Susan on the Soapbox: Thank You Alberta Party!

When Greg Clark stepped down as the leader of the Alberta Party Ms Soapbox wondered whether the party had lost its mind. When Rick Fraser and Stephen Mandel, two former Progressive Conservatives, entered the AP leadership race, Ms Soapbox wondered whether the party had been taken over by the Progressive Conservatives. She soon realized such ...

Dead Wild Roses: On Capitalist Democracy – Daniel Tayor

Daniel Taylor writing in Red Flag, addresses some of the systemic problems with the economic system we currently have.   “When the system is under strain, the “democratic deficit” of capitalism becomes obvious. No matter how many elections take place, the things we want don’t happen; the things we don’t want, do happen; and the ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the positive natural effects of minimum wage increases – and why we shouldn’t lose them to the threat of artificial problems being created by employers looking for excuses to exploit their workers. For further reading…– The Bank of Canada’s staff analytical note on the effect of planned minimum wage increases is here (PDF). ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Tom Parkin writes that job numbers inflated by part-time employment shouldn’t distract us from the consumer debt and wage stagnation which are living more and more people with precarious financial situations. Ben Leubsdorf reports on the recognition by members of the American Economic Association that upper-income and ...

Dead Wild Roses: Funny Gas Signs in Alberta

So this happened. Then they changed it to this. Like the climate change that comes along with carbon emissions DOESN’T hurt us. Short term thinking is our bane.  For the record – the carbon tax is a necessary feature of our society if we wish to continue to progress as a society and a nation. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Evening Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Brian Bethune interviews Joseph Stiglitz about his longstanding recognition that an international economic system biased toward capital could lay the groundwork for Trump-style demagoguery. – Kristin Annable reports on the Manitoba PCs’ steps toward for-profit health care as an alternative to properly funding and managing the public system. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Rupert Neate reports on the latest numbers showing the world’s 500 richest people adding a full trillion dollars to their wealth in 2017. And Will Fitzgibbon and Dean Starkman highlight how offshore tax avoidance schemes are sucking prosperity out of the rest of the world. – Noah ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Eduardo Porter examines how high-end tax cuts create gains for only the wealthy few. And Lydia DePillis points out that decades of increases to top-end incomes haven’t translated into anything close to proportional spending which would share the gains with society at large. – Juan Williams writes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on some of the economic ideas on offer from Ryan Meili and Trent Wotherspoon in Saskatchewan’s NDP leadership campaign. For further reading…– I’ve talked about some of the points of commonality between the candidates’ platforms here.– And the column responds in part to Murray Mandryk’s view that there’s some lack of talk about economic ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses how an ideology of individualism has undermined both freedom and security for most of the UK’s citizens: There are several reasons why rampant individualism sits at the core of the Tory project. Individualism promotes the idea that our successes in life are purely down ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Tom Campbell notes that we may not be far away from seeing the world’s first trillionaire – and that there’s a strong likelihood it will involve a confluence of extreme wealth and concentrated political power. – Meanwhile, Robert Reich observes that the U.S. Republicans’ tax scam is reinforcing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ryan Avent discusses how wage stagnation is harming U.S. productivity – and how a shift toward empowering workers could be the solution to both: If low wages are indeed inhibiting productivity, what can we do about it? A large corporate tax cut is unlikely to help. In ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Matt Bruenig writes that the concentration of wealth and power which is largely being attributed to crony capitalism is a natural byproduct of laissez-faire economics as well: An economy that distributes the national income based solely on the marginal productivity of each unit of capital and labor ...

Susan on the Soapbox: When They Go Low: the Kenney by-election debate

On Sunday afternoon Mr and Ms Soapbox were jammed into an overheated community hall listening to five politicians explain why they were the best choice to represent the good citizens of Calgary-Lougheed in the by-election triggered when Dave Rodney stepped down to give UCP leader Jason Kenney a seat in the Legislature. The media characterized ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Robert Reich reminds us that sustainable economic growth is the product of bottom-up development, not a top-down trickle of wealth: What’s the real formula for growth? Better access to education, healthcare, and transportation, all of which make workers more productive. These more productive workers command higher wages. ...

Dead Wild Roses: Autonomous Vehicles

      The dour feminist in me would like to point out that women are still struggling toward full autonomy in society after some 2000 years of ‘civilization’ ( :/ ), but the hot topic of self driving vehicles has crossed my desk and merits a comment or two with regards to society. A healthy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Joseph Stiglitz writes about the need to learn from past mistakes in order to build a sustainable economy for the future: To someone like me, who has watched trade negotiations closely for more than a quarter-century, it is clear that US trade negotiators got most of what ...

The Canadian Progressive: Capitalism Is Not the Only Choice

Capitalism in its current form enriches mostly privileged men and sidelines marginalized groups such as people of colour, immigrants and women. We need the courage to imagine and create new solidarity economies that prioritize people and the planet over profit. The post Capitalism Is Not the Only Choice appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Corporate influence inflames political cynicism

Even though elected politicians, especially those who end up holding cabinet positions, often prioritize corporate interests over those of their electors, David Suzuki still encourages us to overcome political cynicism and participate in the democratic process. The post David Suzuki: Corporate influence inflames political cynicism appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Climenhaga writes that Canada needs a lot more of Jeremy Corbyn’s critical analysis of an unfair economic system, and a lot less Justin Trudeau-style cheerleading for it. And Bill Curry reports on a new push to cut down on poverty at the national and provincial levels. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – George Monbiot writes that the erosion of government for the public good stands to lead to an authoritarian state: All that remain as widely shared, commonly accepted sources of national pride are our public services: the NHS, the BBC, the education system, social security, our great libraries and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Peter Goodman examines how a basic income could relieve against some of the most harmful effects of capitalist economics. And Sarah O’Connor discusses the plight of towns which have been left behind by economic change. – Meanwhile, Matt Bruenig offers a reminder that most extreme high incomes are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Rupert Neate reports on a new Credit Suisse study showing that the 1% owns half of the world’s wealth. And Heather Long notes that hundreds of U.S. millionaires are pushing not to have their taxes cut when it will only serve to exacerbate inequality. – Mark Townsend ...

Susan on the Soapbox: Question Period? Really?

How much longer do we have to put up with this nonsense? The Alberta Legislature has been in session for eight days and the UCP is using Question Period to test-drive political slogans. Jason Kenney UCP leader Ms Soapbox’s personal favourite is the UCP’s claim: “We lead, they follow”. The UCP’s “lead” translates into something ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – The Star’s editorial board argues that the Paradise Papers prove the need for a crackdown on offshore tax avoidance. Zach Dubinsky and Harvey Cashore report on one nine-figure scheme cooked up by BMO. And Oxfam offers its list of suggestions to end the UK’s tax scandals. – ...