Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Cédric Durand and Razmig Keucheyan highlight the return of economic planning as a widely-recognized public policy option – while pointing out the need for our democratic systems to allow for public direction of the planning process. And Lauren Townsend writes about the importance

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Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

This and that for your mid-week reading. – Rick Salutin discusses the needed rise of left-wing populism in the U.S.’ presidential campaign (and elsewhere). – Ed Finn highlights how policies designed around austerity and competition are designed to prevent people from cooperating toward the common good. And Erlend Kvitrud points

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Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Nick Hanauer discusses the futility of “educationism” which treats schools as the only factor in social outcomes without recognizing the importance of inequality and precarity in restricting opportunities for far too many children. And PressProgress points out that Brian Pallister’s Manitoba PCs –

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Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Stephen Maher writes that Michael Cooper’s choice to give voice to the Christchurch shooter’s manifesto represents a test of Andrew Scheer’s willingness to take action to match his words. And Scheer’s choice to quietly shuffle Cooper out of a single committee assignment

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Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Joseph Stiglitz points out the need to move beyond neoliberalism and offers a useful policy framework to do so – though framing an alternative as “progressive capitalism” cedes far more ground than necessary in continuing to prioritize capital over social well-being. – The

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Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Daniel Drenzer reviews Joseph Stiglitz’ People, Power and Profits, while noting the importance of pairing progressive policy ideas with a plan for implementation. And Laura Davison points out how Donald Trump’s massive tax losses which kept him from contributing to the U.S.’ public

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Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Edward Kleinbard argues that citizens should be asking the question of whether markets actually serve society’s best interests – while pointing out the compelling evidence to suggest they don’t at the moment. And David Love writes about the increasing recognition among the exceedingly

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