Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Yves Engler discusses how Justin Trudeau is now the face of the exploitation of poor countries and workers by the Canadian mining industry. And Penny Collenette writes that governments and business should both bear responsibility for human rights – though it’s worth being skeptical of her use ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sarah Anderson studies how corporate tax cuts enrich CEOs, but don’t do anything to help workers. And she then follows up with this op-ed: If claims about the job-creation benefits of lower tax rates had any validity, these 92 consistently profitable firms would be among the nation’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Charles Mathewes and Evan Sandsmark write that it’s long past time to start treating the excessive accumulation of wealth as something to be questioned – rather than accepted as an inevitability, or worse yet admired: The idea that wealth is morally perilous has an impressive philosophical and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sarah O’Connor examines the inconsistent relationship between job quantity and quality as another example of how it’s misleading to think of policy choices solely in terms of the number of jobs generated. Angela Monaghan discusses how wages continue to stagnate in the UK despite a low unemployment ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Larry Beinhart argues that aside from the gross unfairness and economic harm from growing inequality, there’s a basic problem trusting the uber-rich to make reasonable decisions with massive amounts of wealth. And George Monbiot makes the case that even as he pretends to be an outsider, Donald ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – George Monbiot discusses the importance of recognizing our social connections in making our political choices, rather than treating the world as merely a collection of unconnected individuals: It is not hard to see what the evolutionary reasons for social pain might be. Survival among social mammals is greatly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Tim Harford discusses how insurance and other industries are built on exploiting people who are risk-averse due to the inability to absorb substantial costs as “money pumps” for those who have more than they need: (L)et’s step back and ask ourselves what insurance is for. Classical economics has ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, examining how Chris Hamby’s brilliant reports on the effect of investor-state dispute settlement terms in past trade agreements should inform our choices in discussing new ones. For further reading…– Haley Edwards offers another worthwhile look at the effects of ISDS provisions.  – Marc Montgomery reports on the reasons to doubt a Comprehensive Economic Trade ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

The Canadian Progressive: TPP undermines public health systems, delivers unjustified benefits to foreign investors: study

A new study says the expanded rights granted to foreign investors in the Trans-Pacific Partnership delivers unjustified benefits to foreign investors while posing major risks for ordinary populations of TPP countries. The post TPP undermines public health systems, delivers unjustified benefits to foreign investors: study appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: New Council of Canadians video seeks to spark public debate on CETA [VIDEO]

A new video from the Council of Canadians seeks to start an enlightened public conversation on the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, or CETA. The post New Council of Canadians video seeks to spark public debate on CETA [VIDEO] appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Canadian think-tank wants to demystify the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives just launched a new series of reports seeking to “demystify” the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) as Canada inches closer to ratifying the controversial trade deal. The post Canadian think-tank wants to demystify the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Michal Rozworski: The media love the TPP, but should you?

My piece on the mainstream media’s trade deal boosterism was published at Ricochet yesterday. Canada’s media have heaped fawning praise on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the biggest free trade and investment deal in years. Rather than raising questions and red flags over a secret deal with mixed impacts, our media has been cheering and patting elites on ...

The Canadian Progressive: Progressive voters favour independent assessment of Harper’s CETA trade deal: Poll

A new poll commissioned by the Council of Canadians reveals that progressive voters favour an independent assessment Harper’s controversial Canada-Europe Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). The post Progressive voters favour independent assessment of Harper’s CETA trade deal: Poll appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.