The Canadian Progressive: Art for innovation’s sake? Lessons from our Canadian cousin

The Liberal government of Justin Trudeau is making significant investments in the Canadian public broadcasting, the arts and creative industries. A lesson for other countries on “how to tap into the creative capital of a society.” The post Art for innovation’s sake? Lessons from our Canadian cousin appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: TECHNOLOGY AND THE ELDERLY: A NEW ERA

A Wonderful Guest Post by Ron Burg of alreadyhomecare.com.  Check out these new tech products for seniors and caregivers. Thank you, Ron! As your parents and loved ones age, younger generations in the family are often left worried about the care and well-being of their elderly. Forcing your parent to pack his/her bags and enter ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: The smallest details tell the biggest story #nlpoli

Last week, provincial fisheries minister Vaughn Granter held a news conference at a local restaurant known for its seafood dishes to announce that from now on, that restaurant and even ordinary consumers could buy fish.directly from a fisherman without facing any legal problems. That may sound a bit odd to some people but truth be ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Walkom discusses how Canadian workers are feeling the pain of decades of policy designed to suppress wages – and notes there’s plenty more all parties should be doing to change that reality. And Doug Saunders points out what we should want our next federal government to pursue ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – John Thornhill talks to Mariana Mazzucato about the importance of public investment in fostering economic growth – along with the need for the public to benefit as a result: As Mazzucato explains it, the traditional way of framing the debate about wealth creation is to picture the ...

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: The White House Conference on Aging – How Technology Will Shape Our Future

Guest Post by Maria Ramos In 2011, the first baby boomers turned 65. Every day since then, thousands more reach retirement age. By 2050, 42% of American households will include someone over the age of 70. The recent once-every-ten-years White House Conference on Aging took place on July 13th and could not have come at ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – James Meek writes about the UK’s privatization scam, and how it’s resulted in citizens paying far more for the basic services which are better provided by a government which actually has the public interest within its mandate: Privatisation failed to demonstrate the case made by the privatisers that ...

Bill Longstaff: Bravo to Elon Musk, patent-buster

Inventor/entrepreneur/engineer/investor Elon Musk recently announced he was giving away all the patents on Tesla Motor’s electric car technology, allowing anyone, competitors included, to use them. Musk, CEO and product architect for the company (for which he receives a salary of a dollar a year), made the announcement last week, commenting, “We believe that Tesla, other ...

The Scott Ross: Public Education Before Health Care

When you replace the fan belt on your 1988 Toyota Corrolla, you can’t drive faster than when the car was brand new. Even with the new part, the car, with all of its wear and tear, is likely to be slower than when you first drove it off the lot. No one expects that a ...

The Scott Ross: Public Education Before Health Care

When you replace the fan belt on your 1988 Toyota Corrolla, you can’t drive faster than when the car was brand new. Even with the new part, the car, with all of its wear and tear, is likely to be slower than when you first drove it off the lot. No one expects that a ...

The Scott Ross: Public Education Before Health Care

When you replace the fan belt on your 1988 Toyota Corrolla, you can’t drive faster than when the car was brand new. Even with the new part, the car, with all of its wear and tear, is likely to be slower than when you first drove it off the lot. No one expects that a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Edward Robinson laments the willingness of European centre-left parties to abandon any attempt to argue against austerity even when the evidence shows that’s the right position to take: Centre-left parties in Europe appear to have completely lost the argument for pragmatic fiscal policy, much in the way ...

Political Eh-conomy: The more things change… Amazon’s “anticipatory shipping” and the village square

Media outlets recently publicized Amazon’s patent for what it calls “anticipatory shipping.” The premise is as simple as it is creepy: Amazon will charge and ship items before customers have the chance to buy them themselves. In other words, Amazon knows what you want and is happy to spare you the trouble and effort of ...

Progressive Proselytizing: Tech on the Side: Apple’s tablet upgrade cycle problem

On this blog I like to cover the big issue facing our planet, issues dramatically affecting millions or billions of people: war, conflict, global warming, poverty, economics, rights and freedoms, etc. Okay, okay, sometimes I like to get bogged down in the personalities and gamesmanship of politics, but if I can I like to keep ...

Dead Wild Roses: Roads: Why Are They Still Asphalt?

We live in an age of innovation. Using the great scientific advances of previous generations and implementing them in new and creative ways is huge part of our progress. No longer burdened by what we can do (mostly), the question for most fields now is how we can do it better. Can we do it ...

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM - A Blog by Donna Thomson: Envisioning a Better Future for Caregivers

Arthur Kleinman understands families like mine.  I know he does, because he wrote this: The chronically ill often are like those trapped at a frontier, wandering confused in a poorly known border area, waiting desperately to return to their native land.  Chronicity for many is the dangerous crossing of the borders, the interminable waiting to ...

The Scott Ross: Canada’s Innovation Is Patent-ly Declining

Starting in 1902, Albert Einstein spent seven years as a Swiss patent clerk, not only did it pay well but his “cobbler’s trade” as he referred to it, gave him ample time to do his scientific work. With less and less patents being applied for in Canada, Einstein gives hope, albeit slim to Canada’s dismal ...

350 or bust: Inspiring Action

It’s TED Talk Tuesday on 350orbust, and it’s time to get inspired. This week it’s Simon Senek on how great leaders inspire action:

Law is Cool: The Innovative Advocate: Canada’s Legal Future

The way legal services are delivered in Canada is changing.  Increased competition and a demand for lower prices has pressured law firms to slow hiring and deliver their services more efficiently.  After finishing my first year at Queen’s Law I started thinking about how law students can help firms meet the demand.  It starts with an open-eyes look at ...

Canadian Progressive: What’s Wrong With TPP?: Prominent Academics Respond

Prominent Academics Respond to the TPP (via EFF)   We asked several academics to let us know their thoughts about the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). The TPP is a secretive, multi-national trade agreement that threatens to extend restrictive intellectual property (IP) laws across the globe and rewrite international rules on its enforcement… RELATED: The Canadian Progressive ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: A Big Tell on Muskrat Falls Exports #nlpoli

A meeting of the Eastern Canadian premiers and all the New England Governors and the provincial government here sends Keith Hutchings. Who? The minister in charge of the innovation and business department. Nice enough fellow, but not exactly a superstar in the cabinet. But just notice:  the meeting is supposed to be about green energy ...

350 or bust: TED Talk Thursday: How To Set Goals…For The World

Jamie Drummond co-founded the advocacy organization ONE (Bono is another co-founder), which is focused on ending extreme poverty and the AIDS epidemic. In this inspiring June 2012 TED Talk, Mr. Drummond discusses the UN Millennium Development Goals: In 2000, the UN laid out 8 goals to make the world better by reducing poverty and disease ...

eaves.ca: Real Estate as Platform: Canadian Real Estate Industry looking for developers

As some readers know, I’ve been asked from time to time by members of the real estate industry to comment on the future of their industry, how technology might impact it and how open data (both the government variety, and the trend by regulators to make the industry’s data more open) may alter it. It ...

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM - A Blog by Donna Thomson: Austerity and Innovation – Reinventing Society

Over the last week, I have been busy – let me bring you up to date.  Last Wednesday, May 2, I tuned in to a podcast of the MARS lecture on “Austerity and Innovation” given by Geoff Mulgan who is the Chief Exec of the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA) in ...

openalex: Experimental Cities

[Below is a post that I just wrote for sustainablecitiescanada.ca. I’ve been thinking about this idea that cities can function as laboratories for developing policies for a while now. It’s an interesting alternative or complement to more traditional top-down approaches to planning. But beyond novelty, I think if used well it has the possibility to  ...