Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lars Osberg discusses the positive effects of raising taxes on Canada’s wealthiest few. And Avram Denburg argues for a speedy end to income splitting due to both its unfairness,and its impact on the public revenue needed to fund a healthier society: (I)ncome splitting primarily benefits middle- and upper-income ...

Progressive Proselytizing: Justin Trudeau’s tax plan is good policy and great politics

Going as far back as Justin Trudeau’s leadership election, he has consistently kept his major campaign planks close to the vest. Little tidbits, like the policy on marijuana, come out in carefully crafted morsels, but for the most part we are left guessing at what his first federal election campaign platform will be based on ...

Progressive Proselytizing: Justin Trudeau’s tax plan is good policy and great politics

Going as far back as Justin Trudeau’s leadership election, he has consistently kept his major campaign planks close to the vest. Little tidbits, like the policy on marijuana, come out in carefully crafted morsels, but for the most part we are left guessing at what his first federal election campaign platform will be based on ...

Progressive Proselytizing: Justin Trudeau’s tax plan is good policy and great politics

Going as far back as Justin Trudeau’s leadership election, he has consistently kept his major campaign planks close to the vest. Little tidbits, like the policy on marijuana, come out in carefully crafted morsels, but for the most part we are left guessing at what his first federal election campaign platform will be based on ...

Accidental Deliberations: The definition of privilege

Connor Kilpatrick is right to observe that while we should be willing to take note of privilege in many forms, we should be especially concerned with organizing to counter the grossly outsized influence of the very few at the top whose whims are typically allowed to override the common good. But there’s a handy dividing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michael Babad writes that we should be glad to see jobs being created in the public sector since the private sector is doing nothing to offer opportunities for Canadians. And Andrew Jackson discusses how Quebec’s progressive economic model has served it well, while offering an example which other ...

The Disaffected Lib: Yeah, But in Harper’s Eyes, They’re the Canadians That Matter.

Another zinger from the parliamentary budget officer.  The PBO is confirming what other critics have been saying for a long time – Harper’s income splitting initiative will benefit just one in six families and they’re already the well off. “The FTC [family tax credit] benefits about two million households, or 15 per cent of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Harvey Kaye discusses how the rich’s class warfare against everybody else has warped the U.S. politically and economically. And PressProgress observes that the Cons’ reactionary politics have produced miserable results for Canadian workers. – Which isn’t to say the Cons plan to learn any lessons anytime soon, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Kendra Coulter discusses the connection between human treatment of animals and humans: Close to home and around the world, working class and poor people are really struggling. In countries like Canada, unemployment and underemployment persist. We have been told that corporate tax cuts would create jobs, yet many ...

Eh Types: Splitting Our Differences

Imagine your kid’s school has 100 kids. It’s a good school, and all the parents pay for a lunch program so everyone gets a sandwich. Economically, it’s in a fairly diverse neighborhood so the school charges the parents for the lunch program in proportion to their income. Sounds good right? Everyone pays relative to what ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Tasini at Daily Kos discusses the Institute on Taxation & Economic Policy’s finding that every single U.S. state has a regressive tax structure in the taxes imposed at the state and local level. And John Cassidy examines the Center for American Progress’ proposals for more inclusive prosperity: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Scott Sinclair studies the effect of NAFTA on government policies, and finds that it’s been used primarily (and all too frequently) to attack Canadian policy choices: A study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) finds over 70% of all NAFTA investor-state claims since ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Robert Ferdman reports on a Pew Research poll showing that wealthier Americans are downright resentful toward the poor – and think the people with the most difficult lives actually have it too easy: (T)he prevalence of the view might reflect an inability to understand the plight of ...

Scott's DiaTribes: Pre-emptive pre-writ Liberal strike – radio style.

This got released yesterday on the radio. A nice little ad on the radio explaining why the Liberal Party is opposed to income splitting. Personally, I’m pleased to see we’re starting to fight fire with fire vis-a-vis the pre-writ campaign ads that the Conservatives have mastered in their attacking Stephane Dion and Michael Ignatieff (and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood discusses the close connection between the energy sector and inequality in Canada – with the obvious implication that policies dedicated to unduly favouring the former will inevitably produce the latter:  (T)he real story from last week’s Stats Can report isn’t that Canada is turning the tide ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Ed Broadbent laments Canada’s failure to meet its commitment to end child poverty – and notes that the Harper Cons in particular are headed in exactly the wrong direction: This child poverty rate is a national disgrace. It jumped from 15.8 per cent in 1989 to 19.2 per ...

Alberta Diary: Tory income-splitting tax policy: It’s about creating and preserving gender inequality and making rich guys richer

Whew! This income splitting is a killer. Actual perfect families as seen by the Harper Government may not appear exactly like Canadian reality. Below: Queen’s University tax law professor Kathleen Lahey. A fundamental purpose the Harper Government’s ideologically driven income-splitting tax scheme is to undermine women’s equality, Queen’s University tax law professor Kathleen Lahey told ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Tom Sullivan’s advice for Democrats south of the border that it’s essential to reach out to dispossessed voters of all types of backgrounds with a compelling alternative to the status quo is equally relevant to progressives in Canada. – But the good news is that here, somebody’s actually ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – The Economist discusses how a tiny elite group is taking a startling share of the U.S.’ total wealth: The ratio of household wealth to national income has risen back toward the level of the 1920s, but the share in the hands of middle-class families has tumbled (see ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jonas Fossli Gherso discusses the unfortunate (and unnecessary) acceptance of burgeoning inequality even by the people who suffer most from its presence. And Ryan Meili interviews Gabor Mate about the ill health effects of an economic system designed to keep people under stress: (T)he very nature of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Paul Krugman discusses the U.S.’ multi-decade pattern of income stagnation. David MacDonald and Kayle Hatt study the price we’ve paid to suit the Cons’ political purposes, while Kristin Rushowy reports on two new calls for a genuine child care system. And Andrew Jackson notes that the Cons’ ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Shannon Gormley points out that human rights are meaningless in the face of a government which claims the entitlement to strip people of their humanity – which is exactly what the Cons are setting out to do: (W)hen Canada’s Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander announced this ...

Northern Reflections: They Claim He’s a Smart Man

                                                              http://dyn.com/ The Conservative “Family Tax Cut”  is straight out of the fifties. Linda McQuaig considers three families, each earning a total $100,000 in income: ...

Northern Reflections: What’s New?

                                                       http://lawofwork.ca/               As the details of Stephen Harper’s income splitting plan are made public, it becomes clear how grotesque his “family friendly” policy is. Carol Goar writes that a small minority of Canadians will give income splitting enthusiastic support: For about 15 per cent of the population, the answer is an enthusiastic yes. These taxpayers ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich discusses the right’s utter lack of – and aversion to – empathy as either a personal or political value. Bob Norman reports on a particularly galling example of that phenomenon, as Fort Lauderdale has begun arresting people for feeding the homeless. And CBC reports on one ...