Things Are Good: Global Economy Becoming Efficient

Usually when economists talk about efficiencies they means firing people so executives can get better returns, this time efficiency is found by using electricity in smarter ways. The myth that increased energy consumption means a better economy has been “decoupled”. The global economy is using less energy for every dollar produced – a sign that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – France St-Hilaire, David Green and Craig Riddell offer some needed policy prescriptions to fight inequality in Canada: As first steps toward expanding the share of the economic pie going to workers, the minimum wage should be gradually increased to $15 and the Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB) significantly ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), questioning why so many of our political leaders spend so much time talking about pipelines which are neither economically necessary nor environmentally sustainable. For further reading…– J. David Hughes’ study cited in the column is here (PDF). And Bruce Cheadle reported on the federal government’s internal analysis showing that Canada’s current transport ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Mark Karlin interviews Richard Wolff about the relationship between unfettered capitalism and poverty: How is poverty an inevitable by-product of capitalism? Doesn’t this make all these charitable drives “to eliminate poverty” disingenuous because it cannot be eliminated in a capitalistic system? Poverty has always accompanied capitalism (as Thomas Piketty’s ...

Susan on the Soapbox: Brexit and Trump: It’s All Your Fault

Ms Soapbox was just getting her head around the fact that Donald Trump was her fault when they blamed her for Brexit. Wait, what? Political philosophers and journalists on both sides of the Atlantic point out that not everyone who supports Trump or voted “Leave” in the Brexit referendum is a xenophobic bigot; they may ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Danny Dorling writes about the importance of empathy and kindness in establishing the basis for a more equal society: When you cannot empathise with another group, it is very hard to think kindly towards them. It is when you feel “all in it together” or at least “there ...

The Canadian Progressive: G20 ignores global public’s call to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies

G20 energy ministers’ meeting in Beijing this week failed to come up with a deadline and concrete plans for eliminating fossil fuel subsidies. The meeting followed last month’s commitment by G7 leaders to phase out fossil fuel handouts by 2025. The post G20 ignores global public’s call to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies appeared first on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jeremy Smith argues that the Brexit vote result should serve as a compelling reminder of the dangers of neoliberalism. John Hood focuses on inequality in particular as a driving force behind the willingness of voters to leave the European Union, while Mike Carter points out the connection between ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Bogus Brokerage Bull, and Other Online Obstructions

“by keeping that purchase threshold at $20 instead of giving Canadian shoppers a break and raising it to $80, Ottawa spends about $166 million to collect $39 million in additional taxes and duties.” Here’s something the Industry Minister should fix this year. Especially in light of the Liberals’ support of the TPP, why are they ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Oxfam points out the latest World Wealth Report showing that extreme inequality and wealth continue to grow around the globe. And AFP reports on the IMF’s warnings that inequality and poverty represent significant dangers for the U.S. economy. – Kim Moody writes about the state of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Neil Irwin writes about the White House Council of Economic Advisers’ study of employment policy which found that superior protections for workers (rather than the undermining of employment standards in the name of “flexibility”) correlate to improved workforce participation. – MaxSpeak discusses the value of universal social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brian Nolan, Max Roser, and Stefan Thewissen study (PDF) the relationship between GDP and household income across the OECD, and find a nearly universal pattern of nominal economic growth which isn’t finding its way into households (which is particularly extreme in the U.S.). Roy van der Weide, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon reminds us why even if we were to (pointlessly) prioritize raw GDP over fair distributions of income and wealth, inequality is bad for economic growth in general: The more we redistribute income and wealth, the more consumption increases, which then increases demand. In turn, this should ...

The Canadian Progressive: Trade Agreements Should Prioritize People, Not Corporations

David Korten argues that the current wave of opposition to profit-oriented trade agreements will force future deals to prioritize people, not transnational corporations. The post Trade Agreements Should Prioritize People, Not Corporations appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Yvan Guillemette discusses the need for public-sector investment in economic development to make up for the massive amounts of private capital sitting idle. And Daniel Kahnemann challenges the theory that corporate decision-making is either rational or directed toward optimal outcomes: “You look at large organizations that are supposed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jim Tankersley interviews Joshua Bivens about the relative effects of economic growth and income inequality – and particularly his evidence showing that more people are far better off with more modest growth fairly distributed than with greater nominal growth concentrated at the top: Tankersley: How do we know ...

Dead Wild Roses: Uber in the US – Predatory (the usual) Capitalism

   Well here we go, another lesson on how exploiting the poor is the goto plan for making the big bucks in our society, only lets give it a snappy title – the new sharing economy.  Let’s look at how the new sharing economy looks a bunch like the old economy. “A livery driver for ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Stranded Assets, Saskatchewan Style

A report by a little known government entity says what I have been saying about pipelines stranding assets: Its overall conclusion, however, urges caution when it comes to long-term investments in pipelines and other oil and gas infrastructure. Such investments “could be at high risk of becoming economically unviable as prices in renewable electricity further ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Sunday reading. – David Korten writes that despite the trend of the past few decades, there’s nothing inevitable about international agreements inevitably favouring capital over citizens rather than the other way around. – Miles Corak examines Nicole Fortin’s research showing that concentrated income at the top of the spectrum is undermining ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Brent Patterson points out the continued dangers of extrajudicial challenges to laws under the CETA. And John Jacobs examines (PDF) the likelihood that reduced tariffs under the Trans-Pacific Partnership would mostly push Canada toward further dependence on resource extraction. – Ken Jacobs, Zohar Perla, Ian Perry and Dave ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Greg Jericho is the latest to weigh in on the false promises of neoliberalism: An article in the IMF’s latest issue of is journal Finance and Development notes that “instead of delivering growth, some neoliberal policies have increased inequality” and jeopardised “durable” growth. The authors note that ...

Things Are Good: Canadian Government Think Tank: Renewables Win Over Fossil Fuels

When the Conservatives were in charge of Canada they didn’t conserve at all, instead they rallied behind fossil fuels to power Canada’s economy. That foolish gamble contributed to a lame economy (sent the country into massive debt) and a dying planet (even sabotaging global discussions about carbon and fossil fuel. Canadians are hopeful that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrea Germanos follows up on the IMF’s realization that handing free money and power to corporations does nothing for the economy as it affects people’s lives. And Susie Cagle examines the role of tech money – like other massive accumulations of wealth – in exacerbating inequalities in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Murray Dobbin is hopeful that we may be seeing corporate globalization based on unquestioned neoliberal ideology come to an end: There is no definitive way to identify when an ideology begins to lose its grip on the public discourse but could this clear resistance (it is even more ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Media Captivated By Chicken Flap Gibberish

BREAKING: Residents are terrified as their beloved #KFCBuffet comes under threat. Premier steps in to help people #SkipTheDishes. .@CTVCally @ctvregina Fear of loss of chicken buffet is unbecoming of a news organization. #KFCBuffet #Hype — Saskboy (@saskboy) May 25, 2016 STANDING UP FOR SASKATCHEWAN Buffets My government believes in a strong Saskatchewan within a smorg ...