The Progressive Economics Forum: Self-insurance for workers doesn’t work

This is a guest post from Rod Hill, a Professor of Economics at the University of New Brunswick, Saint John campus. A previous version of this post first appeared in the New Brunswick Telegraph Journal. In a report this month for the Halifax-based Atlantic Institute for Market Studies (AIMS), entitled “An Alternative to Employment Insurance”, ...

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: An Unimaginable Choice: Trading Parental Rights for Care

A CBC freedom of information request to the Nova Scotia government has revealed a terrible reality for children with mental illness and their families. Children too ill for the province’s 15 group homes are housed in residential facilities. But between January 2011 and December 2016, 2,655 of those children were reported missing.  What makes the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Angella MacEwen offers her suggestions as to what a fair and progressive trade agenda should look like: Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) mechanisms are especially unpopular, as they prioritize investor rights over investor responsibilities. Canada and Mexico have had similar dismal experiences under NAFTA — while the US has ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: The Alternative Federal Budget 2017

This year’s Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) was released on March 9. I was proud to be the primary author of its housing chapter (that chapter is available in English here and in French here). The first AFB exercise began in 1994, with the first AFB being published in 1995. That involved a joint effort between ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jordan Brennan points out why Nova Scotia (and other jurisdictions) should move past austerity economics: The McNeil Liberals appear set to rack up budgetary surpluses through a strategy of public sector wage suppression. This is likely to backfire. It is an elementary insight of economic analysis that, ...

Politics, Re-Spun: A Glimpse of Last Week in White, Male Supremacy

People, especially people who are white and male: we need to drastically up our game if we are going to move towards equity and away from the increasingly brutal white male backlash that’s been growing. Last week a number of things happened that reinforce the supremacy of white men, but also the rise in those ...

A BCer in Ottawa: Eating up the Hill: A taste of Nova Scotia

Last Tuesday was a reception I and many other hill dwellers had circled on our calendar weeks ago: the Taste of Nova Scotia reception. And with dreams of lobster rolls and scallops in our heads, we descended on the Sir John A. MacDonald building in droves. Unfortunately, many of us were turned away. For the ...

A BCer in Ottawa: Eating up the Hill: A taste of Nova Scotia

Last Tuesday was a reception I and many other hill dwellers had circled on our calendar weeks ago: the Taste of Nova Scotia reception. And with dreams of lobster rolls and scallops in our heads, we descended on the Sir John A. MacDonald building in droves. Unfortunately, many of us were turned away. For the ...

A BCer in Ottawa: Eating up the Hill: A taste of Nova Scotia

Last Tuesday was a reception I and many other hill dwellers had circled on our calendar weeks ago: the Taste of Nova Scotia reception. And with dreams of lobster rolls and scallops in our heads, we descended on the Sir John A. MacDonald building in droves. Unfortunately, many of us were turned away. For the ...

Montreal Simon: Why Nova Scotia Should Stop Honouring a War Criminal

For eighty-five years the statue of Lieutenant General Edward Cornwallis has loomed over a park in Halifax.To honour him for being the first governor of Nova Scotia, and the founder of Halifax.In recent years native groups have tried to have the statue taken down and his name removed from other parks, streets and buildings in Nova ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: C-51 Stops a Veteran From Being a Liberal Candidate

I wondered why Peter MacKay’s Liberal challenger was quitting too, and it seems the reason was how Trudeau mishandled the C-51 “anti terrorism” vote by supporting the bad bill. Since MacKay is quitting too for other reasons, Central Nova will be a riding to watch again. Now-former LPC candidate on #C51: "a repressive act which ...

Alberta Politics: $15 is too low, and three years is too long to wait, for a higher Alberta minimum wage

PHOTOS: Greetings from Halifax, where a minimum wage almost as low as Alberta’s isn’t half of what a two-earner family needs to live a decent life. Can it be much different in Calgary or Edmonton? Below: Enthusiastic Tweeter Dan Kelly’s Twitter thumbnail; Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci. HALIFAX, N.S. The biggest problem with the Alberta ...

