Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Vicki Nash challenges the claim that unemployment in a precarious economy is generally a matter of choice rather than the absence thereof. And Jia Tolentino argues that we shouldn’t pretend there’s any value in being forced to work oneself to death: It does require a fairly dystopian strain ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Coyne and Rob Mason each discuss Justin Trudeau’s broken promise of a fairer electoral system. Chantal Hebert observes that the commitment itself – however frequently and fervently repeated – looks to have been little more than a cheap campaign prop. And Karl Nerenberg highlights how the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Linda McQuaig writes about the dangerous spread of privatized health care which threatens to undermine our universal system: Privatization advocates want us to believe public health care is no longer affordable. But in fact, it’s private, for-profit medicine that’s unaffordable. The publicly funded portion of our health ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Unopen Government #nlpoli

The idea of open data has been around for a while. In government, it means that government would make information like census data,  statistics,  licensing information easily and freely available for anyone to use, free of charge and any restrictions. It’s a way of sparking creativity, crowd-sourcing new information, and basically spending less time and ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: The Sunshine List Case hits the court #nlpoli

The public sector unions’ attack on freedom of information is finally in front of a judge.  The unions want to  block disclosure of the names of public servants in response to a request from the Telegram’s James McLeod for a list of public service positions in which the person holding the job makes more than $100,000 ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: The trouble with transparency – CADO version #nlpoli

“How do you deal with a government computer system that is hopelessly out of date it wants you to ‘update’ your Internet browser to a version that is actually three version older than the one you are using?” That would be the online search for the government registry of deeds, companies, and lobbyists.  The thing ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: No help, not my department, and missing records #nlpoli

Starting a little over a hundred years ago,  the Government of Newfoundland  publishing a list of public servants by name, showing their job title, the department they worked for,  the annual salary,and the Christian denomination to which they belonged. Since 1981 and the passage of the first freedom of information law in the province,  anyone ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Illegal deletions okay in NL: access commissioner #nlpoli

Shortly after he took office a month or so ago,  newly appointed information commissioner Donovan Molloy told CBC there had been a “substantial increase” in the number of access to information requests since 2015 when the House of Assembly passed a new access to information law. True, said the always accurate labradore, but that was ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the City of Regina’s actual treatment of key information runs contrary to its stated commitment to open government. For further reading…– Natascia Lypny’s report on the City’s delays and denials of access to information about Regina’s new stadium and wastewater treatment plant is here.  – I previously wrote about the City’s initial ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Abi Wilkinson argues that we can’t expect to take anger and other emotions out of political conversations when government choices have created nothing but avoidable stress for so many: Actions can certainly be morally unacceptable. In my opinion, emotions cannot. Really, it’s a manifestation of extreme privilege to ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Public interest served by contract disclosure #nlpoli

There’s no small irony that NAPE is fighting to increase public disclosure of government spending while other public sector unions are busily trying to drag the public back into the Dark Ages by hiding the names of union members earning more than $100,000 a year in pay and benefits. NAPE is trying to get access ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Phillipe Orliange discusses the significance of inequality in the developing world as a problem for both fairness and economic development: The question of inequality has become so important because societal cohesion broadly depends upon it. It is not normal for 1% of the population to possess as much ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Cynthia Kaufman discusses Moses Naim’s theory that while a transnational ruling class has managed to exercise almost total control over the functions of government, it’s set to lose power over the public at large. And 63Mag interviews Jennifer Hollett about the future of progressive activism and organizing in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Johnna Montgomerie makes the case to treat austerity as a failed experiment. But Laura Basu points out that misleading coverage of economic and fiscal news has led far too many people to see the damage done by austerity as originating from other sources. – Meanwhile, the Economist examines ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Alison Crawford reports on the Libs’ failure to pass any new legislation to allow collective bargaining for RCMP members – leaving them with even less than the system which was already found to be unconstitutional. And Jake Johnson discusses the consequences of the U.S. corporate sector’s war ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Tom Parkin writes about the growing divide between the lucky few who are siphoning wealth out of Canada, and the mass of people facing a precarious economic future. – PressProgress highlights much the same distinction by examining the types of workers who make less in a year ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Ring access ruling blames wrong culprit #nlpoli

To understand why access commissioner Ed Ring’s ruling issued last Monday was troubling, you have to know some back story. Ring was ruling in an investigation over an access request for two reports that should be in the Premier’s Office.  An access request for copies of the reports got the reply that the office doesn’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Angella MacEwen discusses how most of what’s sold as “free trade” serves mostly to hand power to the corporate sector at the expense of the public. Ashley Csanady and Monika Warzecha point out that the same is true for Ontario’s business subsidies and tax credits which are normally ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Joining the access fight #nlpoli

As it turns out, the “commentary” on access from information and privacy commissioner Ed Ring is tied to a lawsuit coming from the province’s teachers’ union to block an access to information disclosure to the Telegram for a list of teachers and principals making more than $100,000 a year in salary. The school district hasn’t ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Resettlement story wrong #nlpoli

Access to documents from government are one thing. Understanding what they say is quite another. CBC requested batches of documents from the provincial government about efforts by the people of Little Bay Islands to relocate from their isolated community to other places. “No government money in budget for rural relocation program” ran the headline on ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Open Data #nlpoli

James McLeod has released the data he compiled to produce his Saturday story on the number of people in the provincial public service who make a salary of more than $100, 000 a year. What James has done is follow the Open Data policy the former Conservative government announced but never implemented.  The new crowd ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Stanford offers a warning to Australia about Canada’s history of gratuitous corporate tax giveaways: (S)uccessive cuts reduced combined Canadian corporate taxes (including provincial rates, which also fell in several provinces) from near 50 per cent of pre-tax income in the early 1980s, to 26 per cent ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Carol Goar summarizes the Institute for Research on Public Policy’s review of the steps needed to rein in inequality in the long term, while pointing out the one factor which will determine whether anything gets done: At first glance, it looks intimidating. But on closer examination, it is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Katie Hyslop contrasts Canada’s longstanding recognition that housing is a human right against the gross lack of policy action to ensure its availability: Canada has signed and ratified the 1976 United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and in Article 11 it does recognize ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Cabinet documents and no brainers #nlpoli

Years ago,  a couple of enterprising reporters at CBC submitted what was then a request under the Freedom of Information Act for information about entertainment expense allowances for senior bureaucrats and cabinet ministers. They got the information and aired a story that claimed that, in a time of great restraint,  the government had increased the ...