Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brian Nolan, Max Roser, and Stefan Thewissen study (PDF) the relationship between GDP and household income across the OECD, and find a nearly universal pattern of nominal economic growth which isn’t finding its way into households (which is particularly extreme in the U.S.). Roy van der Weide, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ed Finn reminds us that “free trade” agreements have always served to increase the wealth and power of those who already have the most at the expense of social interests. And Scott Sinclair and Angella MacEwen each offer their take on Parliament’s hearings into the Trans-Pacific Partnership. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Rafael Gomez and Juan Gomez offer a look at the state of Canadian workplace democracy, as well as some useful proposals to improve it. – The New York Times editorial board points out how the U.S.’ temporary worker programs are predictably being abused by employers to lower ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Senate’s recent attempts to claim any relevance to Canadian politics, and what they should tell us about the failures of our actual elected representatives. For further reading…– OpenParliament’s status report on Bill C-14 (featuring the votes from the House of Commons) is here. Catherine Tunney reported on the Senate’s debate on amendments ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Sunday reading. – David Korten writes that despite the trend of the past few decades, there’s nothing inevitable about international agreements inevitably favouring capital over citizens rather than the other way around. – Miles Corak examines Nicole Fortin’s research showing that concentrated income at the top of the spectrum is undermining ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rick Salutin argues that we need to say no to any more trade agreements designed to privilege corporations at the expense of the public. Will Martin reports on the IMF’s long-overdue recognition of the failures of neoliberalism, while pointing out that there’s still a long way to go ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Brent Patterson points out the continued dangers of extrajudicial challenges to laws under the CETA. And John Jacobs examines (PDF) the likelihood that reduced tariffs under the Trans-Pacific Partnership would mostly push Canada toward further dependence on resource extraction. – Ken Jacobs, Zohar Perla, Ian Perry and Dave ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Nick Dearden discusses how the latest wave of corporate power agreements – including the CETA – stands to undermine democracy in participating countries: Like the US deal, Ceta contains a new legal system, open only to foreign corporations and investors. Should the British government make a decision, say, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Eric Reguly highlights the growing possibility of a global revolt against corporate-centred trade agreements: (A) funny thing happened on the way to the free trade free-for-all: A lot of people were becoming less rich and more angry, to the point that globalization seems set to go into reverse. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Peter Mazereeuw reports on the growing opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership which may result in it never coming into force. And Jerry Dias reminds us why we should be glad if that movement wins out over the corporate forces who assembled it behind closed doors: (T)he far ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Neil MacDonald discusses the unfairness in allowing a wealthy class of individuals to set up its own rules, while Jeffrey Sachs notes that the U.S. and U.K. are among the worst offenders in allowing for systematic tax evasion. And Alex Hemingway rightly points out that the recognition ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Akin reports that MPs from multiple parties are rightly challenging offshore tax evasion – though it remains to be seen how many will actually demand a change to the practice. And Tanya Tagala notes that it won’t be long before the people named in the Panama ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Fred Dews highlights Alice Rivkin’s suggestions as to consensus policies which can reduce inequality while facilitating economic development. And Sheila Regehr looks at how a basic income can work in practice, while Monica Oss reminds us that investments in reducing poverty and inequality can often be recouped in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic discusses how our current means of measuring inequality may leave out the most important part of the story in the form of wealth deliberately hidden from public view: (T)here are at least two problems. First, the rich especially, but everybody else as well, have a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Angella MacEwen discusses how most of what’s sold as “free trade” serves mostly to hand power to the corporate sector at the expense of the public. Ashley Csanady and Monika Warzecha point out that the same is true for Ontario’s business subsidies and tax credits which are normally ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – In the wake of the Panama Papers, Don Pittis writes that tax shelters serve only to ensure that the wealthy don’t pay their fair share for a functional society – meaning that everybody who can’t afford to engage in financial shenanigans is left to pick up the slack. ...

Bill Longstaff: Why are we still discussing the TPP?

Has anybody actually read the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement? I presume the negotiators have. And no doubt a host of corporate lawyers. But have any of our politicians read it? Has International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland? All 6,000 densely-packed pages? I remember John Crosbie, when he was Minister of International Trade in the Mulroney government, ...

Bill Longstaff: Why are we still discussing the TPP?

Has anybody actually read the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement? I presume the negotiators have. And no doubt a host of corporate lawyers. But have any of our politicians read it? Has International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland? All 6,000 densely-packed pages? I remember John Crosbie, when he was Minister of International Trade in the Mulroney government, ...

Bill Longstaff: Why are we still discussing the TPP?

Has anybody actually read the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement? I presume the negotiators have. And no doubt a host of corporate lawyers. But have any of our politicians read it? Has International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland? All 6,000 densely-packed pages? I remember John Crosbie, when he was Minister of International Trade in the Mulroney government, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – James Ayre points out Radoslaw Stefanski’s study as to how cutting off fossil fuel subsidies subsidies (among other public policy preferences) would go a long way toward helping a transition toward clean, renewable energy. – Mike De Souza exposes the National Energy Board’s service to the oil industry, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Harry Leslie Smith writes about the problems with a U.K. budget and economic plan designed to avoid any moral compass: Nothing better illustrates to me that Osborne is sailing us back to the harsh and socially unsustainable cruelty of the 1930s than his removal of substantial benefits from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich points out how perpetually more severe corporate rights agreements are destroying the U.S.’ middle class. And Michael Geist concludes his must-read series by summarizing the dangers of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (and making the case against ratifying it). – Jeremy Runnalls writes about the growing movement toward ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jared Bernstein is hopeful that the era of expansive corporate rights agreements is coming to an end. Paul Krugman notes that there’s no evidence anybody has gained economically from the spread of those agreements other than the wealthy few pushing them through. And Stuart Trew has some suggestions ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Claire Provost writes that corporate trade agreements are designed to make it more difficult to pursue fair tax systems: Governments must be able to change their tax systems to ensure multinationals pay their fair share and to ensure that critical public services are well funded. States must also ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sally Goemer writes that extreme inequality is a cause of economic instability for everybody. And Tom Powdrill discusses the importance of organized labour in ensuring the fair sharing of income, while Steven Hill points out the harmful effects of precarious work. – Sheila Regehr and Roderick Benns ...