Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Branko Milanovic examines whether the U.S.’ tax system is actually progressive all the way to the top of the income spectrum – and finds that there’s not enough data about the treatment of the extremely wealthy to be sure. And Robert Cribb and Marco Chown Oved discuss ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Wells argues that climate change and First Nations reconciliation – two of the issues which the Libs have tried to turn into signature priorities – look set to turn into areas of weakness as Justin Trudeau continues his party’s tradition of dithering. And Martin Lukacs writes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Arthur Neslen points out how new trade agreements figure to make it impossible for governments to meet their environmental commitments. And Corporate Europe Observatory highlights how the CETA will give investors the ability to dictate public policy. – The Economist discusses the effect of high executive compensation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michael Harris argues that it’s long past time for the Trudeau Libs to start living up to their oft-repeated promise of real change – rather than merely slapping a friendlier face on the same old regressive Con policies. – Tom Parkin notes that Canada’s working class has been ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses how the rise of right-wing, prejudiced populism can be traced to the failures of global corporate governance. And Dani Rodrik argues that it’s time to develop an international political system to facilitate – rather than overriding – democratic action: Some simple principles would reorient ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how entrenched inequality and unearned income hurt the economy for everybody: We used to think of there being a trade-off: we could achieve more equality, but only at the expense of overall economic performance. It is now clear that, given the extremes of inequality being ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Henning Meyer interviews Tony Atkinson about the readily-available options to combat inequality – with the first step being to make sure people actually have a voice in the decisions which define how wealth and power are allocated: So, if you dive into the potential solutions you seem to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Graham Lowe and Frank Graves examine the state of Canada’s labour market, and find a strong desire among workers for an activist government to ensure improved pay equality and social supports. Oxfam reaches similar conclusions in studying workers and employers in Scotland. And Emma Teitel reports on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Bill Moyers writes about the conflict between the wealthy few seeking to preserve their privilege, and the balance of society seeking fairness for everybody: I keep in my files a warning published in [The Economist] a dozen years ago, on the eve of George W. Bush’s second ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Christopher Ingraham points out that while many luxuries are getting cheaper with time, the necessities of life are becoming much more difficult to afford: Many manufactured goods — like TVs and appliances — come from overseas, where labor costs are cheaper. “International, global competition lowers prices directly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Don Pittis writes that it will take far more than words and sentiments to reverse the trend of growing income inequality. Elaine Power points out that Ontario’s social assistance programs – like those elsewhere – far fall short of meeting basic human needs. And Christopher Mackie reminds us ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the connection between unionization and secure employment income – and the importance of encouraging the former if people otherwise face no real hope of achieving the latter. For further reading…– Again, Jake Rosenfeld, Patrick Denice and Jennifer Laird’s Economic Policy Institute study showing how unionization boosts non-union pay is here.– The Canadian Payroll ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Labour Day reading. – Jared Bernstein comments on the prospect of a labour revival which can boost the prospects of unionized and non-unionized workers alike. And Thomas Walkom makes the case for closer identification between the NDP and Canada’s labour movement: Labour needs a political party because unions, on their own, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Saqib Bhatti and Stephen Lerner point out that the struggle for power between labour and capital is far from over, and that the next step may be to engage on wider questions of economic control: For too long most unions defined their mission narrowly as winning higher ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors

Over at the Behind the Numbers web site, Allan Moscovitch, David Macdonald and I have a blog post titled “Ten Things to Know About Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors in Canada.” The blog post argues—among other things—that if the age of eligibility for Old Age Security were to move from 65 to 67, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands. – Sean McElwee highlights still more research showing that right-wing government tends to fail even on its own terms, with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands. – Sean McElwee highlights still more research showing that right-wing government tends to fail even on its own terms, with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Paolo Giuliano and Antonio Spilimbergo study (PDF) how the economic conditions an individual’s youth influence enduring values – and find that the experience of an economic shock tends to lead to a greater appreciation of a fair redistribution of resources: Consistent with theories of social psychology, this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – PressProgress points out that a large number of Canadians are justifiably concerned about our economy, with a particular desire to rein in income and wealth inequality. And Guy Caron notes that there’s no reason for politicians to keep facilitating tax avoidance which exacerbates the gap between the lucky ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Jackson makes the case for a review of Canada’s tax system focused on boosting revenue from the wealthy people and corporations who can readily afford it: These tax loopholes are costly. Partial inclusion of capital gains in taxable income costs the federal government alone $3.6 billion ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Paul Krugman rightly points out that it’s to be expected that Republican establishment figures would line up behind Donald Trump since he shares their top priority of handing still more money to the richest few. And Emine Saner highlights how strong inheritance taxes would help connect children of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – William G. Gale, Hilary Gelfond and Aaron Krupkin examine the evidence as to the effects of upper-class tax cuts, and find that they serve no purpose but to concentrate wealth and power in the hands of those who already have the most: [Donald Trump’s economic] plan won’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Thomas Walkom discusses Mel Hurtig’s philosophy of economic nationalism, while noting that Canada stands out as an exception in lacking a strong movement toward greater internal planning and economic control. And Maude Barlow looks back at Hurtig’s work, while Melissa Fundira reports that the Libs are trying ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Michael Wasser comments on the importance of unions – and the need to ensure that corporate-dominated politics don’t stand in the way of worker organization. And Ben Sichel rightly argues that Ontario’s widespread violations of employment standards demonstrate the need for unions to protect workers’ rights even ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Melisa Foster points out why millennials should be strongly interested in a national pharmacare program: Today, young Canadians are searching for jobs in an economy with high levels of precarious employment, unemployment or underemployment. According to a recent Statistics Canada labour force survey, approximately 39% of workers 15 ...