Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Abacus Data has polled the Canadian public on climate change, and found far more appetite for meaningful action than we generally hear from the political class (and particularly right-wing parties): Twenty years ago, when the world’s leaders were debating the Kyoto Accord, a case could be made ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Michael Paarlberg discusses how the ratchet effect is making American health care far more durable than Republicans may have realized – while recognizing that there’s a lesson to be drawn for the design of other social programs as to the value of a broad constituency of support. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: On discriminatory treatment

Following up on this post, let’s take a look at Tom Parkin’s other recent post which offers plenty of food for thought. Parkin’s view broadly matches Guy Caron’s position on Quebec’s treatment of people who wear niqabs – but seems to me to fall short of making the case for deferring to Quebec’s politicians when ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017: The Quebec Question

Don MacPherson has joined the many commentators whose main take on the federal NDP’s leadership race is to zero in on how Quebec voters might react to Jagmeet Singh’s Sikh background and head covering. And Adam Radwanski has rightly challenged the pundits’ consensus to some extent. But (as noted in part by Ian Capstick) the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Colin Gordon discusses how contempt for democracy is one of the uniting principles of the right around the globe while reviewing Nancy MacLean’s Democracy in Chains: At the intersection of Buchanan’s market fundamentalism and his embrace of Jim Crow lies a fundamental reservation — nakedly evident on today’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Gary Younge examines how Jeremy Corbyn and an unabashedly progressive campaign platform are making massive gains in a UK general election cynically called to exploit Labour’s perceived weakness: Seeing the response to Labour’s election manifesto last week was a clear illustration of just how powerful the amnesiac qualities ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Neil Irwin writes that many progressive policies – including child care and income tax credits – serve the goal of facilitating economic participation far better than their right-wing “supply side” counterparts. – Ann Pettifor examines the future of globalization, and warns that a failure to properly regulate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ethan Cox reports on new polling showing that Canadians are highly concerned about inequality – even if our governments aren’t doing anywhere meaningful to address it: Of Canadians surveyed, 73 per cent said their and their family’s economic situation had stayed the same or gotten worse over the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Owen Jones writes that excessive reliance on corporate profiteers is the reason why the UK’s trains don’t run on time. And Nora Loreto argues that postal banking is needed (among other reasons) to rein in abuses by Canada’s biggest banks. – Shannon Daub examines what British Columbia’s voters ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Linda McQuaig discusses the need to fight fake news about Canada’s health care system (and the corporate raiders trying to amplify it): (I)t was with some pleasure last week that I watched as a Republican congressman tried to insist that Canadians routinely flock to the U.S. for health ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: We won’t walk to a nearby walking trail #nlpoli

The Town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay commissioned a consultant to look at possible future development of a sand pit in a residential area of the town. You can read the report at the town website. The consultants first held a public meeting open to all town residents.  Then they tried other ways of soliciting opinions, ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: We won’t walk to a nearby walking trail #nlpoli

The Town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay commissioned a consultant to look at possible future development of a sand pit in a residential area of the town. You can read the report at the town website. The consultants first held a public meeting open to all town residents.  Then they tried other ways of soliciting opinions, ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how the North Saskatchewan River oil spill may not lead directly to a needed reevaluation of the risks of pipelines – but a public expectation that we’ll shift away from dirty energy may be more significant in the long run. For further reading…– I’ve previously posted about Brad Wall’s response to ...

Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Glenn Greenwald interviews Alex Cuadros about his new book on how Brazil has been warped politically and economically by the whims of its billionaire class. And PressProgress takes a look at the impact of economic inequality on Canada’s cities. – Sharon Wright examines how draconian restrictions on social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – John Milloy discusses the difference between trade and corporate control – while noting that recent “trade agreements” have tended to favour the latter without being the subject of meaningful public debate: For far too long, elites have characterized trade discussions as too complicated for the general public to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jeff Guo reports on Peter Lindert and Jeffrey Williamson’s research showing how the U.S. went from standing out internationally for its relatively equal distribution of wealth, to being equally exceptional in its inequality: In the Revolutionary era, inequality in America was dramatically lower than it was in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Martin Lukacs highlights the Canadian public’s broad support for the Leap Manifesto – and the opportunity available to any party willing to put its contents into practice. And Shawn Katz is hopeful that the NDP will seize the opening. But Bill Tieleman points out that the best intentions ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: MQO poll shows big Liberal slide #nlpoli

Just for the fun of comparison, here’s the CRA polling results for a year covering the last time the provincial government saw a change of party and the new crowd introduced a killer budget no one expected. The Conservatives dropped from 55 points in November 2003 to 33 points in May of the next year. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sean McElwee examines how the wealthy control the U.S.’ political system, while public opinion plays far too little role in policy choices: A comprehensive study by Grossmann finds that public opinion was a significant factor in 25 percent of policy changes since 1945. More influential factors have included ...

Alberta Politics: Poll puts NDP in third place among Albertans – a plausible result despite a pollster’s debatable analysis

PHOTOS: Alberta Premier Rachel Notley. Below: Pollster Quito Maggi of Mainstreet Research, grabbed from his Twitter account, and former PC premier Ed Stelmach, whose personal popularity held through the economic downturn of 2007 and 2008. Late last week, the Calgary Herald reported the results of a poll that indicated Alberta’s NDP government has “plummeted” to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – PressProgress weighs in on the OECD’s findings that Canada’s income inequality is significantly worse than previously assumed. Didier Jacobs argues that our current economic system is anything but meritocratic. And Paul Morrison points out how a poorly-designed tax system forces low-income workers to pay massive effective taxes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Nicholas Fitz observes that inequality is far worse than the U.S. public believes – even as it already wants to see significant action. And Thomas Piketty updates his policy prescriptions arising out of Capital: As I look back at my discussion of future policy proposals in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Paul Edwards discusses the availability of a gradual transition to clean energy while avoiding more than 2 degrees of climate change – but only if we start swapping out fossil fuels for renewable energy now. And Christopher Grainger argues that a space race-style approach to research and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Whittaker reminds us that the American public is eager for a far more fair distribution of income than the one provided for by the U.S.’ current political and economic ground rules. But Christo Aivalis writes that there’s a difference between a preference and a cause – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Michael Leachman debunks the claim that progressive tax rates on the rich cause any problems from an economic development standpoint. And Daisy Srblin argues for a strong and unapologetic movement toward a fairer tax system: It is now up to the left to provide an alternative. Let’s ...