Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Yves Engler discusses how Justin Trudeau is now the face of the exploitation of poor countries and workers by the Canadian mining industry. And Penny Collenette writes that governments and business should both bear responsibility for human rights – though it’s worth being skeptical of her use ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Matt Bruenig examines who is living in poverty in the U.S. – and how policy choices result in many people who can’t feasibly earn wages being stuck below the poverty line: (C)hildren, elderly, disabled people, and students make up around 70 percent of the poor. If you ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content for your Friday reading. – Aditya Chakrabortty writes about the devastating combination of an urgent need for collective action on the key issues we face, and a deeply-entrenched political aversion to anything of the sort. And Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett highlight how the UK Cons are going out of their way to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how entrenched inequality and unearned income hurt the economy for everybody: We used to think of there being a trade-off: we could achieve more equality, but only at the expense of overall economic performance. It is now clear that, given the extremes of inequality being ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic discusses how our current means of measuring inequality may leave out the most important part of the story in the form of wealth deliberately hidden from public view: (T)here are at least two problems. First, the rich especially, but everybody else as well, have a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones argues that public policy and social activism are needed to rein in the excesses of a corporate class which sees it as its job to extract every possible dollar from the society around it: A financial elite plunged the country into calamity and effectively got ...