Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Casselman and Andrew Flowers discuss Raj Chetty’s research on the U.S.’ glaring lack of social mobility and fair opportunities: Children from poor families are much less likely to work in adulthood than children from middle-class families. Only about 60 percent of children from the poorest families are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson offers his prescription for Canada’s economy in the face of plunging oil prices and a sinking dollar. And Murray Dobbin argues that the Libs’ handling of trade agreements reflects a fundamental economic choice between a socially-oriented economic outlook which has worked in the past, and a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Simon Kennedy highlights another key finding in Oxfam’s latest study on wealth, as the global 1% now owns as much as the other 99% combined. And Dennis Howlett reviews Gabriel Zucman’s Hidden Wealth of Nations, while noting that like the works it seeks to update it may ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mariana Mazzucato comments on the need for the public sector to play a significant and direct role in sustainable economic development: The debate about the relative roles of the state and the market in capitalist economies tends to swing from side to side in the hearts and minds ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Kaylie Tiessen offers some important lessons from Ontario’s child poverty strategy – with the most important one being the importance of following through. And Christian Ledwell encourages Prince Edward Island’s MPs to lead a push toward a basic income, while PressProgress calls out the Fraser Institute for trying ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Thomas Walkom takes a broad look at the problems with the Trans-Pacific Partnership, while noting that the Trudeau Libs don’t seem inclined to address them at all. Deirdre Fulton sees the final text as being worse than anybody suspected based even on the previous leaked drafts. Doctors Without ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne surveys some of the glaring warning signs about the Trans-Pacific Partnership for anybody who thinks a government’s job is to further the interests of citizens rather than corporations: These deals are no longer about free trade. Rather, as I pointed out in my last column, ...

The Canadian Progressive: A Canadian Progressive’s Case Against Justin Trudeau Becoming Canada’s Next Prime Minister

Here are The Canadian Progressive’s ten arguments against Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau replacing Stephen Harper as Canada’s next prime minister: The post A Canadian Progressive’s Case Against Justin Trudeau Becoming Canada’s Next Prime Minister appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood highlights how the Trans-Pacific Partnership will do little but strengthen the hand of the corporate sector against citizens. Duncan Cameron notes that even in the face of a full-court press for ever more stringent corporate controls, there’s plenty of well-justified skepticism about the TPP. And ...

Accidental Deliberations: On uncosted liabilities

So even from the sketchy details made public so far, and even leaving aside the more general harm done by limiting government action and entrenching corporate monopolies, the Trans-Pacific Partnership will cost Canada: $4.3 billion in compensation to dairy, chicken and egg farmers Up to 20,000 lost jobs in the auto sector – meaning both ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Rosemary Barton discusses why it’s in Canada’s best interest on the global stage to work on building strong multilateral institutions (including the UN) rather than counting on bluster to make a difference. But Gus van Harten notes that we’re instead signing onto trade deals including the TPP ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – PressProgress highlights just a few of the Cons’ obviously-flawed claims about corporate tax rates. And Ethan Cox discusses why we should be talking about the CETA and TPP during the campaign both due to their own importance, and the potential to tap into public concerns.  – Martin Lukacs ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman theorizes that our recent pattern of economic instability can be traced to a glut of accumulated wealth chasing too few viable investments: On the surface, we seem to have had a remarkable run of bad luck. First there was the housing bust, and the banking crisis ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Michael Leachman debunks the claim that progressive tax rates on the rich cause any problems from an economic development standpoint. And Daisy Srblin argues for a strong and unapologetic movement toward a fairer tax system: It is now up to the left to provide an alternative. Let’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Chantal Panozzo discusses the lack of work-life balance which serves as the default in the U.S. – and notes how preposterous precarious work looks once a person has experienced an alternative: Before I moved to Switzerland for almost a decade, American Reality was all I knew. I was ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Christopher Majka reviews Henry Mintzberg’s Rebalancing Society as a noteworthy discussion of the need for balance between the public, private and “plural” sectors. And David Madland is pleased to see the U.S.’ Democrats finally fighting back against the view that the corporate sector is the only one ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – tcnorris highlights how the Cons’ gratuitous cuts are undermining their hopes of staying in power. And Eric Pineault discusses the costs of austerity for Quebec in particular and Canada as a whole: (C)utting into spending slows down growth and keeps the economy in a stagnation trap. The resulting ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we should be taking the crisis in Greece and other global instability as reasons to ensure Canada retains the authority to act in its own interest – rather than excuses for rendering ourselves just as helpless as Greece itself. For further reading… – Mark Blyth nicely documents the origins of the debt ...

Accidental Deliberations: On absolutism

Shorter John Ibbitson: The Very Serious People hereby demand that Thomas Mulcair give a definitive yes-or-no answer on all possible trade agreements before we even know what’s in them.

Accidental Deliberations: The definition of insanity

Shorter Joe Oliver: We’re fully prepared to blame any recession on Canada’s exposure to international instability. But as proof of our economic competence, we’re planning to spend billions in higher drug prices and transition costs to expose ourselves further.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jerry Dias sees the forced passage of an unamended Bill C-377 as a definitive answer in the negative to the question of whether the Senate will ever justify its own existence. And Nora Loreto emphasizes that the bill has no purpose other than to attack unions: The amendments ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mark Anderson reports on the Change Readiness Index’ findings that the growing concentration and inequality of wealth is making it more and more difficult for countries to deal with foreseeable disasters. But Jon Queally points out that a concerted effort to quit abusing fossil fuels could do ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jeff Spross argues that in addition to ensuring that employees are fairly paid for the overtime hours they work, we should also be pushing to ensure people aren’t required to work as much to begin with. And Angella MacEwen points out that any spin about increasing wages ...

Bill Longstaff: The Trans-Pacific Partnership—never heard of it ???!!!

The above headline is plagiarized directly from a CBC article. I added the punctuation gratuitously to convey my horror that a proposed “trade” agreement that could have major effects on Canadian lives is largely unknown to those same Canadians. The agreement is the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and it involves 12 Pacific Rim countries including Canada ...

Bill Longstaff: Obama stopped in his free trade tracks

Free trade agreements are frequently referred to by dissenters as corporate rights agreements, and as I pointed out in a recent post, there are powerful reasons why politicians negotiate them in favour of corporate interests. But regardless of who they are primarily intended to serve, the agreements contain articles which seriously affect the public good, ...