniford to pay $75,000 in damages because the mock cigarette packages he had made criticizing Norwegian fish farm companies lacked footnotes. What does this mean for fish farm activists?  For the most part, the lessons ...