Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joseph Parilla examines how entrenched inequality serves as a barrier to economic development for everybody.  – Heather Long highlights how the U.S.’ last round of corporate tax cuts led to lower wages for all but the lucky few. And Stuart Bailey writes about the need for public policy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sam Gindin discusses the future of labour organizing in the course of reviewing Jane McAlevey’s No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Guilded Age: (W)e have been struggling with how to combine building the union with raising larger, more political questions. One modest element of this, especially but ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Harry Leslie Smith writes about how an increasingly polarized city such as London excludes a large number of its citizens from meaningful social participation: (A)usterity has diminished the opportunity of the young and shortened the lives of the old. Even libraries – the life blood of any ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Harry Leslie Smith writes about the problems with a U.K. budget and economic plan designed to avoid any moral compass: Nothing better illustrates to me that Osborne is sailing us back to the harsh and socially unsustainable cruelty of the 1930s than his removal of substantial benefits from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Joseph Stiglitz writes that inequality is killing the American middle class. And Crawford Kilian examines the direct connection between inequality and midlife mortality: For some white Americans born between 1961 and 1970, however, something has gone wrong. They grew up in what should have been a wonderful ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Friday reading. – Matthew Melmed examines how poverty early in life is both disturbingly widespread, and likely to severely affect a child’s future prospects. – Lawrence Mishel and Alyssa Davis track the extreme gap in wage growth for CEOs as opposed to workers. Robert Skidelsky argues that we can’t rely on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Sheila Block points out the problems with the spread of low-paying, precarious jobs. And PressProgress fact-checks the CFIB’s attempt to make as many workers’ lives as precarious as possible by suppressing minimum wages and standards. – But Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports that Ontario’s provincial government is making matters worse ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Sean Illing writes about the utterly misplaced view of the privileged few that they can or should be treated as immune from the environmental realities facing everybody: I see the decadence of the people in Rancho Santa Fe as a microcosm of America today, particularly corporate America. What ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Elias Isquith talks to David Madland about the connection between increasing inequality and the breakdown of trust in the U.S. political system. CBC and Larry Elliott follow up on the IMF’s findings about the economic damage done by income and wealth disparities. And Philip Longman thoroughly examines the ...

Montreal Simon: The Grubby Stephen Harper and Need For Change

One of the things I despise the most about Stephen Harper is that he would turn this big, beautiful country, into something as small and as grubby as he is.Turn a still young country like Canada into an old and tired one, where greed rules and change is viewed as threatening. Or as Carol Goar writes, ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canadian WW2 Veteran: “At 91, I am history, and I fear its repetition” [VIDEO]

Smith, 91, one of the last remaining Canadian World War 2 veterans, fears that unrestrained capitalism is killing collective rights and western democracy. The post Canadian WW2 Veteran: “At 91, I am history, and I fear its repetition” [VIDEO] appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.