The Canadian Progressive: Halloween costume ideas for Canadian digital rights activists

You’re a digital rights activists and are struggling to pick the right Halloween costume? Dave Maass, an investigative researcher with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, suggests facial recognition paint, stingrays, privacy badger, patent troll, and certbot. A Guy Fawkes mask would do too. The post Halloween costume ideas for Canadian digital rights activists appeared first on ...

wmtc: what i’m reading: the underground railroad by colson whitehead

Colson Whitehead is a literary genius. In The Underground Railroad, he has found a way to tell the story of 400-plus years of African-American oppression without delivering an awkward march through history, and without using characters as billboards for ideas. Instead of linear time, Whitehead employs a geography of time: different eras, different historical moments, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Scott Sinclair and Stuart Trew applaud Wallonia’s principled stance against the CETA. And Joseph Stiglitz discusses the need to set up social and economic systems which actually serve the public good, rather than favouring corporate interests: Where the trade agreements failed, it was not because the US was ...

Dented Blue Mercedes: Free speech, and the cruel shackles of empathy and mutual respect

In Canada, we tend to value freedom of speech very highly, and it’s often said that the best way to counter objectionable speech is with more speech. That’s the first thought that crosses my mind in the case of U of T professor Jordan Peterson, who declares in a series of YouTube videos that he ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones highlights the toxic stress and other health problems borne disproportionately by members of the LGBT community who face systematic discrimination. And Tayla Smith and Jaitra Sathyandran discuss how temporary foreign workers (and others facing precarious work situations) tend to suffer preventable harm to their health ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada, a welcoming country? The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking

The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking tarnishes Canada’s image as a compassionate and welcoming country. Temporary foreign worker programmes allow employers to violate migrant workers’ rights. The post Canada, a welcoming country? The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada

David Suzuki on the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada, and the “hard work and leadership of Indigenous women and communities who have spent decades calling for an inquiry.” The post David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Canadian Dimension: Water isn’t a human right in Canada, but it should be

Photo by Daniel Zimmermann In recent months, there has been a brewing controversy over the use, ownership, and commodification of important natural resources like fresh and clean drinking water. And rightfully so, because while Canada has high amounts of fresh water in global terms, the reality of water insecurity is apparent even here, especially as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Christopher Ingraham points out that while many luxuries are getting cheaper with time, the necessities of life are becoming much more difficult to afford: Many manufactured goods — like TVs and appliances — come from overseas, where labor costs are cheaper. “International, global competition lowers prices directly ...

centre of the universe: Freedom’s Just Another Word

Over the past couple of weeks, you’ve been either lauding or vilifying this guy who plays sportsball in the US because he opted to sit out the national anthem in protest of racism, race-based violence, and inequity. You got *really mad* at him, and said he shouldn’t be allowed to play anymore. You said he…

centre of the universe: Bikini, Burkini – Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off

– initially entered as a series of ranty comments on an effbook post – I don’t care WHAT your religion is, or isn’t – no government has the right to tell anybody how to dress. So the government of France doesn’t have any more right to tell people what they can wear at the beach…

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – James Stewart examines how Donald Trump could be paying zero taxes using shelters designed specifically to enrich real estate developers while serving no social purpose. And Alexandra Thornton and Brendan Duke point out the “pass-through” loophole being exploited more and more by U.S. corporations. – Daniel Tencer ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Thomas Walkom writes that with both major U.S. presidential candidates taking an understandably skeptical view of free-trade agreements in their current form, Canada shouldn’t be planning on the past trade model continuing to spread. – Ben Guarino discusses how climate change is leading to the spread of toxic ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Stephen Hawking discusses the crucial distinction between seeing money as a means of pursuing worthy ends versus treating it a goal in and of itself – and notes that we should be wary of political choices based on the latter view: Money is also important because it is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Bjarke Skærlund Risager interviews David Harvey about the history and effect of neoliberalism: I’ve always treated neoliberalism as a political project carried out by the corporate capitalist class as they felt intensely threatened both politically and economically towards the end of the 1960s into the 1970s. They desperately ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Dayen highlights the treatment of workers as the most fundamental difference between Scandinavian countries which have achieved both prosperity and social justice, and the U.S. and others which have sacrificed the latter for false promises of the former: But societies make choices at a more elemental ...

Canadian Dimension: PEN Canada Surveillance Survey is Now Live

Photo by steve p2008 Contribute to PEN Canada’s study on the impact of surveillance on writers here. How does surveillance impact your work? PEN Canada has joined Canadian Association of Journalists (CAJ) and Ryerson University’s Centre for Free Expression (CFE) in an effort to learn more about the effects of mass surveillance on Canadian writers. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jim Tankersley interviews Joshua Bivens about the relative effects of economic growth and income inequality – and particularly his evidence showing that more people are far better off with more modest growth fairly distributed than with greater nominal growth concentrated at the top: Tankersley: How do we know ...

wmtc: the greatest, forever. rest in power muhammad ali.

Revolutionary thought of the day, from a revolutionary American. Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go ten thousand miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights? No, I am not ...

Montreal Simon: Now We Know Why the Liberals Don’t Want to Scrap the Saudi Deal

Well it's taken a while, but now we know why the Liberal government is so reluctant to scrap the deal to sell armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia.Not just because it would cost thousands of jobs, in an area of Canada which has been ravaged by the collapse of our manufacturing industry.But also because there would be ...

The Canadian Progressive: Green Party of Canada asks CRA to revoke Jewish National Fund’s charity status

The Green Party of Canada is calling on the Canada Revenue Agency to revoke the charity status of the Jewish National Fund on the grounds that the organization discriminates against Palestinians and non-Jews in Israel. Also, Israel’s “failure to comply with international human rights law.” The post Green Party of Canada asks CRA to revoke ...

Montreal Simon: The Office of Religious Freedom is Finally Buried

Well it took a while, and as you can see the Cons weren't happy about it.But the Trudeau government has finally buried the so-called Office of Religious Freedom.Read more »

wmtc: rest in power, daniel berrigan and michael ratner

The world lost two great fighters for peace and justice this past week. Daniel Berrigan was a lifelong peace activist, a man who was ready and willing to put his body and soul on the line. He was a writer, a thinker, a pacifist, an idealist, a pragmatist, and a priest. Berrigan was also a ...

Alberta Politics: St. Albert Catholic school board has spent more than $367,000 to defend firing of transgender teacher

PHOTOS: Transgender teacher Jan Buterman (Metro Newspapers photo). Below: Duncan Kinney of Progress Alberta, the former Pope Benedict, and David Keohane, Superintendent of Greater St. Albert Catholic Schools. ST. ALBERT, Alberta The St. Albert Catholic school board has spent at least $367,188 of taxpayer money to keep a transgender former teacher named Jan Buterman from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Michael Klare writes about the future direction of the oil industry – which looks to involve cashing out quickly than building anything lasting: At the beginning of this century, many energy analysts were convinced that we were at the edge of the arrival of “peak oil”; a peak, ...