Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Eva Schaherl offers her take on how to fight against climate change: Stop being distracted by the “Sad!” theatre of the Greatest Show on Earth across our southern border. In Canada our leadership debates should be focused on how to save the world’s life-support systems, not imitating the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Scott Clark and Peter DeVries point out that with interest rates still at historically low levels, Canada would be far better off funding infrastructure for itself rather than locking itself into privatized structures: But that is not true at all at the federal level.  The federal government funds ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Wanda Wyporska writes that growing inequality is primarily the result of political choices: If it seems ridiculous that 1,000 people work harder or offer more value than 40 per cent of the population, that’s because it is. This level of inequality isn’t natural or desirable, it’s not about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading: – Percy Downe notes that both the Harper Cons and Trudeau Libs have stood in the way of identifying and recouping tens of billions of dollars in unpaid taxes – leaving everybody else to pay the share of tax evaders. And Riley Sparks discusses how secret settlements – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading: – Percy Downe notes that both the Harper Cons and Trudeau Libs have stood in the way of identifying and recouping tens of billions of dollars in unpaid taxes – leaving everybody else to pay the share of tax evaders. And Riley Sparks discusses how secret settlements – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Jordy Cummings exposes the shady side of Justin Trudeau’s shin persona. Dimitri Lascaris interviews Nora Loreto about Canada’s relationship with the U.S. And Michal Rozworski challenges Trudeau’s decision to serve as a prop for Donald Trump rather than defending Canadian values: The point to remember is that there would ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Claudia Chwalisz points out that in addition to relying on a distortionary electoral system, the Trudeau Libs’ majority was built on a bubble which now seems likely to pop. Michael Harris wagers that Canadians will remember the broken core promise when they go to the polls in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Brent Patterson criticizes the Libs’ short-sighted plans to privatize public services in lieu of any coherent economic policy. And Tom Parkin calls out their bait-and-switch approach to infrastructure. – Robin McKie reports on Nicholas Stern’s recognition that his much-cited work on the impacts of climate change only underestimated ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Brendan Duke examines the connection between wage growth and worker productivity, and makes the case that the former may lead to the latter: The 1929–1950 increase in wages was at first a result of several policies that directly raised workers’ wages, including the first federal minimum wage, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Chris Hamby’s brilliant series on the effects of investor-state dispute settlement continues with articles on the shift in power from governments to corporations, as well as the developing market in settlement speculation. – Gordon Laxer argues that if NAFTA is in fact up for renegotiation, Canada should ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Chris Hamby’s brilliant series on the effects of investor-state dispute settlement continues with articles on the shift in power from governments to corporations, as well as the developing market in settlement speculation. – Gordon Laxer argues that if NAFTA is in fact up for renegotiation, Canada should ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Mariana Mazzucato discusses (JPG) the importance of an intelligent industrial strategy. And David Kotz argues that neoliberal capitalism has reached the point where there’s no plausible path toward sustainable growth without a new economic model: For several decades, neoliberal capitalism was able to bring a series of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Mark Karlin interviews Richard Wolff about the relationship between unfettered capitalism and poverty: How is poverty an inevitable by-product of capitalism? Doesn’t this make all these charitable drives “to eliminate poverty” disingenuous because it cannot be eliminated in a capitalistic system? Poverty has always accompanied capitalism (as Thomas Piketty’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mary O’Hara reviews Daniel Hatcher’s new book on the U.S.’ poverty industry which seeks to exploit public supports for private gain: (A) new book published last week by law professor and advocate Daniel L Hatcher, The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America’s Most Vulnerable Citizens, exposes a largely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Hamilton Nolan interviews Branko Milanovic about inequality on both a national and international scale – and how there’s little reason to take heart in reductions in the latter if it’s paired with increases in the former: Gawker: Is it fair for people to ask what good the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Brent Patterson points out the continued dangers of extrajudicial challenges to laws under the CETA. And John Jacobs examines (PDF) the likelihood that reduced tariffs under the Trans-Pacific Partnership would mostly push Canada toward further dependence on resource extraction. – Ken Jacobs, Zohar Perla, Ian Perry and Dave ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Glen Pearson makes the case for transcending cynicism in our politics, including the choice to stay involved once an election is done. And Ian Welsh reminds us that our definition of property is socially established – meaning that many of the assumptions as to what we can ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alison Griswold points out how little systemic information we have about the growing gig economy. And both Scott Santens and Richard Reeves make the case for a basic income to provide financial security where an increasingly precarious labour market won’t. – Meanwhile, Branko Milanovic argues that we ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Robert Reich writes about the growing disconnect between the few well-connected people who have warped our political and economic systems for their benefit, and the rest of us who are on the wrong side of that system: (C)orporate executives and Wall Street managers and traders have done ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Thom Hartmann highlights how trickle-down economics have swamped the U.S.’ middle class: Creating a middle class is always a choice, and by embracing Reaganomics and cutting taxes on the rich, we decided back in 1980 not to have a middle class within a generation or two. George H.W. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brad Delong discusses the two strains of neoliberalism which dominate far too much political discussion – and the reason why the left-oriented version doesn’t offer any plausible analysis of where we stand: (Bill) Clintonian left-neoliberalism makes two twin arguments. The first is addressed to the left: it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Paul Krugman highlights the policy areas where we need to look to the public sector for leadership – including those such as health care and income security where we all have a strong interest in making sure that nobody’s left behind. And Andre Picard reminds us of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michael Babad writes that we should be glad to see jobs being created in the public sector since the private sector is doing nothing to offer opportunities for Canadians. And Andrew Jackson discusses how Quebec’s progressive economic model has served it well, while offering an example which other ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports on the work done by the Broadbent Institute and Mariana Mazzucato to highlight the importance of publicly-funded innovation: According to a 2014 report by the International Monetary Fund, Canadian companies have been accumulating “dead money” at a faster rate than any other G7 country, rather ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Sunday reading. – Al Engler argues that it’s long past time to start raising taxes on the wealthy to make sure that Canada can fund the level of social development we deserve. – Kevin Drum writes that we shouldn’t be satisfied with a temporary dip in inequality caused by the 2008 ...