Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: STC Bus Service Couldn’t Survive the SaskParty

This news makes me so mad and disappointed. The future of Saskatchewan got a little more bleak today. “What are the core services that people expect from government – and it is not necessarily a bus company,” Finance Minister Kevin Doherty said Wednesday. “As for the short window of time before service ends, the province ...

Susan on the Soapbox: The Alberta Budget: Door No. 1, Door No. 2 or Door No. 3?

Before you let the Opposition parties scare you to death with apocalyptic warnings that Alberta is “drowning in debt”, “driving over a fiscal cliff” and “unfairly burdening future generations” read this article by U of C economics prof Trevor Tombe. Tombe points out that the amount of debt per se is meaningless.*  The relevant metric ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Josh Bivens explains why increased fairness would likely lead to improved overall growth for the U.S.’ economy: (O)ne key driver of slow productivity growth in recent years can be fixed: the remaining shortfall between aggregate demand and the economy’s productive potential. Running the economy far below potential for ...

The Canadian Progressive: Stephen Harper says “big multilateral trade deals are dead”

If you can believe it, former prime minister Stephen Harper wants you to know that the future of mega multilateral trade deals such as the doomed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is uncertain. The post Stephen Harper says “big multilateral trade deals are dead” appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Robert Reich comments on the absurdity of Donald Trump’s plan to shovel yet more money toward a military-industrial complex and corporate profiteers who already have more than they know what to do with. – Sara Fraser and Laura Chapin write that food insecurity is primarily an issue of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Wanda Wyporska writes that growing inequality is primarily the result of political choices: If it seems ridiculous that 1,000 people work harder or offer more value than 40 per cent of the population, that’s because it is. This level of inequality isn’t natural or desirable, it’s not about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board calls for an end to regressive federal tax breaks. And Dennis Howlett asks why the tax evaders who used KPMG’s illegal offshoring schemes are being offered secrecy and amnesty for their attempts to siphon revenue away from the Canadian public. – Michael Butler discusses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board calls for an end to regressive federal tax breaks. And Dennis Howlett asks why the tax evaders who used KPMG’s illegal offshoring schemes are being offered secrecy and amnesty for their attempts to siphon revenue away from the Canadian public. – Michael Butler discusses ...

The Canadian Progressive: Freeland Admits: U.S. Withdrawal Effectively Kills TPP Trade Deal

This week, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland admitted that the United States’ withdrawal from Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) effectively kills the mega trade deal. The post Freeland Admits: U.S. Withdrawal Effectively Kills TPP Trade Deal appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Federal budget must take action on inequality and boost economy

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ latest annual Alternative Federal Budget urges the federal government to table a budget that makes good on its promises to reduce income inequality and drive inclusive growth. The post Federal budget must take action on inequality and boost economy appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Chris Dillow examines a few of the reasons why neoliberalism hasn’t produced the promise of economic growth as the supposed benefit in exchange for dissolving social links. And William Berkson discusses the importance of an activist government in building a strong economy: The new books on the history ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Chris Dillow examines a few of the reasons why neoliberalism hasn’t produced the promise of economic growth as the supposed benefit in exchange for dissolving social links. And William Berkson discusses the importance of an activist government in building a strong economy: The new books on the history ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne questions whether Justin Trudeau’s brief nod to precarious work and burgeoning inequality will be reflected in any action. But Sheila Malcolmson notes that Trudeau’s say-anything approach includes turning himself into a human shield for Donald Trump, while PressProgress reports on the record-breaking petition to push Trudeau ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne questions whether Justin Trudeau’s brief nod to precarious work and burgeoning inequality will be reflected in any action. But Sheila Malcolmson notes that Trudeau’s say-anything approach includes turning himself into a human shield for Donald Trump, while PressProgress reports on the record-breaking petition to push Trudeau ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – David Giles reports on the increasing cost of living in Saskatchewan. And Barbara Ehrenreich writes about the future of the U.S.’ working class – including the reality that its major recent success has involved improving minimum wage levels: Now when politicians invoke “the working class,” they are likely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – David Giles reports on the increasing cost of living in Saskatchewan. And Barbara Ehrenreich writes about the future of the U.S.’ working class – including the reality that its major recent success has involved improving minimum wage levels: Now when politicians invoke “the working class,” they are likely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Daniel Tencer reports on Pierre Kohler and Servaas Storm’s study showing that the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement figures to cost jobs and wages in Canada and across Europe.  – Jim Tankersley explains the initial rise of the stock market since November’s U.S. election, while offering reason to ...

Dead Wild Roses: Gender and Coffee – Socialization in Action

We can change society in the (sociological) blink of an eye.  Unfortunately, it is usually in service of making a buck.  Highlights from JSTOR’s public section.   “For caffeine addicts, a morning without a pot of coffee is a no-go. But it hasn’t always been as convenient to make coffee as it is today—and as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Suzuki discusses the merits of a four-day work week in improving both working and living conditions:  It’s absurd that so many people still work eight hours a day, five days a week — or more — with only a few weeks’ vacation a year, often needing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Kevin Young, Tarun Banerjee and Michael Schwartz discuss how capital uses the exact tools it’s working to take away from labour – including the threat of strikes – to impose an anti-social agenda on the public: Capitalists routinely exert leverage over governments by withholding the resources — ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Peter Goodman observes that any meaningful action to build a more equal economy needs to involve bolstering wages and workers’ rights – meaning that the elites-only musings in Davos miss the point entirely: Davos is — at least rhetorically — consumed with worries about the shortcomings of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Tom Parkin points out that neither austerity nor isolationism offers any real solution to improve Canada’s fiscal and economic standing. And Rob Carrick highlights what should be the most worrisome form of debt – being the increased consumer debt taken on to allow people to keep spending in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jesse Ferreras reports that Canada’s supposed job growth has included almost nothing but part-time and precarious work. And Louis-Philippe Rochon points out how the influence of the financial sector has led to economic choices which serve nobody else’s interests: What makes governments hesitate to pursue policies they ...