Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Louis-Philippe Rochon chimes in on why Justin Trudeau’s faux populism is entirely beyond belief when compared to his actions while in power: Since coming to power, the prime minister has openly pursued policies that have only exacerbated the economic situation by raising corporate profits, and by contributing to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Louis-Philippe Rochon chimes in on why Justin Trudeau’s faux populism is entirely beyond belief when compared to his actions while in power: Since coming to power, the prime minister has openly pursued policies that have only exacerbated the economic situation by raising corporate profits, and by contributing to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jesse Ferreras reports that Canada’s supposed job growth has included almost nothing but part-time and precarious work. And Louis-Philippe Rochon points out how the influence of the financial sector has led to economic choices which serve nobody else’s interests: What makes governments hesitate to pursue policies they ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mary O’Hara reviews Daniel Hatcher’s new book on the U.S.’ poverty industry which seeks to exploit public supports for private gain: (A) new book published last week by law professor and advocate Daniel L Hatcher, The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America’s Most Vulnerable Citizens, exposes a largely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon reminds us why even if we were to (pointlessly) prioritize raw GDP over fair distributions of income and wealth, inequality is bad for economic growth in general: The more we redistribute income and wealth, the more consumption increases, which then increases demand. In turn, this should ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Harry Leslie Smith writes about how an increasingly polarized city such as London excludes a large number of its citizens from meaningful social participation: (A)usterity has diminished the opportunity of the young and shortened the lives of the old. Even libraries – the life blood of any ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon highlights why we need governments at all levels to be working on stimulating Canada’s economy, not looking to cut back: The bank was referring to what economists call “secular stagnation”: a long-period of very low growth, with all its obvious consequences on unemployment and income inequality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon explains how higher taxes on the wealthy can be no less a boon for the economy than for the goal of social equality: In fact, empirical analysis shows that while the relationship between higher taxes and economic growth is complex, there is no proof that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Carol Goar rightly criticizes Stephen Harper’s plan to deal with an apparent recession by making Canada’s economy even worse off through yet more cuts. Andrew Jackson writes that denying or ignoring an economic downturn won’t make it go away, while Louis-Philippe Rochon traces its origins to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Michel Husson and Stephanie Treillet write that reduced work hours could do wonders for the quality of life for both workers who currently have jobs, and those seeking them: The question is not so much if working hours will decrease, but how. The reduction can be general, with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Janelle Vandergrift reminds us that we should see ourselves as participating citizens, not mere taxpayers: Taxes are a way to pool our resources and develop common infrastructure that can have a positive impact on us all. They build our roads and bridges, pay for our police and firefighters, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andrew Nikiforuk offers his suggestions as to how Rachel Notley can improve Alberta’s economy and political scene in her first term in office. And thwap comments on the right’s more hysterical responses to Notley’s victory. – Meanwhile, Duncan Cameron writes that Albertans have joined the rest of Canada ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon reviews the Cons’ track record as irresponsible economic and financial managers. Statistics Canada looks at the debt picture facing Canadians and finds young workers and families in particular fighting against increasing debt loads. And Forum finds that no matter how many hangers-on trumpet the theme of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jay Baron Nicorvo discusses how the myth of U.S. meritocracy serves largely as a means of funneling profits toward the 1%. And Mary Hansen points out one way of fighting back against evolving forms of corporate power – being the development of new, cooperative alternatives to businesses designed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Tessa Jowell writes that we need to treat inequality as a disease which can be cured through effective public policy, but the Star points out that the Cons have instead gone out of their way to make it worse. Fair Vote Canada interviews J. Peter Venton about ...