Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Alison Crawford reports on the Libs’ failure to pass any new legislation to allow collective bargaining for RCMP members – leaving them with even less than the system which was already found to be unconstitutional. And Jake Johnson discusses the consequences of the U.S. corporate sector’s war ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Tom Parkin points out that the Trudeau Liberals are falling far short of their promises to fund infrastructure even while tripling their planned deficit. – Jared Bernstein highlights how top-down block grants coupled with a denial of any responsibility for outcomes can lead to the deterioration of social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Carol Goar summarizes the Institute for Research on Public Policy’s review of the steps needed to rein in inequality in the long term, while pointing out the one factor which will determine whether anything gets done: At first glance, it looks intimidating. But on closer examination, it is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Katie Hyslop contrasts Canada’s longstanding recognition that housing is a human right against the gross lack of policy action to ensure its availability: Canada has signed and ratified the 1976 United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and in Article 11 it does recognize ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Casselman and Andrew Flowers discuss Raj Chetty’s research on the U.S.’ glaring lack of social mobility and fair opportunities: Children from poor families are much less likely to work in adulthood than children from middle-class families. Only about 60 percent of children from the poorest families are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David MacDonald offers some alternative suggestions that can do far more to reduce inequality and boost Canada’s economy than the Libs’ upper-class tax shuffle. And Karl Nerenberg reminds us that the most important scandal on our political scene is the constant stream of corporate tax giveaways which ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jim Stanford highlights how the Cons are focused on exactly the wrong priority in pushing for cuts at a time when Canada’s economy is in dire need of a jump-start: In the grand economic scheme, a deficit incurred as the economy slows is neither surprising nor undesirable.  ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jim Stanford discusses the need to inoculate citizens against shock doctrine politics, as well as the contribution he’s hoping to make as the second edition of Economics for Everyone is released: I suppose it is fitting (if tragic) that this new edition is being released into an economic ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Harvey Kaye discusses how the rich’s class warfare against everybody else has warped the U.S. politically and economically. And PressProgress observes that the Cons’ reactionary politics have produced miserable results for Canadian workers. – Which isn’t to say the Cons plan to learn any lessons anytime soon, ...