Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Dwyer writes about the cumulative effect a childhood in poverty has on individual development. And Lee Elliot Major calls out the self-perpetuating exclusion set up by the wealthy to preserve their privilege: A survey found that the ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ now helps to finance ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The BBC reports that even UK business groups are acknowledging that excessive executive pay is leading to public concern and distrust in the state of the economy. And Alex Hern notes that Steve Wozniak for one isn’t shy to point out the need for Apple and other corporations ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne writes about the need for a Bernie Sanders in Canada to highlight and oppose the privilege of the wealthy few: It is in this context of blatant unfairness — rules for the rich and rules for the rest — that politicians like Bernie Sanders have become ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – In the wake of the Panama Papers, Don Pittis writes that tax shelters serve only to ensure that the wealthy don’t pay their fair share for a functional society – meaning that everybody who can’t afford to engage in financial shenanigans is left to pick up the slack. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sean McElwee examines how the wealthy control the U.S.’ political system, while public opinion plays far too little role in policy choices: A comprehensive study by Grossmann finds that public opinion was a significant factor in 25 percent of policy changes since 1945. More influential factors have included ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Kuttner writes about the increasing recognition that extreme inequality arises out of power imbalances rather than any natural state of affairs: (I)nfluential orthodox economists are having serious second thoughts. What if market outcomes and the very rules of the market game reflect political power, not market efficiency? ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Nicholas Fitz observes that inequality is far worse than the U.S. public believes – even as it already wants to see significant action. And Thomas Piketty updates his policy prescriptions arising out of Capital: As I look back at my discussion of future policy proposals in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Ian Welsh summarizes why inequality is intrinsically problematic: Even where people’s needs are met, the more unequal a society the more unhealthy everyone is and the more unhappy they are. Those who feel lower on the totem pole also perform worse than they otherwise would.  Remove the feeling ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Patrick Flavin studies (PDF) the direct benefits that flow from giving people secure access to health care. And Daphne Bramham writes that the damage done by child poverty can be directly observed in educational outcomes: Anyone who questions whether child poverty is real in British Columbia should ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Alan Freeman notes that the Libs’ aversion to raising public revenue may lock in some of the Cons’ most damaging actions: With the new Liberal government facing fierce economic headwinds — plus a billion-dollar shortfall created by its middle-income tax cut, and a growing need for revenue ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Kaylie Tiessen offers some important lessons from Ontario’s child poverty strategy – with the most important one being the importance of following through. And Christian Ledwell encourages Prince Edward Island’s MPs to lead a push toward a basic income, while PressProgress calls out the Fraser Institute for trying ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – George Monbiot discusses the inherent conflict between consumption and conservation: We can persuade ourselves that we are living on thin air, floating through a weightless economy, as gullible futurologists predicted in the 1990s. But it’s an illusion, created by the irrational accounting of our environmental impacts. This illusion ...

Accidental Deliberations: On progressive evaluations

I’ll give Emmett MacFarlane the benefit of the doubt in having missed one of the NDP’s key promises while assessing the Libs’ attempt to mimic Kathleen Wynne’s campaigning on the title of “progressive” in the absence of any intention to follow up while on power. But leaving aside the utter lack of credibility of Justin ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Brendan O’Neill writes that the UK Cons are following in Stephen Harper’s footsteps by pushing the concept of thought policing. And George Monbiot rightly criticizes the gross inflation of supposed terror threats and simultaneous neglect of far more serious risks: A global survey published last week by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Thomas Edsall discusses how increased atomization is making it more difficult for people to join together in seeking change, no matter how obvious it is that there’s a need to counter the concentrated power and wealth of the privileged few: The cultural pressures driving inequality are…reinforced by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Dollar for dollar

Thomas Mulcair’s Progress Summit commitment that an NDP government will redirect the value of a stock option tax loophole toward families in need will surely make for one of the most important moments of a summit directed at developing exactly those types of ideas. So it’s unquestionably important that Mulcair is willing to take Canada ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Kendra Coulter discusses the connection between human treatment of animals and humans: Close to home and around the world, working class and poor people are really struggling. In countries like Canada, unemployment and underemployment persist. We have been told that corporate tax cuts would create jobs, yet many ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Cameron Dearlove laments the fact that Canada is failing to recognize and replicate other countries’ successes in using the social determinants of health to shape public policy: Today we know that social and financial inequities — particularly the experience of poverty — has a greater impact on our ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford reminds us that any drama as to whether Canada’s budget will be balanced this year is entirely of the Cons’ own making through pointless tax slashing: Running spending cuts since 2011 now total more than $14-billion a year. Canadians experience real consequences from those cuts ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Hugh Segal discusses the need for an open and honest conversation about poverty and how to end it. And to better reflect Canadians’ continued desire for a more fair society, Roderick Benns makes the case for a basic income as Canada’s next major social program. – Matt ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the need to turn the holiday spirit of charity into lasting improvements in the lives of the people who need help the most. For further reading…– Joe Gunn and Iglika Ivanova also discuss the limitations of charity compared to structural change. – Jordon Cooper discusses Saskatchewan’s bad habit of accepting food banks as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Carter Price offers another look at how inequality damages economic development. And the Broadbent Institute examines the wealth gap in Canada – which is already recognized as a serious problem, but also far larger than most people realize: – Paul Buchheit discusses how the U.S. is turning ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Reviewing Darrell West’s Billionaires, Michael Lewis discusses how extreme wealth doesn’t make anybody better off – including the people fighting for position at the top of the wealth spectrum: A team of researchers at the New York State Psychiatric Institute surveyed 43,000 Americans and found that, by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Murray Dobbin writes about the damage caused after decades of allowing the corporate elite to dictate economic policy – and notes that the Cons are determined to make matters all the worse: However you see it — as separate from society or integral to it — Canada’s “economy” is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Mark Gongloff takes a look at social mobility research from multiple countries, and finds that there’s every reason for concern that inheritance is far outweighing individual attributes in determining social status. And Left Futures notes that the problem may only get worse as our corporate overlords become ...