Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In advance of this year’s Progress Summit, Ed Broadbent writes that burgeoning inequality threatens our democracy: Inequality matters. Promises must be kept. It’s not enough for our government to celebrate the diversity of our country but not enact policies that head off growing inequality. Mr. Trudeau, it’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Tom Parkin points out that neither austerity nor isolationism offers any real solution to improve Canada’s fiscal and economic standing. And Rob Carrick highlights what should be the most worrisome form of debt – being the increased consumer debt taken on to allow people to keep spending in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Ellen Gould comments on how the CETA and other trade deals constrain democratic governance – and the fact that corporate bigwigs are threatening any government which considers giving effect to popular opposition doesn’t exactly provide any comfort. Meanwhile, Scott Sinclair points out the dangerous effects of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Armine Yalnizyan points out the choice between a basic income and the provision of basic services, while making a strong case to focus on the latter: At the federal level, the cost of raising everyone’s income above the poverty line is an estimated $30 billion a year. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how to fight for needed alternatives to neoliberalism in the face of seemingly daunting odds and structural barriers. – Noah Smith points out how most economic analysis omits important social factors which ultimately matter far more to people than marginal GDP. And as a ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on the Brexit vote as both a dangerous step toward an even more business-biased system of international relations, and a cautionary tale about basing votes on frustration. For further reading…– John Hilary highlights the trade negotiations likely to follow from the Brexit vote. And Jamie Doward takes a look at the “passport” ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives rounds up some noteworthy responses to the federal budget. Barbara Sibbald and Laura Eggertson write that while a few social determinants of health made the cut, our actual health care system will see virtually nothing. Armine Yalnizyan highlights how it falls short ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Elaine Power discusses how a basic income can build both individual security and social solidarity: We work for lots of different reasons, not just money. And most of us do work that is never paid. To start, we need to change our ideas about work, not just ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan highlights how Volkswagen’s emissions cheating scandal is just one more compelling piece of evidence against trusting the corporate sector to regulate itself: The trend is towards asking industries to monitor themselves (at their own suggestion), which they quite happily will do, and tell you what they ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Armine Yalnizyan sees the Volkswagen emissions test cheating as a classic example of the dangers of relying on business to do anything toward the social good without facing strong and effectively-enforced regulations. And George Monbiot describes just a few of the preposterous new forms of waste we’re generating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Howard Elliott writes about the need for senior levels of government to help address the housing needs facing Canadian communities. And the report from Saskatchewan’s advisory group on poverty reduction includes housing among its key priorities as well (while also favouring work on a basic income). – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Cay Johnston observes that the U.S.’ extreme inequality goes far beyond money alone. And Jesse Myerson notes that a basic income can be supported based on principles held across the political spectrum, while making the case as to how it should be developed to serve as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that reliance on temporary and disposable labour is utterly incompatible with long-term economic development. And Joey Hartman and Adrienne Montani comment on Vancouver’s efforts to support a living wage rather than grinding down employment standards. – Andy Skuce points out that our already-worrisome best estimates ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mariana Mazzucato writes about the creative state – and the need to accept that a strategy designed to fund the economy that doesn’t yet exist will necessarily need to include some projects which don’t turn out as planned: Like any other investor, the state will not always ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Armine Yalnizyan counters the Cons’ spin on tax-free savings accounts. And Rob Carrick points out that raising the limit on TFSAs would forfeit billions of desperately-needed dollars to benefit only the wealthiest few in Canada: TFSAs are Swiss army knives – a financial knife, corkscrew, screwdriver and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Monica Pohlmann interviews Armine Yalnizyan about the undue influence of our corporate overlords in setting public policy: What’s your sense of the state of our democracy? We have a troubled relationship with our democratic institutions. We need to get over the idea that government is something and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.  – Lynn Stuart Parramore writes about our increasingly traumatic social and political culture, along with the response which can help to overcome it: A 2012 study of hospital patients in Atlanta’s inner-city communities showed that rates of post-traumatic stress are now on par with those of veterans returning from war ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Paul Krugman’s review of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century includes his commentary on our new gilded age: Still, today’s economic elite is very different from that of the nineteenth century, isn’t it? Back then, great wealth tended to be inherited; aren’t today’s economic elite people ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Stewart Prest writes about the Cons’ war against experts: (I)n modern democratic states one of the most important sources for non-partisan information and expertise is the government itself. Government bureaucracies are the only institutions in the world today with the access, the resources, and the motivation to systematically ...

Alberta Diary: Shining you on: Alison Redford calls for a little selective sunshine on civil service salaries

The scene in February 2014: CBC investigative journalist Charles Rusnell pores through a list of senior Alberta civil service salaries as horrified deputy ministers and university professors look on. Actual Alberta public employees may not appear exactly as illustrated. Below: Associate Minister of Accountability, Transparency and Transformation Don Scott, left, with some guy his party ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Scott Doherty recognizes that Saskatchewan’s failure to collect a reasonable royalty rate for potash and other natural resources is directly responsible for the province crying poor when workers are laid off. And Alex Himelfarb points out that the magical theory behind perpetual tax cuts is purely a matter ...