Alberta Politics: One government change and Big Tobacco’s effort to sidestep menthol cigarette ban goes up in smoke

PHOTOS: Young cigarette smokers. Youthful menthol smokers in Alberta may not appear exactly as illustrated, although it’ll stunt their growth just the same. Below: Health Minister Sarah Hoffman and former health minister Stephen Mandel. HALIFAX, N.S. What next? Apparently Alberta’s NDP government is now making decisions based on the best interests of the province’s citizens! ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alison picks up on Armine Yalnizyan’s important question as to whether the Cons have a Plan B other than hoping for factors beyond our control to boost oil prices. And Brad Delong argues that based on the foreseeable direction of our economy, we need a stronger public ...

The Canadian Progressive: Nova Scotia is not ready for fracking

An independent panel commissioned by the government of Nova Scotia to examine the impact of hydraulic fracturing has concluded that Nova Scotia is not read for fracking. The post Nova Scotia is not ready for fracking appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ralph Surette suggests that Nova Scotia’s tax and regulatory review pay close attention to the fact that it can do more than simply slash both: Nova Scotia already has relatively low corporate taxes and lower than average taxes for the highest earners. Yet none of this can seem ...

Political Eh-conomy: Working class disarmed, Canadian redux

Looking at the prevalence of strikes in the US over the past six decades, Doug Henwood writes, Second Amendment fetishism aside, there’s an old saying that the working class’s ultimate weapon is withholding labor through slowdowns and strikes. By that measure, the U.S. working class has been effectively disarmed since the 1980s. Doug then produces ...

A BCer in Toronto: Lessons from Stephen McNeil’s landslide Liberal victory in Nova Scotia

As part of the Liberal Party of Canada biennial session this afternoon on provincial and municipal best practices, we got an inside look at how the Nova Scotia Liberals won a historic majority government from campaign director (and federal Liberal VP English) Chris MacInnes. And Premier Stephen McNeil was in the room, just to keep ...

The Canadian Progressive: Nova Scotians overwhelmingly support continued ban on fracking

A just released poll shows that Nova Scotians overwhelmingly support a continued moratorium on fracking, unless an independent review finds there is no risk to drinking water, human health, the climate or communities. The post Nova Scotians overwhelmingly support continued ban on fracking appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Leading the evidence

Paul MacLeod’s post-mortem of Nova Scotia’s election campaign is well worth a read. But following up on Kevin Milligan’s astute point, I’ll point out how one of the main factors in the outcome looks to hint at partisan politics taking yet another turn for the worse – even as it signals what activists may need ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: Taxing Through Taxes

Despite not hailing from Nova Scotia, I suppose its time that we sat down and talked about what happened in the province. Though, this post will only touch on the topic; rather, we’re going to focus on something a bit grander that comes out of that discussion. Now, as a non-resident, I can only form ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: Taxing Through Taxes

Despite not hailing from Nova Scotia, I suppose its time that we sat down and talked about what happened in the province. Though, this post will only touch on the topic; rather, we’re going to focus on something a bit grander that comes out of that discussion. Now, as a non-resident, I can only form ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: Taxing Through Taxes

Despite not hailing from Nova Scotia, I suppose its time that we sat down and talked about what happened in the province. Though, this post will only touch on the topic; rather, we’re going to focus on something a bit grander that comes out of that discussion. Now, as a non-resident, I can only form ...

Accidental Deliberations: On legacies

Obviously last night’s Nova Scotia election results represent a huge disappointment for the NDP. But they also offer some reason to discuss the brand being developed at both the provincial and federal levels. The working assumption for both the federal party and most of the provincial parties close to forming government has been that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The National Post offers an excerpt from Susan Delacourt’s Shopping for Votes discussing the role branding played in the election of John Diefenbaker. And Jeffrey Simpson discusses the continued drift toward consumer politics.– But in commenting on the Nova Scotia provincial election, Ralph Surette reminds us what’s lost ...