Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Noah Smith writes that far too many Americans (like people around the globe) face needless barriers to thinking, and suggests that the key public project of this century may be to remedy those problems: The biggest threat to clear-headedness comes from drugs. The twin epidemics of opioid-painkiller ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Mainstreet has released what looks to be the most useful poll of the campaign so far, showing Charlie Angus and Niki Ashton in the lead among a substantial number of self-identified NDP members. But the gap between Angus and Ashton is tiny compared to the number ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Brian Jones rightly argues that a fair tax system would go a long way toward eliminating any serious concerns about government deficits. And Marco Chown Oved offers some reason for optimism in the Canada Revenue Agency’s response to the Panama Papers. – David Macdonald examines what could have ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Steve Roth discusses how inequality and excessive concentration of wealth result in less growth for everybody – even as the researchers finding that correlation try to report the opposite. – Meanwhile, Davide Furceri and Prakash Loungani examine how loose financial and capital regulation lead to more severe ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Les Leopold rightly argues that financial and political elites won’t offer a more fair distribution of wealth or power unless they’re forced to do so: Right now, we lack a robust mass movement with the power to reclaim our economy and our democracy to make it work for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Luke Savage warns that the Libs’ election win may ring hollow for Canadian progressives: Throughout its democratic history, Canadian politics have basically oscillated between two parties that do not seriously threaten the status quo or the injustices it perpetuates. Occasionally goaded by organized populist movements, they have both ...