Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Collinson discusses how insecure work makes it impossible to reliably structure an individual’s life: Many respondents told us about how difficult it is to budget without knowing how much you’ll be earning from one week to the next. The number of hours we are given every ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Simon Enoch explains why the Sask Party’s plans to inflict an austerian beating until economic morale improves is doomed to failure: It is now abundantly clear that the Saskatchewan government’s “transformational change” agenda is in reality a not-so-subtle euphemism for provincewide austerity in response to the current ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The Canadian Labour Congress offers its suggestions as to how international trade agreements can be reworked to ensure a more fair global economy. But Bill Curry reports that we’re first more likely to see public interest regulation undermined from within Canada as the provinces sign away their authority ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Per Molander examines new research on the sources of inequality which concludes that massive gaps in wealth and income inevitably arise purely out of chance rather than any individual merit: Differences in income or assets that are based on differences in capabilities or effort are widely considered to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Hemingway reviews the evidence on two-tiered medicine from around the developed world, and concludes that a constitutional attack on universal health care would only result in our paying more for less. – Marc Lee takes a look at the national climate change framework released last week and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Community Food Centres Canada highlights the need for social assistance benefits to keep up with the cost of living, while noting that Ontario (among other jurisdictions) has fallen well behind in that task: It’s been far too long since social assistance rates have been viewed through the ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Libs’ carbon price rollout managed to maximize the resulting sound and fury while signifying little actual progress. For further reading…– Marc Lee offered a reality check on the minimal effect of Justin Trudeau’s price announcement, with reference to Marc Jaccard’s study here (PDF). And Karri Munn-Venn also pointed out how a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein discusses how Canada’s longstanding – if far from inevitable – identity as a resource economy is standing in the way of both needed action on climate change and reconciliation with First Nations: In Canada, cultivation and industrialization were secondary. First and foremost, this country was ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Wells argues that climate change and First Nations reconciliation – two of the issues which the Libs have tried to turn into signature priorities – look set to turn into areas of weakness as Justin Trudeau continues his party’s tradition of dithering. And Martin Lukacs writes that ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada cannot fulfill Paris Agreement, call to action on climate change while creating more tar sands pipelines

More tar sands pipelines means going in reverse on the climate action Canada needs to fulfill the Paris Agreement and its call to action on climate change. The post Canada cannot fulfill Paris Agreement, call to action on climate change while creating more tar sands pipelines appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Broadbent, Michal Hay and Emilie Nicolas theorize that Canada’s left is on the rise. Matt Karp takes a look at the policy preferences of younger American voters, including a strong willingness to fund far better social programs than are currently available. And N+1 responds to the rise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses how large inheritance and accumulated capital lead to gross economic and social distortions: Inheritances are quite heavily concentrated among the most affluent families and thus compound income and wealth inequality over time. Inheritances continue to play a significant role in the accumulation of wealth in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford offers a warning to Australia about Canada’s history of gratuitous corporate tax giveaways: (S)uccessive cuts reduced combined Canadian corporate taxes (including provincial rates, which also fell in several provinces) from near 50 per cent of pre-tax income in the early 1980s, to 26 per cent ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Matthew Yglesias rightly points out the absurdity of monetary policy designed to rein in at-target inflation at the expense of desperately-needed employment. And Joseph Stiglitz reminds us that we can instead make policy choices which will fix inequality rather than exacerbating it: Beyond changing taxes and government ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Mariana Mazzucato discusses the futility of slashing government without paying attention to what it’s intended to accomplish. And Sheila Block and Kaylie Tiessen are particularly critical of Ontario’s short-term sell-offs which figure to harm public services and revenues alike in the long run: The sale of Hydro One ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – David Ball talks to Joseph Stiglitz about inequality and its causes – including the spread of corporate control through trade agreements: What would you say is the dominant cause [of growing inequality]? The weak economy, partly associated with austerity, has led to a weak labour market. The official ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lars Osberg discusses the positive effects of raising taxes on Canada’s wealthiest few. And Avram Denburg argues for a speedy end to income splitting due to both its unfairness,and its impact on the public revenue needed to fund a healthier society: (I)ncome splitting primarily benefits middle- and upper-income ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Michael Leachman debunks the claim that progressive tax rates on the rich cause any problems from an economic development standpoint. And Daisy Srblin argues for a strong and unapologetic movement toward a fairer tax system: It is now up to the left to provide an alternative. Let’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – tcnorris highlights how the Cons’ gratuitous cuts are undermining their hopes of staying in power. And Eric Pineault discusses the costs of austerity for Quebec in particular and Canada as a whole: (C)utting into spending slows down growth and keeps the economy in a stagnation trap. The resulting ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – The Broadbent Institute details Rhys Kesselman’s research on how the Cons’ expanded TFSAs are nothing but a giveaway to the wealthy. And Dean Beeby reports on their withholding of EI supplements from the families who most need them – paired with a complete lack of responsibility or ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – LOLGOP discusses the important role unions play in ensuring widespread freedom and prosperity – and why they’re thus target number one for corporatists seeking to hoard more wealth at the top: When Scott Walker promises to bring his anti-union policies that have help lead Wisconsin to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Gerald Caplan writes that we all bear some responsibility for growing inequality – and how we’ll need to use our electoral power to reverse it: (S)elf-sacrifice is not going to be the key to reducing inequality, with all the great damage it inflicts on society. Government needs to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Stephanie Levitz reports on the Broadbent Institute’s study showing that Con-friendly charities haven’t been facing any of the strict scrutiny being used to silence anybody who dares to speak up for environmental or social causes. And Jeremy Nuttall notes that the problem is probably worse than it seems ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Marc Lee looks in detail at the risks involved in relying on tar sands development as an economic model: The UK outfit Carbon Tracker was the first to point out this means we are seeing a “carbon bubble” in our financial markets – that  fossil fuel companies, whose business ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Marc Lee writes that British Columbia has learned nothing about the dangers of staple economics. But Christy Clark has certainly learned something from her predecessor’s playbook: one term after Gordon Campbell’s promise not to impose an HST fell by the wayside immediately after he’d secured another four years ...