Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Angella MacEwen comments on the fight for universal child care, along with the lessons we can learn from Quebec’s experience. And Claire Cain Miller notes that inequality in the workplace extends to benefits as well as wages – with child care included alongside other supports which are currently ...

Accidental Deliberations: Lies and the lying liars who tell them

Ideally, this would be the end of the story when it comes to Stephen Harper’s callous and desperate attempt to claim the Terry Fox Foundation’s reputation for his own. But there’s reason for serious doubt that will happen – and indeed the Cons may end up treating the story as a case study in how ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford discusses how the Trans-Pacific Partnership is renegotiating NAFTA – and taking away what little Canada salvaged in that deal. And Jared Bernstein highlights the TPP’s impact on prescription drug costs. – Rick Smith rightly challenges the effort some people have made to minimize the difference ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kevin Carmichael compares the federal parties’ promises to help parents and concludes the NDP’s child care plan to hold far more social and economic benefit, while Natascia Lypny likewise finds that parents are more interested in actual affordable child-care spaces than tax baubles. CTV reports on the NDP’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: On partial answers

Having posted earlier on the message we should expect from our opposition leaders when it comes to ensuring change, let’s make clear exactly what Justin Trudeau has now said – and most notably, what he hasn’t said. “There are no circumstances” under which the Liberals would prop up Harper should the Tories emerge with only ...

Accidental Deliberations: On questionable support

Shorter Stephen Harper: I only need to receive a single piece of correspondence from somebody to claim their permanent blanket endorsement of everything I might someday propose. Stay tuned for future policy announcements unveiled with the enthusiastic support of grade-school penpals, American Express, and multiple members of Nigeria’s royal family.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Oxfam points out that without a major redistributive effort, hundreds of millions of people will be trapped in extreme poverty around the globe no matter how much top-end growth is generated.And Michael Valpy writes that the Cons have gone out of their way to stifle any talk ...

Accidental Deliberations: On rigged outcomes

I’m not sure when “what would Michael Ignatieff do?” became the Libs’ operating mantra. But as long as the subject of fighter procurement is on the table, let’s highlight the real similarity between two parties on that front: both the Cons and the Libs seem bent on handing Lockheed Martin billions of dollars it’s done ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Roheena Saxena points out that personal privilege tends to correlate to selfishness in distributing scarce resources. And that in turn may explain in part why extreme top-end wealth isn’t even mentioned in a new inequality target under development by the UN. – Or, for that matter, the Calgary ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Haroon Siddiqui comments on the Cons’ tall economic tales. And Steven Chase and Greg Keenan note that workers are rightly fighting back against the Cons’ plan to sell out Canada’s auto parts industry and its 80,000 jobs. – Canadian Doctors for Medicare weighs in with its approval ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Michal Rozworski highlights the deeper economic issues which are receiving minimal attention compared to deficits and minor amounts of infrastructure spending in Canada’s federal election: In the long term, two decades of Liberal and Conservative austerity have left Canada with a revenue problem, rather than a spending problem. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – PressProgress highlights just a few of the Cons’ obviously-flawed claims about corporate tax rates. And Ethan Cox discusses why we should be talking about the CETA and TPP during the campaign both due to their own importance, and the potential to tap into public concerns.  – Martin Lukacs ...

Accidental Deliberations: On changing standards

Paul MacLeod reports on the latest candidate to be summarily axed due to an even mildly controversial social media history uncovered by Robert Jago, while Robyn Urback suggests either a truce or a wholesale destruction of past posts. But it’s worth asking what comes next for Canada’s political parties – and particularly whether they’ll have ...

Accidental Deliberations: On wasted opportunities

Before the first federal leaders’ debate, I wrote about the factors worth watching for which we might not otherwise get to evaluate during the course of a campaign. But unfortunately, we didn’t get much chance at all meaningfully test the party leaders’ judgment due to some poor choices in the presentation of the Globe and ...

Accidental Deliberations: On unclear pictures

David Akin may have been right to point out that Justin Trudeau’s response to the federal government’s latest fiscal update was based on an avoidable lack of knowledge. But it’s worth noting why it’s so difficult for anybody to have an accurate picture of what’s actually happened within the federal government – as Akin himself ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, summarizing these posts as to how the opposition parties can set the stage for a minority Parliament by telling us what they’ll do on the first set of confidence votes – and how we can make better voting choices if they fail to do so. For further reading…– Having mentioned the expected outcome of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Paul Weinberg discusses the need to focus on inequality in Canada’s federal election, while Scott Deveau and Jeremy Van Loon take note of the fact that increased tax revenue is on the table. The Star’s editorial board weighs in on the NDP’s sound and progressive fiscal plan. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Exchange highlights the World Economic Forum’s observation that countries can do far more to combat inequality. And Angus Reid finds that Canadian voters are far more receptive to Tom Mulcair’s progressive economic plan than to more of the same from either of the major competing leaders. – Meanwhile, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Climenhaga sees Jeremy Corbyn’s resounding victory in the Labour leadership race as compelling evidence that progressive hope can win over centre-right fearmongering, while Michael Laxer takes some lessons away for Canadian politics. And Paul Krugman notes that there’s a reason why voting members didn’t take the ...

Accidental Deliberations: In need of explanation

Lee Berthiaume reports on the $8.7 billion budgeted but unspent by the federal government over the past year. And if the Cons want to try to claim credit for the government’s fiscal position, then surely they have to answer a couple of key questions for the money that went unspent: What caused them to decide ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Ira Basen discusses the Canadian federal election campaign’s focus on the middle class – as well as the reality that the economic security which looms as the most important priority within that group will require more government action than the limited policies currently on offer. And Tavia Grant ...

Accidental Deliberations: On caretakers

Since there’s been plenty of talk lately about caretaker governments and their duty to exercise restraint, I’ll raise one question as to the appointments made the last time a new federal government took office. The day he and his Cabinet were sworn in, and two months before Parliament convened following the 2006 federal election, Stephen ...

Accidental Deliberations: On simplified procedures

Following up on this post, let’s also note how the right answer from Canada’s opposition parties could combine with the seeming agreement between the major party leaders as to the “most seats first” principle to take nearly all of the guesswork out of a post-election minority Parliament. Again, the range of possible outcomes absent some ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Following his resounding win to become Labour’s leader, Jeremy Corbyn describes the proper role of government as a vehicle for shared benefits: We understand aspiration and we understand that it is only collectively that our aspirations can be realised. Everybody aspires to an affordable home, a secure ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Walkom discusses how Canadian workers are feeling the pain of decades of policy designed to suppress wages – and notes there’s plenty more all parties should be doing to change that reality. And Doug Saunders points out what we should want our next federal government to pursue ...