Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Steve Burgess points out that we shouldn’t be the least bit surprise by the latest news of politically-connected billionaires managing to tilt the tax system in their favour. Ed Broadbent calls for a much-needed end to tax policy that favours the wealthy in efforts to avoid contributing to ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how beyond the scandals and failures we’ve seen to date, the Global Transportation Hub was always built on a dangerous desire to allow businesses to escape rules and democratic oversight. For further reading…– Geoff Leo reports here on Brightenview’s use of benefits for “rural” investors to try to fill a warehouse mall integrally ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Nathaniel Lewis and Matt Bruenig discuss the relationship between massive inheritances and ongoing wealth inequality. Nick Hanauer makes the case for much higher taxes on the wealthy as part of a plan for improved economic development, while a new Ipsos poll finds that three-quarters of Americans are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – George Monbiot examines the history of James McGill Buchanan, Charles Koch and others who have used massive amounts of time and money to ensure that wealth wins out over democracy in shaping U.S. policy – and how their influence will sounds familiar elsewhere as well: The papers Nancy ...

Accidental Deliberations: On sucker’s deals

While my Leader-Post column won’t be running this week, I’ll take the opportunity to offer some context and an update on Geoff Leo’s must-read report on Brightenview’s founders who have become the Wall government’s latest corporate darlings. By way of background, Leo was also the one to break the news about how the Saskatchewan Party’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman notes that after promising to bring some outside perspective to politics, Donald Trump is instead offering only a warmed-over version of the Republicans’ typical voodoo economics. And John Cassidy highlights how Trump’s plan appears to be nothing more than to wage class warfare on behalf of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Andrew Jackson discusses the problems with increased corporate concentration of wealth and power – including the need for a response that goes beyond competition policies. In the 1960s, institutional economists like John Kenneth Galbraith described a world of oligopoly in which a few firms, such as the big ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Brad Wall’s choice to cover up the truth behind the Saskatchewan Party’s Global Transportation Hub scandal – and the most plausible (if still inadequate) explanations for that decision. For further reading…– Again, the latest public revelation was Geoff Leo’s reporting of political pressure to pay inflated prices for land. And Leo also reported ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Simon Enoch explains why the Sask Party’s plans to inflict an austerian beating until economic morale improves is doomed to failure: It is now abundantly clear that the Saskatchewan government’s “transformational change” agenda is in reality a not-so-subtle euphemism for provincewide austerity in response to the current ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Claudia Chwalisz points out that in addition to relying on a distortionary electoral system, the Trudeau Libs’ majority was built on a bubble which now seems likely to pop. Michael Harris wagers that Canadians will remember the broken core promise when they go to the polls in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Rahul Kalvapalle reports on the latest Ipsos poll showing how younger Canadians expect to lead a worse life than the generations who went before them. – PressProgress examines how inequality has been burgeoning under Christy Clark’s B.C. Lib government. And Maimuna Majumder notes that the toxic effects of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Star argues that a crackdown on tax evasion and avoidance is a crucial first step in reining in inequality. Susan Delacourt wonders when, if ever, Chrystia Freeland’s apparent interest in inequality will show up in her role in government. And Vanmala Subramaniam reminds us why the cause ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Vanessa Williamson writes that plenty of Americans want to see wealthy individuals and corporations pay their fair share of taxes – only to have that strong desire ignored by policymakers. And Joseph Stiglitz and Erika Siu discuss the glaring need for stronger tax enforcement around the globe. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich discusses how our economy is rigged so that the self-proclaimed risk-takers actually can’t lose: I don’t want to pick on Ms. Mayer or the managers of the funds that invest in Yahoo. They’re typical of the no-lose system in which America’s corporate and financial elite now ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Don Pittis rightly notes that there can be a significant difference between an economy trumpeted as growing due to share prices and profits, and one which actually provides benefits to workers – and that the U.S. looks to be making some rare progress on the latter point. – ...