Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Trade Justice reports on Justin Trudeau’s role in pushing for an international corporate giveaway through a new Trans-Pacific Partnership – even as the country whose capital class largely shaped it before has no interest in participating. And James Munson reports that Justin Trudeau is officially more secretive ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Libs’ delayed climate change action as going beyond mere backloading of promises to outright destruction in the meantime. For further reading…– For just a few examples of the backloading in the Libs’ budget, see the Northern View’s interview with Nathan Cullen. – The latest report to the United Nations Framework Convention on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Hemingway reviews the evidence on two-tiered medicine from around the developed world, and concludes that a constitutional attack on universal health care would only result in our paying more for less. – Marc Lee takes a look at the national climate change framework released last week and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Broadbent, Michal Hay and Emilie Nicolas theorize that Canada’s left is on the rise. Matt Karp takes a look at the policy preferences of younger American voters, including a strong willingness to fund far better social programs than are currently available. And N+1 responds to the rise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron offers his take on the Paris climate change conference. Martin Lukacs notes that while the agreement reached there may not accomplish anywhere near what we need, the building climate movement should provide more hope than we’ve had to this point. Similarly, Thomas Walkom sees the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Matthew Yglesias rightly points out the absurdity of monetary policy designed to rein in at-target inflation at the expense of desperately-needed employment. And Joseph Stiglitz reminds us that we can instead make policy choices which will fix inequality rather than exacerbating it: Beyond changing taxes and government ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Joseph Stiglitz writes that inequality is killing the American middle class. And Crawford Kilian examines the direct connection between inequality and midlife mortality: For some white Americans born between 1961 and 1970, however, something has gone wrong. They grew up in what should have been a wonderful ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Paul Mason weighs in on how income and wealth inequality spill over into every corner of a person’s life: It is very possible to be poor in the 21st-century welfare state. One in five children lives in poverty, and this decade will see the first rise in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jordan Brennan studies the relationship between corporate taxes and the economy, and finds that the promise of growth in exchange for corporate giveaways has proven entirely illusory. – Andy McSmith looks at another of the consequences of the trend toward corporate control, as the UK has seen the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Rosemary Barton reports on the Libs’ announcement of increased funding to help developing countries fight climate change – which does represent a noteworthy improvement on the Cons’ comparative stinginess. But as I’ve noted, it doesn’t much help to deal with only one aspect of the issue – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Burning questions

Does anybody actually believe for a second that a Republican-dominated Congress will be more willing to ratify a climate change treaty simply because it doesn’t contain binding targets? And if not, doesn’t a deliberate failure to include binding targets mean primarily that even if countries can agree on a treaty which could be ratified in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Olive talks to Robert Reich about his work fighting inequality: There are certain irrefutable facts besides water always running downhill. There is no arguing, for instance, that the U.S. era Reich describes as the “Great Prosperity” — the three-decade span between the late 1940s and the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon explains how higher taxes on the wealthy can be no less a boon for the economy than for the goal of social equality: In fact, empirical analysis shows that while the relationship between higher taxes and economic growth is complex, there is no proof that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Julie Delahanty discusses the need for Canada’s federal government to rein in rising inequality. And Tim Stacey duly challenges the excuse that today’s poor people just aren’t poor enough to deserve any consideration. – Amy Goodman interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the serious problems with the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Andrea ...

Accidental Deliberations: On suckers’ bets

We’ve sure learned some important lessons from the failure of the first billion-dollar Boundary Dam CCS project: SaskPower’s president, Mike Marsh, says the company had hoped to make a decision on whether to retrofit another two units at Boundary Dam power plant by next year. But on Monday, Marsh told reporters that decision has been ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Chris Hedges weighs in on the Trans-Pacific Partnership’s entrenchment of corporate control over mere citizens, while PressProgress highlights just a few of the more obvious dangers it poses. And Blayne Haggart points out that the TPP has nothing at all to do with free trade. TPP-like agreements ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford examines what Canada’s federal election says about our attitudes toward economic choices: (P)rogressives need to advance our own economic agenda, to fill the vacuum left by the failure of the Conservative vision. The modest infrastructure spending and small, temporary deficits that form the centerpiece of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Teresa Ghilarducci laments both the state of the union movement in the U.S., and the lack of any public discussion as to how to rebuild the strongest voice most citizens have against corporate excesses. And Bob Bryan recognizes that unions are nothing short of necessary to a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Andrew Jackson discusses a few of the choices the Trudeau Libs need to get right in order to actually set Canada on a more progressive fiscal path: Progressives who worry about growing income inequality will note two key features of the new government’s tax plans. First, the plan ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how Canada’s attendance at the Paris climate change conference may prove to be utterly useless if Justin Trudeau isn’t prepared to override Brad Wall’s obstruction. For further reading…– Trudeau’s show of inclusion is discussed here – and there’s certainly reason to think he’s less directly hostile to climate action than his ...